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I took a little job to shorten two bar stools 3". I wondering how you clever people would do that. I thought I'd lay them horizontally on a bench. Mark the cuts from the bottom. Clamp a track saw to two of the legs and cut the with my circular saw, flip it over and do the other two legs.

I'm sure you will have other ideas.

Thanks for looking. chair 298.jpg
 

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Dan's the man....
 

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Block under the two side rails so that the stool sits flat. Use a multi-tool with a fine tooth blade lying on top of a block of the appropriate height to score all four sides (prevents splintering as the blade comes through) and then cut each leg off, If the cuts need to be tweaked, tape four sheets of fine sandpaper to the bench top and scrub the stool back and forth as needed. This has worked for me. probably a fine tooth pull saw would work as well.

Tom
 

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Four 3" thick blocks...
through drill the block to accept the legs...
set the stool on a flat surface w/ the legs stuck in the holes..
weight the stool down.. the more the merrier..
if the stool rocks while weighted shim the two opposing short legs evenly...
washers dropped into the holes will work for this...
use the blocks as guides for your flush cutting saw and cut a leg...
move the block so that the cut leg rests on solid block...
do the next leg then the next and the next...
remove weight...
sand the cut edges to slight RO...
deliver the stool...
collect your loot...
buy me a beer and don't tell Dan... about the beer that is...
 

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I was going to say use a hand saw, the legs on a lot of tables are tapered/or slanted one way or another, and a power saw table can tilt the cut so as not follow the floor. 9 times out of ten after you cut them off they will rock, be uneven, so you will have to fine tune a couple of legs to have them set down tight.
To do this set the chair on a flat table, table saw or bench and see which legs diagonally are slightly long, then level them up by sliding equal shims under the short legs, this is the amount you have to cut off the long legs.
Hope that makes sense.
Herb
 

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Hey Berry, it looks like you got the answer you were looking for, but I wanted to suggest a tool to everyone that I think could work on this. A few months ago I purchased a Dremel Ultra Saw, it comes with offset blades so that you can "flush" cut with the saw on its side. I put the flush in quotes because it actually cuts about 1/16 higher than flush. Using the techniques above with this saw would work great, and it actually leaves a nice clean cut. I've found this tool to be a great purchase with countless possibilities. Ultra-Saw?
 

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Raising the bar means further to fall. My 1st bed frame was based on an old captains rack from the days of wooden ships. It had partial side rails and the top of the mattress was only 12" from the floor. I got tired of waking up on the floor and or with another bloody nose.
 

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@Ghidrah....

sounds like you'd do better w/ a sleeping bag on the floor and no mat...
 

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Even as a kid I had my bed against the wall and slept wedged against it, and I didn't drink back then. Once I built my Capn's bed frame I never fell out.

Cool trick sailors from medium to small ships use to remain in their racks while underway, many of the older military ships placed E1-6 berthing areas forward and stacked bunks 3 high along the bulkhead, unlike sissy ocifers and NCOs who bunked closer to midship in individual sissy racks.

Enlisted racks had metal posts at the corners fixed deck to overhead. Pretty much every guy slept with at least one arm and leg hooked around a post. I had a mid rack till a bottom one opened up, the 1st time we hit ice I woke up freaked out wedged between a cold clammy bulkhead and the bottom rack.

Waves are bad, ice is hell.
 

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Even as a kid I had my bed against the wall and slept wedged against it, and I didn't drink back then. Once I built my Capn's bed frame I never fell out.

Cool trick sailors from medium to small ships use to remain in their racks while underway, many of the older military ships placed E1-6 berthing areas forward and stacked bunks 3 high along the bulkhead, unlike sissy ocifers and NCOs who bunked closer to midship in individual sissy racks.

Enlisted racks had metal posts at the corners fixed deck to overhead. Pretty much every guy slept with at least one arm and leg hooked around a post. I had a mid rack till a bottom one opened up, the 1st time we hit ice I woke up freaked out wedged between a cold clammy bulkhead and the bottom rack.

Waves are bad, ice is hell.
another valid reason to stay on land...
 

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I was luckier than most lubbers, I didn't get seasick.
 

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I was luckier than most lubbers, I didn't get seasick.
did the troop ship in the 60's...
didn't sick from the sea...
the holds convert to hold 210 guys and head issues did...
 

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Yep, Phil, I thought of that after I posted. Or trash the stools and just install a brass rail on the floor.
 

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A surfacing board comes in handy on projects like this.

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SB-002.JPG

SB-003.jpg

SB-004.jpg

Surfacing board.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I followed the video link and the stools came out great. Thanks to everyone.
 
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