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David - Machinist in wood
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This is more of a tip than anything else but this is as good a place to post this as any, I guess -

It occurred to me this afternoon as I reached for a couple of the wedges I keep handy that maybe this isn't a normal 'go-to' for some folks so I thought I would share this. Often I find myself needing to support a long piece for driving screws, chiseling, drilling, etc. and sometimes there just isn't a convenient way to do this. So, a long time ago (eons) I cut a dozen wedges of Maple to use for jacking a suitable block to support another piece. The photos below will far better explain what I'm rambling about -

42" long piece of Walnut and needing to chisel out for hinges but to support the piece I would have to cut a block to fit. Or, I could grab a block, two wedges, and the block now is very tight and exactly the right size for support -

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If you already do this then great; if you don't it doesn't take long to cut a handful of these hardwood wedges to have ready for when you need them. There are other ways to do this, of course, but this is quick and easy and doesn't require any cutting or tools - just grab what's handy and go on to the task at hand. I keep a few of them on my tablesaw fence because they also come in handy if a board is trying to close up on you and pinch the blade. You can probably go back and look at some of the photos and videos I've posted and see them right there and handy.

David
 

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Some good tips here. I've been finding these shims very handy too: Polypropylene Shims - Lee Valley Tools They were selling smaller sets for $4 but I don't see that package anymore. I've been using them to set door heights on cupboards so I can accurately mark hinge locations. The thinnest ones are only 1/32" thick so you can do some fine tuning with them.
 

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Some good tips here. I've been finding these shims very handy too: Polypropylene Shims - Lee Valley Tools They were selling smaller sets for $4 but I don't see that package anymore. I've been using them to set door heights on cupboards so I can accurately mark hinge locations. The thinnest ones are only 1/32" thick so you can do some fine tuning with them.
I have a set of these, and you're correct, they are very handy. The photo shows them being used to check size/spacing of some small drawer fronts before assembly and attaching to the drawers.
 

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I have a tray for handy items that hooks on to my rip fence and in it you will several wedges of different sizes. I use them primarily on my out feed table so I can use bench dogs as clamps. They often come in handy for other things as well.
 

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I've carried a dozen or so beech packers around in my tool box for years (maple is a rarity here). Useful for all sorts of things - even if it's just for wedging doors open. The other absolute must in a carpenters tool box over here is a selection of plastic "horseshoe" packers (or shims) which are used to install joinery work but which can equally be used to measure and set stuff such as door reveals, plunge depths on routers, etc. They come in 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 10mm thicknesses, all colour coded:
 

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"If you leave a buffet hungry, it's your own fault"

Lots of great tips here...thanks for starting this, David...
 
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