Router Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a cocobolo jewelry box in the works. I'm kinda tired of finishing cocobolo with lacquer and I know you shouldn't use danish oil. I heard that dewaxed shellac is an alternative. Can anyone give me ideas on the best way to do that, or maybe another finishing option? I really appreciate it.
Kevin
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Kevin, why shouldn't you use Danish oil to finish a jewelry box? An interaction with the cocobolo?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Any of the different grades of shellac would work very nicely. De-waxed shellac is usually recommended if you are going to top coat with polyurethane varnish or water borne acrylic, If you have any small scraps of the wood left over this might be a good time to experiment with some of the less refined grades of shellac to see the many subtle colors available. Since shellac uses alcohol as a solvent it is easier to pad on than to use a brush for most people. Remember shellac is not varnish and shouldn't be applied the same way.

Regards
Jerry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
jerrymayfield said:
Any of the different grades of shellac would work very nicely. De-waxed shellac is usually recommended if you are going to top coat with polyurethane varnish or water borne acrylic, If you have any small scraps of the wood left over this might be a good time to experiment with some of the less refined grades of shellac to see the many subtle colors available. Since shellac uses alcohol as a solvent it is easier to pad on than to use a brush for most people. Remember shellac is not varnish and shouldn't be applied the same way.

Regards
Jerry
Thanks, Jerry. I've never used shellac before. So are you saying that, if I am going to use shellac only, I don't need the de-waxed? I noticed when I looked at a can of the clear shellac at the BORG, it said to cut it with denatured alcohol to thin it out. Does this mean I can apply it like I would Danish oil? Also, how many coats would you recommend? It's in the mid 90's here in central Arkansas. Humidity is in the mid 30's. How would that affect the recommended dry time of 30 minutes?
Thank you so much,
Kevin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
The only reason to use de-waxed shellac is if you use polyurethane varnish or water borne acrylic as a topcoat. Shellac dries very quickly and the hotter the quicker. When appling shellac lay down a strip from one end to the other(land your brush or pad at one end and take off at the other) dont go over what you have applied, if you miss a spot ignore it, you can hit it next time. Sand with 320g sand paper just to smooth between coats, can usually recoat in 2-3 hours. I rarely apply more than necessary to cover entirely(2-3 coats). They sell a product to slow down the drying
time for shellac(Homestead Finishing Products for one place) which would be useful where you live this time of year.

Regards
Jerry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
To add to what I said about shellac retarder, if you have trouble locating it(in a pinch) I have used a teaspoon of turpentine(not mineral spirits) to a quart of shellac as a retarter. Try mixing a small amount and appling to scrap wood first. This information was given me by an old furniture maker in the southwest corner of Kentucky many years ago. I haven't met anyone yet who ever heard of such a thing.

Enjoy the adventure

Jerry
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Kevin, regardless of which finish you choose clean your wood with acetone just prior to applying it. This removes the excess oil and allows all finishes to take hold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, Mike. That's a great tip. I use acetone prior to gluing oily woods, and finishing all woods. Jerry, as always, you came through for me. I'm on vacation for a couple of weeks & won't be in the shop. I will post pics when I get back and finish.
Kevin
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top