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David - Machinist in wood
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Welcome to the forum! Add your first name to your profile to clear the N/a in the side panel and so we'll know what to call you. Add your location to your profile, as well.

We do like photos so show us your shop, tools, projects, etc. whenever you're ready. What sort of woodworking are you planning or doing with the Colt and Triton router table?

David
 

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Welcome to the Forum...you will get a lot out of this place...LOTS of helpful and knowledgeable members with much experience.

Great choice on the Triton for the table...more than enough power to sling even the biggest bits. Don't forget to take out the springs...

The Colt is also a great handheld router...just be careful with feed speed and depth...

There are many variations of router tables if you do a "search" in the TOOLS tab...

Good luck and be safe in the shop...
 

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Hello fellow router users. I am quite new to woodwork, have been doing leatherwork for 40 years, always wanted to do woodwork, have been making some jigs etc. I have a Colt and a triton router, want to build a router table for the triton.
Hello N/A and welcome to the forums...
We're happy you found us...

About that inquisitiveness of yours... We are all over that, we can help, we really can, w/ have some ''light reading'' for you...
We've gathered together is a bunch of pertinent/relative information on routering in this here link ... You should find everything (at least most) quite useful, a lot of help and get you off to a running start in the world of routers... Enjoy...

Do take some time and read the safety PDF's... PLEASE!!!
Blood and trips to the ER, we find, are very annoying... Not to mention – expensive...

We do welcome all questions on about any subject you can come up w/ too....
Not only that, we excel at spending your money...

Now about that table...
we have some more browsing for ya...
ROUTER TABLES
there's more here at this link on RT's than you'll be able to digest at one sit down (or many)... Ohhhhhh, so many ways and choices...

And while we're at it, let's not forget this vital function you won't be able to do w/o......
DUST COLLECTION
There is some, okay, a lot of information, because one size does not fit all when it comes to dust collection and your health in this here link... Beyond a doubt, a given even, you will need it... Besides, who likes to wallow in a mess???...
 
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John
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Hello and welcome to the router forum Snipe
 

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G'day, and welcome to the forum.
 

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Welcome aboard. Be sure to add your 1st name and more importantly your location as it does make a difference in answering some questions about tools and such as your needs will vary by location (voltage for example).
 

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Mike
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Welcome to the Router Forums. It might be interesting to incorporate some leatherwork into a few woodworking projects like leather inserts on accent table tops, decorative tooled leather inlay panels for box tops, leather hang rings on an entry hall mirror, and what ever other projects you can think of designing.
 

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Welcome. I have both a colt and a Triton (and a couple of 1617s) If you plan to build your own table, do use Baltic Birch plywood. Make sure it isn't warped. If it's been stacked vertically as many precut pieces are in woodworking stores, it may be warped and won't do. I like a double layer. A table is sooo much safer as well. Leveling a plate is another important step, you don't want a lip of the router mounting plate to stick up above the table level, or too far below or you work piece will catch on it and mess up your routing job. Kreg makes the leveling device in the picture.

You can just use an extremely straight piece of lumber for a fence to start with, but if you get fancy (and you probably will) make one with a high vertical face. It will allow you to do the ends of longer pieces. You could make a jig for that, but there are easier ways. I learned a LOT about routing from watching the youtube videos by Marc Sommerfeld. He is selling his own jigs and bits, but he was a cabinet maker in his prior life and his methods are really easy to use. He removes safety devices in the videos so you can see what he's doing, but leave yours in place!

Stick's materials are equal to the best books on routing out there, so do read them over, in particular note the direction of grain aspects. Orienting the wrong way will lead to tearout and poor results.

Since you're fairly new to this, I've attached a pdf of the 18 plus things that accelerated my learning curve. I'd done DIY and carpentry projects all my life, but woodworking is several steps up in complexity because you're making complex projects with close tolerances. It discusses many things and is fairly long, but has lots of pictures and illustrations.

If you make a two layered table top, you can use 3/4 on the bottom layer, half inch on top. Then cut out the opening for the plate you select in the top layer and use the Kreg levelers to bring the plat up for an exact fit. Much easier than it sounds. Cut the basic openings just inside the outline of the plate, then use your Colt with a mortising bit to cut to just a hair larger than the outline. A mortising bit has a bearing the same size as the cutters, so you can lay a straight piece of wood, clamped in place at the cut line, and the bearing will follow that piece. With the Colt, don't take off any thing more than 1/8th inch at a time. The bit will overheat and become unusable.

The third picture is a way to lay out straight edges to use as guides to the mortising bit for an exact fit. You want just a hair wider opening than the plate or it will be difficult to remove. Insert playing cards all round, then clamp in place.

Hope all this is helpful. Like the others, I can see a nice marriage of leather and wood. And I wonder is some of the great leather tools might also allow you to create some gorgeous designs and textures in wood.
 

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Welcome to the Router Forums. It might be interesting to incorporate some leatherwork into a few woodworking projects like leather inserts on accent table tops, decorative tooled leather inlay panels for box tops, leather hang rings on an entry hall mirror, and what ever other projects you can think of designing.
That is a heck of a good idea, leather goes great with wood. I bet you could create some dang fancy pieces doing that.
Herb
 
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