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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi everyone - just got here and looking for help. im working on converting a steel cabinet into a gun case. i'm working on the floor and need some advise.

i have 4 racks [front to back] holding 7 rifles each. 2 side racks and a center rack double sided. these are already cut and finished out of 1" premium pine.

the floor is framed of 1x3 stock divided into 4 sections with each section having a sloped 1/4 ply floor dadoed into the sides and dividers [slope recieves the butt ends squarely]. the plan is to use hidden dadoes to connect the frame together, but am not sure how to go about cutting them.

i could do it on the radial arm and have 'em all line up nice but they would be tru joints. would like to use the router, but having a mind block on setting it up. getting the measure right - tho it's only 2 1x3's and five cuts per piece then the three dividers and two end pieces........

my router experience has been rounding edge work and simple decoritive off-sets on deck posts. this dado stuff has me intimidated.

how to measure - what type of bits - cutting the dividers

any help?????????????
 

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Can you provide a sketch or photo of what you have? It sounds like you want mortise and tenon rather than a dado. You are looking for a strong joint with a nice clean appearance? It is also possible you want a sliding dovetail joint. Without a clearer image of what you are trying to do it's tough to give the right answer. Are these 1 x 3"s the top and bottom? If so you might save a bunch of work by using Miller dowels. The Miller dowel system uses a special stepped drill bit which is progressively smaller towards the end. You simply drill and insert a Miller dowel with glue on it. Tap it firmly in place and remove the excess dowel. Two of these per joint would be plenty strong. View them here: http://www.millerdowel.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1x3's make up the bottom.

over all 36"wx24"dx3"h. strength is not an issue.

i need to dado across the 3" of a 1x3.

one at each end and three spaced across the middle dividing the bottom into four sections. looking to cut a blind dado so it does not show from looking down on the finished piece. gluing and clamping will provide enough strength. needs to be dadoed 'cause the floor [1/4 ply] will be inserted into grooves dadoed into the sides of each cross piece.

so the question is how to set up to cut 5 blind dadoes across a 1x3. need ideas on setting up a jig to be able to get the dimensions correct.
 

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Krimson

Rick and Bob made a neat jig for just what you want to do.
It was a plastics base that had a 1" slot down the center (base was about 1/4" x12" x 14") with two hold down clamps and a back stop.
Once you have the jig made put a 1" brass guide in the router table,remove the fence,put you stock in the jig and push it into the bit and stop when you want to.
Turn off the router and reset stock for the next dado and do the same thing again until you have all the cuts done.

It looks something like the one below but not as big.
http://www.routerforums.com/showthread.php?t=2711
this one is for the plunge router but it can be used on the router table.
But I'm sure you will get it.

Also they had one on the http://www.thewoodworkingchannel.com/ that was neat but it took alot of work to make that one, Rick and Bob's is quick and easy to make and it works.


Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the inspiration. i'm making a small jig to use w/ a light weight ryobi trim router. i'll post a pic when i get it together - but i've absolutily no idea how to do that.

basically it's a fenced guide set up for a 3/8" straight cut bit. the guide base shows me my actual cut line a stop block stops the router for the blind return, and the other fenced guide brings the cutter back home.

the cool thing is that the two fenced guides are seperate and pivoted, so i can set the cut to the actual stock thinkness - and only need to set it to one guide [cut] line.

it's a little bugger seeing how i'm only routing a 3" width - but as things go in the shop, figurin' is the fun part.

so how do i post a pic?????????????????????????
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
short dado jig pics

here's what i came up with, works like a charm - i must say

pics show the parts - sizing the stock - finished - the cut - the fit [not the finished piece shown here]

this is hot off the press - looking for feedback on that ryobi i'm using. for small work i like it - easy to handle. have a full sized but kinda dig that little baby. seems to do the job.?
 

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krimson_cardnal said:
hi everyone - just got here and looking for help. im working on converting a steel cabinet into a gun case. i'm working on the floor and need some advise.

i have 4 racks [front to back] holding 7 rifles each. 2 side racks and a center rack double sided. these are already cut and finished out of 1" premium pine.

the floor is framed of 1x3 stock divided into 4 sections with each section having a sloped 1/4 ply floor dadoed into the sides and dividers [slope recieves the butt ends squarely]. the plan is to use hidden dadoes to connect the frame together, but am not sure how to go about cutting them.

i could do it on the radial arm and have 'em all line up nice but they would be tru joints. would like to use the router, but having a mind block on setting it up. getting the measure right - tho it's only 2 1x3's and five cuts per piece then the three dividers and two end pieces........

my router experience has been rounding edge work and simple decoritive off-sets on deck posts. this dado stuff has me intimidated.

how to measure - what type of bits - cutting the dividers

any help?????????????


