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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi:

How can I use a router to cut small "rings" out of 3/4 inch hardwood. Typical ring would be Inner diameter of 1" and outer diameter of 2 1/2".

Thanks

Old1eye
 

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MLCS has a circle template for sale in its bargain bin that includes sizes that should serve your purposes. Use it with template guides and straight plunge bits should do the trick. I am sure there are suppliers other than MLCS that have such circle templates.
 

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Old one eye (I hope that isn't a description of a disability), there are various methods to achieve what you require, one easy method came to mind so I went into my shed to prove it, here are the results. Unfortunately I have a poor memory so, instead of writing down your measurements, I "memorised " them,and not very well, I had in mind OD 2'' & ID 3/4", after making one I realised it should have been 2 1/2" OD and 3/4" ID, I know, still wrong but anyway the method allows you to make any size and combination you could ever want. The scrap MDF that I used is thinner than your specs. but that's of no consequence, just rout in easy steps, in hardwood about 4mm or so per cut.
 

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Hi old1eye

Sometimes the router is not the right tool for the job I would suggest using hole saw cutters ...

Just need to clamp the stock on the drill press and use two hole saws.
And just that quick you have your donut :)

But I don't like to clamp the stock down on most of them , I just drill the small hole 1st and but only 1/2 the way and then put the big cutter in the chuck and cut out the big one from both sides then put the small cutter back in place and cut the small hole out once I flip it over to get a nice clean cut on both sides of the donut... :)



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Hi:

How can I use a router to cut small "rings" out of 3/4 inch hardwood. Typical ring would be Inner diameter of 1" and outer diameter of 2 1/2".

Thanks

Old1eye
 

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I did consider two hole saws Bj. but discarded the idea because a 2 1/2" high quality bi-metal hole saw isn't cheap and the low cost Asian hole saws would find it hard work to make multiple rings in 3/4" hardwood. But I did say that there were different ways to achieve the desired result, let us stand by for further ideas.
 

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Hi Harry

Your right about the price on the hole saws, I have got many over the years and most of them are Lenox I get them from the flea markets the norm :) or garage sales, the last one was a 4" one for 10.oo bucks and a 6" one for 15.oo bucks the 2 1/2" ones are about the same..or just a bit lower....

How about a band saw and a FORSTER BIT,,, 1/4" hole for a dowel pin and then spin the blank on the band saw then just drill the center hole with the forster bit ...


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I did consider two hole saws Bj. but discarded the idea because a 2 1/2" high quality bi-metal hole saw isn't cheap and the low cost Asian hole saws would find it hard work to make multiple rings in 3/4" hardwood. But I did say that there were different ways to achieve the desired result, let us stand by for further ideas.
 

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"How about a band saw and a FORSTER BIT,,, 1/4" hole for a dowel pin and then spin the blank on the band saw then just drill the center hole with the forster bit ..."

That certainly is a method that works but does our friend have a band saw?
 

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Harry,
What, no pictures with the circle cutting jig? A very important piece me thinks.

Your idea of the center plug solved my question. I wouldn't have thought of that. You can make that plug with the circle cutter on the router too although under an inch might not be advised. Great thing is you don't have to buy any additional tools as long as you have the router (I assume we all do since we're on this board) and a straight bit. You can even make the circle cutting jig yourself.

My problem using the hole saws is that I have never had a decent finish on the cut even when I cut it from both sides. Plus the material always has a nasty habit of getting lodged in place.
 

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Harry,
What, no pictures with the circle cutting jig? A very important piece me thinks.

Your idea of the center plug solved my question. I wouldn't have thought of that. You can make that plug with the circle cutter on the router too although under an inch might not be advised. Great thing is you don't have to buy any additional tools as long as you have the router (I assume we all do since we're on this board) and a straight bit. You can even make the circle cutting jig yourself.

