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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

New to the forum, primarily in search of a little help. I have the aforementioned Skil 1825, and I'm finding that the 1/2" to 1/4" collet adapter either doesn't hold the bit tightly enough, or I have to crimp it on so hard with channel locks that I can't get the bit out without putting a screwdriver in the slot. I think part of my learning process was to try to go too deep on a single pass, and as a consequence the adapter would slip and the bit rise up, and somewhere along the way the adapter has become badly scored or maybe just out of round.

I thought I'd simply replace the adapter with a new one, so bought a generic one from a local supplier. It fits in the collet, but try as I might it won't tighten, either in the router or with the channel locks. So I'm left wondering if there's a requirement for a Skil 1825-specific replacement - there's one on Amazon.ca at $58.90, which strikes me as less than a good deal. Alternatively, could I just replace the entire collet with a 1/4" one and not need an adapter? I have only a couple of 1/2" bits, so no great loss.

Question then is, can I replace the entire collet, and if so, is there a Skil-specific replacement, or could I use someone else's version? If I can't replace the whole thing, is there an alternative to spending $58.90 on Amazon? I've searched both local sources and the web with no success to date.

Any suggestions gratefully received!
 

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...you may know this already but do not bottom the bit; put it all the way in and then raise it about 1/8". This will make sure the bit does not bottom as you tighten it and stopping the collet/adapter from doing it's job. The bit will move towards the router as you tighten it...give it a bit of room...
 
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Welcome to the forum. The care and use of a router needs careful study before using it for the first time. Stick will likely post with some very good information that should be required reading. Bit placement and speed are extremely important. As you've already been advised, if you didn't know already, inserting the cutter all the way and raising it slightly is the proper method of installation. It makes a big difference and is a safety concern as well. Don't try to make a cutter deeper by moving it out near the end of the shaft, get a longer or more appropriate profile cutter. Much more advice and concerns will follow with PDFs and the such to help you along. For now I'd look at the link above for the ereplacements chuck and get at least the original chuck made for that tool. If you use 1/4" cutters then install the 1/4" collet, use the 1/2" for 1/2" bits.
 

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Collets are really precision devices. A they really tighten only a fraction of a mm. I'd try ereplacement parts--they have a lot of stuff. I'd also contact Skill to ask whether they have the part.
 

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Paul
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Personally, I wouldn't use channel locks on a collet. Some collets, once loosened, need to be loosened more. As you loosen further you feel resistance again and that is when it is letting go of the bit (no need for a screwdriver). As has been mentioned: Make sure the bit isn't bottomed out, when tightening it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I did some further digging. Couldn't find anywhere in Canada, but did find "Bosch/Skil Adapter #BSH-1619X03843" on partswarehouse.com, so I ordered three. So many sites won't ship to Canada still, and the Canadian sites for Walmart and Newegg carry much less inventory than the US equivalents. Never thought I'd find such things on Newegg, of all places. So, a couple of weeks until they get here and I should be good to go again. Thanks for the suggestion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I wouldn't have used channel locks if there was any other way. It seemed to be the only way I could the bit not to slip, but then I'd have to use the screwdriver pressed clockwise whilst rotating the bit anti-clockwise to get it out again. Even resorted to positioning over a vise and using a nail to hammer out a very narrow bit on a couple of occasions. Needless to say, I'm not entirely proud of my methods to date. I'll see if I can fare a little better with new, un-abused collet adapters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Welcome to the forum. The care and use of a router needs careful study before using it for the first time. Stick will likely post with some very good information that should be required reading. Bit placement and speed are extremely important. As you've already been advised, if you didn't know already, inserting the cutter all the way and raising it slightly is the proper method of installation. It makes a big difference and is a safety concern as well. Don't try to make a cutter deeper by moving it out near the end of the shaft, get a longer or more appropriate profile cutter. Much more advice and concerns will follow with PDFs and the such to help you along. For now I'd look at the link above for the ereplacements chuck and get at least the original chuck made for that tool. If you use 1/4" cutters then install the 1/4" collet, use the 1/2" for 1/2" bits.
Yup, thanks to all for the advice, and I'll take a little more care of all aspects from here on in. As to 1/4" collets, rather than adapters, just how exchangeable are they? This router has a plate that can be pushed in to immobilize the motor, which implies flats at the base of the collet, and I have no idea if that's a common thing or not. I've yet to find a 1/4" collet specific to this router - I think one site listed one as outdated, no replacement available, none in stock, but that's the closest I've come. There are Bosch collets available, but I don't know if they'd work with this router.
 

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Paul
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Many routers have a "spindle lock", so you only need one wrench for the collet. My Bosch has separate collets but I have no idea if they are interchangeable. Collets can be specific to the router but some brands appear to use the same. I think it was CherryvilleChuck that had some info on that.

The insert could be distorted, hopefully those ones you ordered will work for you.
 

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Theo
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the Canadian sites for Walmart and Newegg carry much less inventory than the US equivalents.
You don't go to Walmart to find the unusual. You shop Walmart online. You want bagpipes, they have bagpipes. You want mustache wax, they have mustache wax. You want @#$%^s, they have @#$%^s.
 

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Many routers have a "spindle lock", so you only need one wrench for the collet. My Bosch has separate collets but I have no idea if they are interchangeable. Collets can be specific to the router but some brands appear to use the same. I think it was CherryvilleChuck that had some info on that.

The insert could be distorted, hopefully those ones you ordered will work for you.
There are 20 something different routers that use the same collet as the Bosch 1617. Hitachi and Dewalt are two other makers that use the same ones in many models. I have an old DW 610 and it used a older Bosch collet, I think a WK model. I believe that there might be a few that use PC collets too. One outfit I'm not sure about is Ryobi and they made most of Sears routers. The Sears routers seemed to be different from most others and most or all are no longer available. Maybe if you posted a picture we could see if it resembles one that we are more familiar with.
 
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