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I like the Padauk against the lighter wood (maple?) and the joints provide a great effect (different). Nice job and thanks for sharing.
 

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Nice use of figured wood Bob. And your top aligns nicely - one of those things that people don't think much about until they've actually built a box. You definitely have some good box building chops! Maybe you've got the same addiction I have.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Vince, its been a hard road, with many scrap bags filled with kindling (lol). But now I have taught myself enough to be at least content with the boxes. I am very critical of my own work which is why up till now I have been the shy retiring type.

Brad, yes, the Maple is a perfect contrast to the Padauk, I really like it.


Phil, I cheat. I build the box with extra high sides, glue the lid on, and then slice it on the bandsaw into base and lid. By the time I have cleaned up the two cuts its the right height. please dont think bad of me (g)
 

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Why would I think bad? (Yeah, I know it was a joke) You got to the point where you have something you are proud of. I'm sure you have a dozen things you'd do differently but that's the sign of a serious WWer.

There's an old expression in the tech world that something is "good enough to criticize". While it may seem negative, it's actually high praise. So, when I build, I aim for good enough to criticize.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I want to clarify my confession a little. On THIS box I sliced the lid off later. On my first box with the box joints I did make the lid after the box.

I find it annoying when I know the faults because i built it, but then my wife and friends say "its lovely" and I say "but look at this corner here, and that join there"
And this is supposed to be a relaxing hobby.
 

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I want to clarify my confession a little. On THIS box I sliced the lid off later. On my first box with the box joints I did make the lid after the box.

I find it annoying when I know the faults because i built it, but then my wife and friends say "its lovely" and I say "but look at this corner here, and that join there"
And this is supposed to be a relaxing hobby.
SLICING THE LID OFF LATER, I thought that was the only way to do a box. :smile:

Herb
 

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I want to clarify my confession a little. On THIS box I sliced the lid off later. On my first box with the box joints I did make the lid after the box.

I find it annoying when I know the faults because i built it, but then my wife and friends say "its lovely" and I say "but look at this corner here, and that join there"
And this is supposed to be a relaxing hobby.
Bob we are our own worst critics but that's because we always think we can do better. Enjoy the hobby - it's a learning process.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Herb, from now I shall slice the lid whenever possible. It gives very good results.
That first one with the comb joints i couldnt because my cutter bit only cuts 5. So I had to make the lid afterwards, but it was a very time consuming process matching each side.
If I had a table saw and could cut more joints at one go i would do that.
 

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I want to clarify my confession a little. On THIS box I sliced the lid off later. On my first box with the box joints I did make the lid after the box.

I find it annoying when I know the faults because i built it, but then my wife and friends say "its lovely" and I say "but look at this corner here, and that join there"
And this is supposed to be a relaxing hobby.
A good WWer knows where every fault is. Frankly, we are our own worst critics. And, WWers are some of the most humble people I know. But, this is good because it makes us strive to improve. The more we build, the more we see how to avoid the mistakes. I doubt I will ever get to the point where I make none but the journey is a reward by itself.
 

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You are producing some really great looking boxes, Bob.
 
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Herb, from now I shall slice the lid whenever possible. It gives very good results.
That first one with the comb joints i couldnt because my cutter bit only cuts 5. So I had to make the lid afterwards, but it was a very time consuming process matching each side.
If I had a table saw and could cut more joints at one go i would do that.
I have done that, make the lid separate, but like you said it is a lot of fussing around to get a perfect fit.
I have never used this type of bit to make boxes. Can you make the sides twice as tall and turn them over and do the top part after you have done the bottom? then assemble the box and cut the top off?
Do you stack one side in front of the other and do 2 at a time,or 4 at a time?

Herb
 

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Phil, on the subject of wipe on poly again. I have now seen you tubes which say to mix equal parts of poly and thinners to make your own. I have been using 75% poly to 25% thinners. maybe this is why I'm having problems with runs?
That seems likely. While making it thinner seems intuitively that there would be more runs, the thicker the finish, the slower it's going to move so you won't see it right away.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Herb
The bit is normally used to make 90 degree angles. theres a set of different sized bearings for the bottom to allow for different thicknesses of wood, and normally you just set the cutter centre to half the thickness of the wood panel in front of the fence and slide the wood into the cutter untill the bearing stops it.

To do a 45 degree I had to get a bit inventive. you need much longer combs to allow for the angle, so I made a 45 degree slider out of a piece of old 2" thick worktop. Then used a toggle clamp to hold the pieces in the same place on the jig each time, and set the cutter so that the slider went all the way across without hitting the lower bearing.

using one panel at a time, its very quick to clamp it onto the jig, slide the jig far enough across for the panel to pass completely across the cutters, and pull the jig to me away from the cutters. flip the piece over and run the other side through.
It could be possible to clamp several pieces together i suppose, but there would be a big risk of the cutters tearing out wood in the wrong places.

I did look at making the panel double thickness to get 10 combs instead of five, but to make the 45 degrees this way it means making a mirror image jig and pushing the wood through backwards with the edge coming out last. I started to make the jig for this but time pressed in on me a bit and i shelved it for another day. It could be possible to make two x 5 comb pieces and butt joint them. More future plans!

A table saw would produce perfect clean cuts that i think would have a better appearance than this cutter, but i dont have a table saw so this is as good as it gets for me.
 

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Bob, that is some premium work...
the character and warmth is outstanding...
 
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