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I want to round edges of 3/16" thick baltic birch. This would mean finding a 3/32" radius roundover bit. This will also need a super small bearing OR a thicker pieces to guide it with cut to fit. A guide piece to use over and over is not a problem. But I still need the crazy-small radius.

This is for results that have far too many edges to do by hand (100s of inches per finished product).

Is there any way to devise a table router that could work here? Might require a jig, there might be such a product out there (though I've tried to search), or it might just be impossible.

Chamfering both sides and then milling off the sharp end could work but that's three operations instead of two and wouldn't feel right.
 

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I have a couple of 1/8" round-overs - never had a use for anything smaller.
will this be free-hand with a bearing bit or on a router table with a fence ?
posting drawings, sketches or photos of your project would go a long way for the most accurate responses.

oh, and Welcome to the Forum !!
 

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I have a Dremel with a pretty small round over bit. Not sure of it's size but it's tiny. It doesn't have a bearing but with a straight edge and a jig to maintain balance and depth it might work.

Another alternative is a an edge plane with a custom blade. I think there have been posts on the Forum about that a while ago. You can search the archives.
 

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A bit without a bearing begs for a table and fence. It will make the project go much faster. That small roundover will go in one pass. I'd want the smallest possible insert opening to see if it will help you avoid tearout or splintering. Interesting question. I also like the multilayered edge of BB ply.
 

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Pretty sure you won't have enough material left for the second side to guide a bearing. I think that you would have to guide the baseplate of the router for hand routing or use a table. Either way you wouldn't need a bearing bit although it could have one. I wonder if you have an ogee bit where part of its profile will have that radius. Me (being a cheap guy) would look through my bits first and test it on a scrap.
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I'm a mechanical engineer, turned woodworker, machine design and automation, specifically. If this is something you'd like to discuss for a production environment, I'd be happy give my opinion. And if you need something designed and built we can talk about that after we nail down your actual requirement. The router bit isn't a big deal, Kowood makes very small metric radius, really nice carbide bits. Check them out on Amazon, you won't be disappointed. The other thing is, it is not over the top expensive to have a custom radius bit made, or several (definitely cheaper by the dozen in the machine tool world). Bearings are available in any size you want, and custom grinding is available. A huge part of woodworking is figuring stuff out, most of the time fixing a 'F' up! But its much like when I was an engineer, you put the pieces together to create. Any thing you want to do, you can! You just need to learn how. I'll be happy to answer any questions.....
 

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Pretty sure you won't have enough material left for the second side to guide a bearing. I think that you would have to guide the baseplate of the router for hand routing or use a table. Either way you wouldn't need a bearing bit although it could have one. I wonder if you have an ogee bit where part of its profile will have that radius. Me (being a cheap guy) would look through my bits first and test it on a scrap.
View attachment 400499
Why do you need the bearing at all....zero clearance router fence, or as close as yoj can notch that major diameter, let the fence deal with it. You can keep the bearing on the bit, notch in the fence needs to be taller. But won't effect the results
 

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I dunno, the amount of material you would be removing is pretty small. I'd be tempted to devise a sanding jig that holds a piece of sandpaper in a 3/16" cove. Adhesive backed paper is available so the size of the cove might have to be a little larger. a couple of quick sanding passes will take down the edge. Might actually be faster than setting up and routing.
 

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I used a couple of different tiny bits and found it was too much work fussing around to get a decent roundover. I have better luck with using a sander to round over a tiny edge. I like the 'triangle' sanding attachment for my Dremel oscillating tool for this.
 

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I use 3/4" MDF (CNC cut) as the pattern for some of my work with 8mm Baltic Birch. I pin nail the Birch to the MDF, cut it to shape with a spiral carbide bit and bearing, and then use a 5/16" round over bit to finish the edge. So long as I don't try to make too many copies the MDF holds up well. I'm sure the same technique would work for 3/16" material. Use an 1/8" round over bit and it should work fine.
 

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I have a Dremel with a pretty small round over bit. Not sure of it's size but it's tiny. It doesn't have a bearing but with a straight edge and a jig to maintain balance and depth it might work.

Another alternative is a an edge plane with a custom blade. I think there have been posts on the Forum about that a while ago. You can search the archives.
You may want to check with a Luthier builders supply company for just such a plane. I vaguely remember a guitar maker using one on YouTube.
 

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Why do you need the bearing at all....zero clearance router fence, or as close as yoj can notch that major diameter, let the fence deal with it. You can keep the bearing on the bit, notch in the fence needs to be taller. But won't effect the results
I built a router table for my large 3/16" arbor Dremel Trio router. And have used 1/8 RO bits. But the company no longer supports this tool.
The new standard 1/8" arbor Dremel tool can be used on their own router table. I have seen 1/8" RO bits on the web.
 

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I want to round edges of 3/16" thick baltic birch. This would mean finding a 3/32" radius roundover bit. This will also need a super small bearing OR a thicker pieces to guide it with cut to fit. A guide piece to use over and over is not a problem. But I still need the crazy-small radius.

This is for results that have far too many edges to do by hand (100s of inches per finished product).

Is there any way to devise a table router that could work here? Might require a jig, there might be such a product out there (though I've tried to search), or it might just be impossible.

Chamfering both sides and then milling off the sharp end could work but that's three operations instead of two and wouldn't feel right.
I've used 1/16" round over bits and had no trouble. You might try starting with this even though it would leave a 1/16" inch flat.
 
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