My problem using the hole saws is that I have never had a decent finish on the cut even when I cut it from both sides. Plus the material always has a nasty habit of getting lodged in place.
As you said, a 1" plug is rather small for routing but certainly possible by making a simple crude jig consisting of no more than a strip of Acrylic or even thin MDF fixed to the base of the router with a panel pin going through it exactly 1" from the edge of the cutter. The pin is tapped into the material and the router rotated around it. I made the jig shown about 7 years ago, it was designed by a fellow member and is as good as they get in as much as it is infinitely variable, most jigs go up in fixed increments. Like you, I have never had a perfect result from a hole saw, they're fine for making holes in cabinets for cables the pass through and that's about it for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Harry Sin (I hope that isn't a description of a theological or moral issue!), thanks for your idea of using a plug. I am going to try that out. I'm also going to try a variation of the circle cutting jig as well. I'll let you know how things turn out.

Regards

Old1eye
 

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I love you're sense of humour Old1eye, even though I was being serious in my remarks, the fact that you intend to try new methods indicates to me that you are not ONE EYED when problem solving. I look forward to seeing your finished rings.
 

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Harry, You are using imperial measurements without also stating the metric equivalent!! 2 in is 5 cm; 24 in is 61 cm. How will Her Majesty be able to implement her retraction of our (US) grant of independence if we do not get used to metric measurements?

I must I am very chagrined that I have to teach metric measurements to college freshman!

Actually, your jigs are probably the most versatile for small circles; certainly they allow smaller circles than the Oak-Park circle (3 in; 7.5 cm)
 

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Tom, I'm in an invidious position, I'm friends with everyone and some understand metric, others only imperial and still others both,so I choose whichever I think will best suit the recipient. I know Tom, I'm one hell of a Mr. nice guy, I just can't help it!
I must hasten to mention that I still have imperial drills, mills, chisels, hole saws,router cutters etc. and if I'm designing a project for the imperial router forums, I use imperial where possible. For my next routing project, I'll let you choose metric or imperial Tom, so please let me know.
 

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Harry, I try to always use both imperial and metric, one stated as I think appropriate for the recipient and the the other in parentheses immediately following for those who think and work in that system. My day job requires that I switch back and forth.

Yes, you are one hell of a Mr. Nice Guy who possesses amazing skills both with specific tools and with a broad range of woodworking tools, and who is always showing interesting projects or providing insightful and informative answers.

I just want the US to be prepared for becoming part of Her Majesty's kingdom again, as you told us would happen. (She might want to wait about two months or at most about three months)
 

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Tom, I'm in an invidious position, I'm friends with everyone and some understand metric, others only imperial and still others both,so I choose whichever I think will best suit the recipient. I know Tom, I'm one hell of a Mr. nice guy, I just can't help it!
in·vid·i·ous
1. calculated to create ill will or resentment or give offense; hateful: invidious remarks.
2. offensively or unfairly discriminating; injurious: invidious comparisons.
3. causing or tending to cause animosity, resentment, or envy: an invidious honor.
4. Obsolete. envious.

Come on Harry, not you?:confused::eek:;):D
 

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Number three was my intended meaning Dave, I felt that I was in a position where I could cause resentment by using the "wrong" type of measurements. Things have improved in the time that I have been a member of the forum, I shan't speculate as to the possible reason. I hope you didn't strain yourself lifting that huge dictionary that I know you have, I can't remember if you have a tractor like Terry!
 

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Thanks for your delightful comments Tom. When designing projects and the templates that go with them, the measurements do have to be in one or the other most of the time. A 40mm template guide used with a 10mm cutter will give an off-set of 15mm., not quite the same as 1.57" guide and a 0.39" cutter giving an off-set of 0.59". Who would have a guide or cutter of these sizes, not even Bj.! Occasionally where an exact fit, for say a lid is required, this can often be done by mixing imperial/metric template guide and or cutter.
 

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This is probably well past the date of interest but Lee Valley sell an excellent small circle jig. I use it with success. I am not allowed to post links yet but their web site is easily searched.
 

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This is probably well past the date of interest but Lee Valley sell an excellent small circle jig. I use it with success. I am not allowed to post links yet but their web site is easily searched.
Hi crquack:

Welcome to the forum!

The Lee Valley Tools page for the small-circle jig is http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=40970&cat=1,43000

I recently purchased one of these and have used it on the Bosch 1617EVS router. Nice addition to the tool kit.

Cassandra
 
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