Router Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Attie

Just my 2 cents :)

A dull bit is a dangers bit ( A source or an instance of risk or peril ) they are cheap now days and not worth the risk.
It takes a high tech. machine (CNC) to sharpen a router bits and doing by hand will just make it worst...
Just pitch it and get a new one ,HSS is one thing and carb.tip bits is a another. :)

Bj :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Dull Router Bits

Dull Router bits are indeed dangerous, sometimes they can be very expensive to sharpen too. Sometimes it only takes a couple of months for them to lose their sharpness with regular use. I sell router bits for low prices under $20, it probably is much more worth it to buy those than to sharpen them!

Greg

[email protected]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
I agree with the other posters. While it is theoretically possible to sharpen a router bit, unless done with great precision by a pro with the proper equipment, the resulting bit becomes a grave (perhaps literally) danger. Even expensive bits are far less costly than a trip to the hospital.

Sometimes, however, the "dullness" is a result of pitch accumulation that can be solved by cleaning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Sometimes, however, the "dullness" is a result of pitch accumulation that can be solved by cleaning.

Iseem to remember soem commercial products to due just that. Is there anything we may have already in the shop that can clean them? Alcohol, paint thinner, stripper? I have a few that just might respond to taht treatment.....
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Most Rockler and Woodcraft stores offer sharpening services. If you have an inexpensive bit you bought for a job or two you may be better off just replacing it. If you have one of the premium bits such as Whiteside, CMT, Amana or Freud then sharpening is well worth the cost. These bits can be sharpened several times before replacement is needed. If your bit has a chip out of the carbide it is done. Cleaning bits often leads to rust. People forget that in removing the built up pitch they are also removing the barrier that prevents rust. You can use turpentine to dissolve the pitch, scrubbing where needed with a toothbrush. Once you are done it is a good idea to soak the bit in WD-40 for 5 minutes and then wipe completely dry with a clean soft cloth. Remember those bit edges are razor sharp and care is in order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
Iseem to remember soem commercial products to due just that. Is there anything we may have already in the shop that can clean them? Alcohol, paint thinner, stripper? I have a few that just might respond to taht treatment.....
I don't think I'd use stripper, but a little naptha or lacquer thinner on a shop towel or rag might do the trick.

Just be sure to follow safe procedures with the rag - letting it air dry flat, before throwing it away or storing, so you don't start a fire in your shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,747 Posts
You may "Touch up" a carbide wing cutter with a few stokes on a medium diamond pad. Just do the same number of strokes on each wing. This more akin to flattening a plane blade than actually sharpening. You are just removing burrs that may be there. works for me.

Other types of bits are best left to the pros. Remembering too, that sharpening will reduce the diameter.

As far as cleaning goes, please be careful with naptha, ketone or lacquer thinner. These chemicals are known to leach out the lubricant in the bearings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
while I sharpen all my planer/jointer knives and saw blades at home, I have no machine that will sharpen my bits.admittedly, I don't use them as much, but when the do get dull, I'll pitch them and buy new. Sharpening services can get very expensive..in fact, it got to the point that it was cheaper to buy new knives/blades than to have 'em sharpened.last time I had 1 40 tooth blade and 2 double-sided knives sharpened, it set me back $58.00.... I decided to buy 2 decent machines to sharpen my stuff, and recoup the cost over time. I'd do the same for bits, but CNCs are prohibitively expensive. I'd never recoup that expenditure.
it's a shame, too, because I hate tossing good things away....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I have been using Simple Green to clean my bits. I take the bearings off and let them soak for about 5-10 minutes. Do follow Mike's advice and spray them with some type of rust inhibitor. As far as sharpening, I will get my Freuds, CMT, Amanas, and Whiteside bits sharpened, but I stock up on the cheaper ones and throw them out when they start having issues. I tried (just for fun) to use a stone on a cheap chamfer bit, but noticed that I made it worse. Look for them on sale. seems like everyday I get emails about bits on sale.
Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
I know this might sound silly, but im very new to routing so far ive used my router just for testing havent actually built anything YET! still trying to get my shop finished but bought a router on sale , but now ive heard you guys talk about how dangerous it is to use a dull bit, Will I know when my bit is dull? is there any tell tale signs that i should be aware of and looking for once i do start using my router on a more regular basis?

thanks in advance for your responses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
989 Posts
I send my larger bits i.e. the expensive ones away to be professionally ground and sharpened, any good saw doctor can do this, it is not expensive, you would not throw away bits costing from £40-00 upwards would you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
I know this might sound silly, but im very new to routing so far ive used my router just for testing havent actually built anything YET! still trying to get my shop finished but bought a router on sale , but now ive heard you guys talk about how dangerous it is to use a dull bit, Will I know when my bit is dull? is there any tell tale signs that i should be aware of and looking for once i do start using my router on a more regular basis?

thanks in advance for your responses.
The usual signs of a dull bit are poor cuts and/or burning of the cut. The bit may also overheat and darken. Bits will become dull from use, but will do so more quickly with misuse - like trying to remove all of the material in a single pass when working with hardwoods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
989 Posts
One of the greatest exponents of routing is Patrick Spielman, It's funny how some things stick in your memory, he said " to test if a bit is sharp try to shave your thumbnail if you can then the bit will do "
Try it, you will see he was right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Hi Derek,

Your stated method rings a bell, although it was not for wood working. That was a method I used to determine if a fish hook I sharpened was sharp enough. You draw it across your thumbnail and if it catches, it is sharp. If I tried that with a router bit, I would probably end up with a nasty cut when it reached thumb skin.

Joe Z.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Guys

I do it about the same but I draw it across some paper on a block of wood..if it cuts the paper clean it's sharp,,I don't have that many thumb nails to use to check the bits with..

=====
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top