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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking for a wood glue that does not go off as quick as the one I am using.
I use Bison D3 for everything, and most of the year its absolutely fine.
But come the summer, it sets so quickly that its closer to superglue. I dont get time to adjust or alter anything before its rigid.
This is bad because as I apply clamps, it creeps as well. by the time I have three or more clamps on, if i see it has moved and release the clamps to adjust, its too late.

So What do you Floridians (and other hot states) use in high summer?

To give an idea, I am in around a 100 degree F for about 4 months of the year.
 

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salt granules are tiny...
refrigerate but don't freeze the glue before use..
 
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Bob - I've also heard that a sprinkle of salt prevents creep. I've never tried so can't comment specifically whether it works or not..

Titebond makes "Titebond Extend". See the link below. Again I've never used it as I've not needed it. For outdoor projects or projects like cutting boards that may be exposed to water, I've used Titebond III, for everything else I've used either Titebond II or Gorilla wood glue.

On some recent cutting boards I used Titebond III and found that the set up time was long enough to allow me to get the boards in place.

Titebond - Product
 

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In the summer my shop probably sees temps that high. But for years now my glue of choice is Titebond II. I often don' t clamp it, just put weights on the pieces. Or, on rare occasions, just stick the pieces together and set them aside where they won't get hit or bumped. I've not timed how long it takes to set, my usual practice is to let it set overnight. I do know that I can handle glued pieces after maybe 15-20 minutes.

One thing I would do in your position would be to contact the people that make the glue. Whether it is your present glue, or others. I've contacted the Titebond people several times and they were always able to give me a satisfactory answer to my questions. I don't know about where you are, but here there is normally a toll free number on the label you can call.
 
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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I cant find any titebond on the island so far. i have a couple shops to check but they are a day out to reach and return. The language is a barrier with the smaller shops and itas best to go look at what they have on the shelves. Titebond 111 is promoted as having extended set time. I shall have to go for a ride i think.

Just been surfing and found the sole supplier of titebond in cyprus. Of course they are half way across the island, but to be fair, thats only about an hours drive on the motorway.
Now I just have to find time in my busy schedule....
 

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I live in the desert where we hit 100 f most summer days. Titebond III is my glue of choice. I've looked at info on the extender they make, but have not used it. Our heat is very dry. When it's hot, I run the AC in there, but only while I am in the shop. I like that open time. Regular Titebond sticks solid in 2-3 minutes in the heat here.
 

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Hah, knew I had something on the Titebond glues saved. An interesting read, in my opinion, whether you opt for Titebond or not.
The Titebond Glue Family - NewWoodworker.com LLC I'll just keep on using Titebond II because it does what I want, and I like it. Probably will never even try Titebond III, unless I build a boat, then I may. And plain Titebond just doesn't appeal to me at all for some reason, never has. I would not buy their hide glue tho, if I wanted some I would probably make my own from gelatin.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
hmm, that raises another question.
11 dries clear, but 111 dries light brown and extend dries yellow.

How much would that affect the finished look? If I'm gluing up walnut, last thing i want is a yellow glue line.
On the other hand if I'm gluing up maple, I dont want a brown glue line.

original is the only one that dries clear, and that has the same properties as the one I'm already using.
 

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Found this. Perhaps it would be easier to get some of this rather than Titebond. I like the Titebond II partly because it dries sort of amber looking. I thin it down, and give my canes several coats of it. Seems to be holding up quite well.
Home - Bison Seems to be lots of info.

There is a translucent Titebond, but I think it dries faster than you are after.

I just thought of this. Perhaps you could do at least some of your gluing in the house. Should be lower temps. Maybe glue in the shop after the sun goes down and it cools off some. In colder weather I do glue ups in the house.
 
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For outdoor projects I always go with epoxy, since I've had the best luck with it.
For slower set times on inside work I use Titebond Extend. I make quite a few boxes with box joints and dovetails. The Titebond Extend is the only ready mixed glue that has let me get them fully together before setting up. I don't even have to play "Race The Clock". I always leave them in the clamps until the following day. The Titebond Extend is much like Titebond II, but is white in color when wet and dries relatively clear. I've never had a glue failure with it, but I don't use it where it will get wet or sit out in the Sun all day.

Charley
 

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SUNNYBOB: Do you guys have a version of Amazon over there. You can get most anything from them delivered to your door. +1 on the Titebond glues.
 

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Titbond colors when dry, from their website:

What are the resulting colors when the Titebond Wood Glues dry?

Titebond III Ultimate – light brown
Titebond Original – yellow
Titebond II Premium – translucent yellow
Titebond Dark – brown
Titebond Liquid Hide – transparent amber
Titebond Melamine – colorless
Titebond No-Run, No-Drip – transparent with a light brown tint
Titebond Polyurethane – yellowish amber
Titebond Translucent – colorless
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Tom, therin lies the problem. CharleyL says 11 is white and dries clear. Titebond website disagrees. Do I listen to the website, or some one who actually uses it to make boxes?
Its not even as simple as picking a glue for a dark or light wood. As you know, I make a lot of stuff with contrasting layers. last thing I want is a coloured glue line all across several shades of wood.
I really need a clear glue that takes 10 minutes to set, but does not need mixing before applying.
 

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I'm looking for a wood glue that does not go off as quick as the one I am using.
I use Bison D3 for everything, and most of the year its absolutely fine.
But come the summer, it sets so quickly that its closer to superglue. I dont get time to adjust or alter anything before its rigid.
This is bad because as I apply clamps, it creeps as well. by the time I have three or more clamps on, if i see it has moved and release the clamps to adjust, its too late.

So What do you Floridians (and other hot states) use in high summer?

To give an idea, I am in around a 100 degree F for about 4 months of the year.
It must be really good. Amazon has the 250g bottle for 109.99 shipped.

I have used salt to keep boards from slipping for a long time. Just use very little.
 

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somewhere in here I posted a hands on comparison of different wood glues dried. Of all the glues,, Weldbond and Elmer's School glue dried clear. Non of the Titebonds dried clear. Open time on the Weldbond is relatively quick compared to Titebond. I liked the Weldbond but on complex glueup's the open time was a killer. The Elmer's School glue is great..but not necessarily something I"d use on wood projects.
 
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