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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have what seems like an old router in our shop and it needs replaced. I have tried a few places but noone seems to know where to look. Any help with Identification (manufacturer, model number...) would be greatly appreciated. Pics are listed below:
 

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It might be easier to put new bearings and brushes in that old router than to find a new router that will fit in that over arm accessory. Bearings are not made by the tool manufacturer. Each has a number, usually on the side covers, that will allow you to order replacements from many baring sources. For brushes, taking the old ones to one of the better hardware stores that carry a wide variety of small parts should get you a close match to the originals, but you may need to file one edge to achieve the perfect size. Filing a brush is easy, since the carbon is soft, but the job is very messy since the black carbon filings will make you look like a coal miner if you aren't prepared. A vacuum cleaner hose held close enough to catch the filings is the best way to minimize the mess.

If your router needs more than bearings or brushes, your next option will be to try to find a router with a motor that is the exact same diameter as this one, so it can be clamped in the accessory bracket. Another option to consider is how to modify the accessory to fit a new and readily available router.

I think your original router might be a Stanley and they quit making routers and supporting the ones that they had sold many years ago. To me, the design looks something like routers that were being made in the 50's and early 60's.


Welcome to Router Forums N/a. Please take the time to edit your profile so we will at least be able to address you by a proper first name. We already have too many N/a members here, but it would also help if you can provide some more information about you, your woodworking tools, and abilities. We frequently use this to provide better answers to any questions that you may ask.

Charley

Charley
 

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If you repair it, life's easy. However, finding a replacement the same size might be a challenge. But you could use some aluminum to use to shim a new router to fit that device. Measure the diameter and then visit a store and measure the new stuff. Closest size wins, although many of the new routers are pretty much the same diameter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It won't accept a garden variety router.... The current one has screw threads on the housing for the fine adjustment... The router itself will need replaced but with the threads stripped, it would require a replacement. I think we're gonna make some changes to the end of the arm and outfit it with a different mechanism for fine adjustment that allows any router to be mounted in it....
 

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It looks to me like there are some serious cracks in the support arm near the router clamp that need welding. If that's the case then have the fabricator change the clamp to a flat platform instead. You would then be able to attach any router to the platform. You'll lose a little cut height but you would never have to worry about finding parts for an obsolete router again.
 

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We have what seems like an old router in our shop and it needs replaced. I have tried a few places but noone seems to know where to look. Any help with Identification (manufacturer, model number...) would be greatly appreciated. Pics are listed below:
It's a Stanley R5 or later derivation of it. The nodel type dates back to the 1930s. Stanley eventually stopped making them in the 1970s. Stanley Works sold off the power tool division to Bosch in about 1980m or 81 but most of the industrial routers (which were in any case very old designs) disappeared from production very quickly.
 

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It won't accept a garden variety router.... The current one has screw threads on the housing for the fine adjustment... The router itself will need replaced but with the threads stripped, it would require a replacement. I think we're gonna make some changes to the end of the arm and outfit it with a different mechanism for fine adjustment that allows any router to be mounted in it....
It looks like you are using it to route stone/marble? It must have been an industrial strength router to withstand the abrasive dust for this long.

You may want to contact a company such as:PERSKE : ROUTING
There are several companies that supply industrial router motors on the internet..

Herb
 

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It looks like you are using it to route stone/marble? It must have been an industrial strength router to withstand the abrasive dust for this long.
The original Stanley-Carter R5s were built like the proverbial brick dunny, Herb. Very over-engineered.
 
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