Routing Trenches (Housing Joint). Dadoes
Trenching is a well-known joint used in carcass construction. Trenches can be cut on the circular saw or with the router in the router table. The router is the ultimate tool for producing trenches consistent in size. It is necessary to control the router when cutting such joints, and there are an assortment of jigs that can be constructed to give the operator control of the router when routing the trenches (Grooves). Take time to consider a few of the methods availableJig for Routing Trenches

1 This simple jig in the form of a ‘Tee Square’ is secured to the material with two clamps, and the base of the router is run against the blade of the jig to control the cutter.

The size of the jig will depend on the width of material to be cut. The blade should project beyond the width of material, and should be strong enough to prevent any ‘whipping’ of the blade. Before screwing together, rout a rebate on the underside of the blade 10mm x 3mm approx. Care should be taken to ensure the blade is at right angles to the fence

It will be necessary to locate the jig position to rout the groove. The required distance from the jig blade to the nearest side of the trench is 74mm. (This is the set-up required for the Makita 3612 0r 3612C with a base diameter of 160mm) and a 12mm cutter Measure your router base diameter and substitute the 160mm

Calculate jig position example:
Measure the diameter of the router base……160mm and
Subtract the diameter of the cutter 12mm
Balance.148mm
Divide the answer by 2 =74mm
Distance to the first edge of the groove 74mm


Routing Trenches
Clamp the jig to the material and the bench, place the router on the material, plunge until the cutter touches the material, and lock the carriage. Set the depth of cut and unlock the router carriage. With the cutter clear of the material plunge the router to the required depth and push the router away from you to complete the cut. Check for any imperfections, before removing the jig. When satisfied move the jig to the new location and repeat the procedure

Routing Trenches Jig No 2
Constructing jig N0 2 will give greater control of the router and prevent the router from ‘wandering’ from the edge. The jig consists of 4 pieces of material;
2/600 x 60 x 12mm MDF (rails)
1/400 x 60 x 19mm pine or 18mm MDF 1/300 x 60 x 19mm pine or 18mm MDF

The rails are glued and screwed in position. The material and jig are clamped to the bench. Because the router is controlled by the jig and therefore cannot ‘wander’ from the edge, it is possible to pull the router towards you.

Make a New Jig
With a little more consideration, a jig capable of trimming and routing a variety of trenches can be completed which is easier to use. This jig requires the use of a template guide. It is recommended that a 40mm guide is used to enable a greater variety of cutters to be used. With a slight variation, the same jig can also be used to rout a groove to insert biscuits on to the face of the board.

Template Guides
The guide issued with the router will restrict the size of cutter to approx 12mm therefore it is strongly recommended to purchase the 40mm guide if the new jig is to be constructed.
Very little information has been written on how the template guides are used and what projects are capable of being produced, when it is attached to the router.
 

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Krimson

"not sure - but this ain't working"

Do you mean your jig is not working Or you can't get your Pictures to post/uploaded to the forum ?

Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks template tom. good info on measuring, some times the simple stuff misses us. also am interested in figuring out those template guides. seems they should do the trick

also how did you put up those images??? i can't??????

gonna try one more time
 

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You did just fine KC. I'm looking forward to seeing the finished product posted under Show and Tell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
thanks mike - fortunatly the wood work goes smoother than the computer stuff - at least most of the time. do-overs in the shop are practice -- on the PC they're frustrating.

i'll post pics as i go along with this little project. interesting parts going to be providing four floor panels each at a 4d slope....
 

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krimson_cardnal said:
thanks template tom. good info on measuring, some times the simple stuff misses us. also am interested in figuring out those template guides. seems they should do the trick

also how did you put up those images??? i can't??????

gonna try one more time

The template guides work very well I have designed a dedicated jig for routing trenches which requires the use of a 40mm guide and a selection of cutters to suit the shelf thickness. Will produce a drawing and post it
Tom
 

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Tom is in the process of writing a book on the use of templates and guide bushings. Review some of his posts and you will see photo's of the projects built by his blind students, other jig designs and always the recommendation to use a 40 MM guide bushing which is not sold in the US. I am contacting Trend-UK to ask them to supply this product to their US division.
 
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