Router Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I want to create small discs of various sizes. Absolutely round,3/4" thich, smooth edges for gluing. I remember seeing a v-block jig for rounding a rough cut discs, but unable to relocate details re jig use. Pros and cons are welcome. I want to gather more info before using this method.

Assistance is always appreciated.
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
18,808 Posts
Firstly Will, welcome to the forum.

When you say "small discs of various sizes", what sizes are you talking about.

You could use a template or circle jig to cut the discs. They would not be "rough cut" and would need little smoothing.

How do you intend to glue them? On edge? side by side?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the welcome. I want to make a serving board with different widths of differnet woods. When this is glued together, I then want to route a circle through the wood board. At this time I want to use a Disc near the thickness of the board, cut it in half, taper the edges and then use as a "plug" to fill the hole from both siges of the board. This will give the appearance of the "plug" being a solid piece of wood.

the tapered egdes will allow a very snug fit into the hole.

Does this make sense?? The hole in the board and the corrresponding "plug" could be of different sizes relating to the visual aspects of the entire board.

Will

Assistance is alwasy appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Apart from wanting to cut right through the board, it sounds like you want to achieve an inlay effect. For my money, I would settle of going the inlay route, working from each side but cutting and inlaying a maximum of 1/8in deep.

To do this you need a home made template for the patterns you want, and an inlay kit. The kit included a small bit (typically 1/8in) a template guide, and a spacer that fixes onto the template guide. Many suppliers produce the kits and most have web videos on using them.

In use you cut the recess and the inlay piece using the same template, and adding or removing the spacer to the template guide ensures that the inlay and recess match, unless you have sharp corners, where the recess will have a corner radius equal to the bit radius. In that instance you can trim the corners of the recess, or round the corners of the inlay to match. Here is a link to a video explaining the method.

If you make the master template reversible, you should be able to get a very close match for the inlays so it looks as though the go right through the board. Hope this helps you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
The inlay technique provides more options for varying the pattern. One could have cherry on one side and say, walnut on the other. Would be a neat appearance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
My New Circle Jig V 2.0

Okay, probably the best way to show you how this circle jig works is through a real life example. My mission was to cut an access hole in a portable table top so that I could attach my new router table top and fence.

Here are the steps, you can follow along with the enclosed photos:
1) Locate the general site of your target access hole;
2) Measure the radius of the desired hole using a compass;
3) Attach the router to the circle jig;
4) Use the compass to profile the distance between the pivot stud (on the circle jig) and the outside diameter of the router bit;
5) Tighten the "T" bolt on the circle jig to secure the adjustment bar that secures distance between the pivot stud and router bit;
6) Verify the location of the desired access hole in relation to the new router table top;
7) Use the compass to superimpose the desired access hole dimension on the target table top;
8) Drill a pilot hole on the table top to accept the pivot stud on the circle jig;
9) Insert the pivot stud in the pilot hole with the router in operation;
10) Rotate the circle jig counterclockwise with the router in operation; and
11) Continue the counterclockwise rotation until the cut is complete.

Viola'... the new access hole allows the router, new router table and fence to fit exactly as intended.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
This is what I am seeking. The wood I need to rout is 1" thick. If the template is ,say, 1/2" thick and the the subject wood, that would require a router bit capable of cutting 1-1/2". Haven't seen a samll bit that will cut that deep. any suggestions??

Will
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
This is what I am seeking. The wood I need to rout is 1" thick. If the template is ,say, 1/2" thick and the the subject wood, that would require a router bit capable of cutting 1-1/2". Haven't seen a samll bit that will cut that deep. any suggestions??

Will
Do these discs need to be face grain?? Otherwise just pick up some dowel stock and slice off the thicknesses you need.
You could reduce the template thickness, that would give you an extra 1/4".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
You are correct, however I wanted to make the disc/plug from paduk, yellowheart or other contrasting wood. Go to outofcontrol-woodturning.com to see what I want to accomplish. Turner Bob uses 5/8" thick stock for the plugs, while I will need 7/8"-1" thick stock. The extra thickness puts a strain on a router bit to cut that deep unless I am willing to waste a lot of material. Thanks
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top