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this your creation Dave???
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Stick - Yes, it was originally made to machine curved mandolin faces. It was produced using DIY tools- largest drilled hole is 1/2". The uprights are 12mm round bar, router rails are 8mm round bar threaded m8 at one end, crossheads from 1"sq aluminium x 230mm long. Crosshead pinch bolts are m8 for uprights and m6 for router rails. Uprights are secured to board with m6 countersunk screws. Everything is adjustable and a fence can be fitted to board for normal machining.
Regards
dave
 

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nicely done...
many here refer to those as skis...
search ''ski'' w/ an extended date and watch out...
 

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This is a DIY routing setup for cutting small circular pieces used for hubs for whirligig propelle View attachment 239154 rs. The timber is located on a small pin which allows it to be rotated into the cutter.

@pinehunter

So, for the operation shown, the router remains stationary and the wood is rotated around the 1/4" locator pin? Do you cut almost through the wood with the router and then finish off the operation by hand? If not, you must have a pretty steady hand to not "bump" the cutter as the outer part is cut loose.
 

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@pinehunter

So, for the operation shown, the router remains stationary and the wood is rotated around the 1/4" locator pin? Do you cut almost through the wood with the router and then finish off the operation by hand? If not, you must have a pretty steady hand to not "bump" the cutter as the outer part is cut loose.
Same questions here. And we need more pics in different angles.
 

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Hi tomp913 - The timber is located on a pin 2.5mm in dia. The router is adjusted to the hub size and clamped. The dark square of material under the pine acts as a spelch piece and the cutter is adjusted to penetrate 1-2mm into it and complete the cutting. The trick is to gang cut pieces so that hands are well away from the cutter as the timber is rotated . During the last section of cutting the pin holds the circular piece in alignment with the cutter. The waste may come into contact with the cutter but you should be able to prevent this by firmly holding the waste. I have a trick to make 2.5mm pins that screw into base board if needed.

Regards
dave
 

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Hi tomp913 - The timber is located on a pin 2.5mm in dia. The router is adjusted to the hub size and clamped. The dark square of material under the pine acts as a spelch piece and the cutter is adjusted to penetrate 1-2mm into it and complete the cutting. The trick is to gang cut pieces so that hands are well away from the cutter as the timber is rotated . During the last section of cutting the pin holds the circular piece in alignment with the cutter. The waste may come into contact with the cutter but you should be able to prevent this by firmly holding the waste. I have a trick to make 2.5mm pins that screw into base board if needed.

Regards
dave
An interesting approach Dave. Most others are rotating the router around the circle. I agree no matter which way you do it the work should be secured to a sacrificial surface under it. Some pin all the way through into it and others use double sided tape.
 

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Hi tomp913 - The timber is located on a pin 2.5mm in dia. The router is adjusted to the hub size and clamped. The dark square of material under the pine acts as a spelch piece and the cutter is adjusted to penetrate 1-2mm into it and complete the cutting. The trick is to gang cut pieces so that hands are well away from the cutter as the timber is rotated . During the last section of cutting the pin holds the circular piece in alignment with the cutter. The waste may come into contact with the cutter but you should be able to prevent this by firmly holding the waste. I have a trick to make 2.5mm pins that screw into base board if needed.

Regards
dave
Not sure that my hands (or nerves) are that steady any more. Based on a method used by @harrysin, I came up with the idea of using pins in the support board to retain the parts while routing. I drilled 3/4" holes in the support to accept short pieces of 3/4" dowel with a double-ended blind nail in the end, With the spacing adjusted to match the part being cut - to miss the router bit - the ends of the nails hold the parts securely for routing. I've used this to put roundovers on the edges of small plywood rings as well as to cut larger rings out of a piece of plywood.
 

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