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I am a Crafter who wants to expand her skill set
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I recently have expanded into using a router with my projects and when I went to visit my parents, my dad gave me 2 routers that my grandmother had left me when she died. However with me living across the country I could only take with me what I could carry.
Now I didn’t need anything extravagant so I took the smaller one of the two, which was a Craftsman All in one cutting system, which I thought was pretty cool.
Anyways, I am now home and I created a router table for it, but when I went to attach it, I ran into an issue.
the base plate for the router attachment doesn’t have any mounting holes like a normal router.
Does anyone have an idea or hack that could help me with mounting it?
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welcome to the forum !!
for me, I would drill some holes through the base plate and corresponding countersunk holes in the table top for a few 1/4-20 machine screws and lock nuts. do you think that's possible ? can we see photos of where you are going to mount it ?
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Welcome to the forum.

I agree with John.
 
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Welcome aboard. I don't see a model number on that unit and wonder if it isn't more like a Dremel type unit. What size is the collect or better yet what is the model number. My concern is if it indeed can use router bits and is capable of safe cuts. There are a variety of routers out there and the two most common are the smaller trim routers typically used to "trim" edges with shallower cuts and then the full size router that will use 1/4-1/2" bits typically, at least US made ones. What they can do safely is dependent on their size.

While I don't disagree that it could be mounted I would really want to know what you would use it for and it's size to see if it is capable/safe. Just saying. Do you have a model number available?
 

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All you need is a router plate which you can get from Amazon or Ebay. The plate will have countersunk holes in it so all you need to do is to drill holes in your router plate and bolt the two together.
 

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I agree with Steve (sreilly). To me, it looks like a zip saw or roto tool which is probably most commonly used for cutouts in drywall etc. You will likely be limited in what bits you can use and the materials you can cut. It could be useful in a table for craft-like projects or save the table for when you make another trip to the folks and get the bigger one. If you do a image search for DIY dremel table you may get some ideas. Or screw it on like John said and you'd be able to use the adjustments built into its base.
 

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I agree with Steve and TenGees; Actually it looks a lot like a Craftsman rotary tool I had. My tool had a plunge type "router" base also. As I recall it was limited to bits with a pretty small shaft diameter. I would first look at what size bits you're going to be limited to and then look at how deep of a cut you can make once this is mounted in the table. For example, if you have a three-quarter inch thick table and you screw this base to the table, the usable part of a bit might get pretty short. However, if you mount this tool to an acrylic or aluminum base, and that base mounts in a three-quarter inch thick top, You will have less thickness to go through before your bit starts working. I would check on Amazon and eBay and see what size bits you can get for a craftsman rotary tool which is what I believe they called this. You may find that this tool will only work with 1/8 inch and 3/32 inch bits. Once you determine how big a bit you can use, you can determine whether this tool is going to be big enough for your projects.

I have a Bosch trim router and I would consider the craftsman Rotary tool that I have to be something other than a trim router, at least compared to the Bosch Colt. The Bosch will take quarter-inch bits and the tool has a much more powerful motor. I would see what size bits this tool can take first, then see if it's got the power and depth to do what you want.
 

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Welcome to the forum.
 

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Your router is a small hand held one that should work very well free hand and likely uses 1/8" shank bits like Dremel. I would not use it mounted in a router table. Most routers mounted in a table are at least 2HP to 3HP units.
 

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welcome to the forum !!
for me, I would drill some holes through the base plate and corresponding countersunk holes in the table top for a few 1/4-20 machine screws and lock nuts. do you think that's possible ? can we see photos of where you are going to mount it ?
View attachment 399426
Welcome aboard. I don't see a model number on that unit and wonder if it isn't more like a Dremel type unit. What size is the collect or better yet what is the model number. My concern is if it indeed can use router bits and is capable of safe cuts. There are a variety of routers out there and the two most common are the smaller trim routers typically used to "trim" edges with shallower cuts and then the full size router that will use 1/4-1/2" bits typically, at least US made ones. What they can do safely is dependent on their size.

While I don't disagree that it could be mounted I would really want to know what you would use it for and it's size to see if it is capable/safe. Just saying. Do you have a model number available?
Out of curiosity what routers are made in the US? I'd trade my two for one good US made one.
I agree with Steve (sreilly). To me, it looks like a zip saw or roto tool which is probably most commonly used for cutouts in drywall etc. You will likely be limited in what bits you can use and the materials you can cut. It could be useful in a table for craft-like projects or save the table for when you make another trip to the folks and get the bigger one. If you do a image search for DIY dremel table you may get some ideas. Or screw it on like John said and you'd be able to use the adjustments built into its base.
I built a table for my out of date Dremel mini router and I love it for intricate work.
That's what I did with my mini. It was a lot easier than it sounds.
 

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I am a Crafter who wants to expand her skill set
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
welcome to the forum !!
for me, I would drill some holes through the base plate and corresponding countersunk holes in the table top for a few 1/4-20 machine screws and lock nuts. do you think that's possible ? can we see photos of where you are going to mount it ?
View attachment 399426
thanks for the advise, however I just bit the bullet and bought a new router. Now all I need to do is find a router table plate that works with my new one. That is my newest issue, finding one. The new router is on its way, but I need to find a template of where the holes are on it. (Skil 14 amp fixed and plunge router combo)

thanks for commenting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That's what I did with my mini. It was a lot easier than it sounds.
thanks for the advise, however I just bit the bullet and bought a new router. Now all I need to do is find a router table plate that works with my new one. That is my newest issue, finding one. The new router is on its way, but I need to find a template of where the holes are on it. (Skil 14 amp fixed and plunge router combo)

thanks for commenting!
 

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I am a Crafter who wants to expand her skill set
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Welcome aboard. I don't see a model number on that unit and wonder if it isn't more like a Dremel type unit. What size is the collect or better yet what is the model number. My concern is if it indeed can use router bits and is capable of safe cuts. There are a variety of routers out there and the two most common are the smaller trim routers typically used to "trim" edges with shallower cuts and then the full size router that will use 1/4-1/2" bits typically, at least US made ones. What they can do safely is dependent on their size.

While I don't disagree that it could be mounted I would really want to know what you would use it for and it's size to see if it is capable/safe. Just saying. Do you have a model number available?
it was just the craftsman all-in-one cutting system.

I ended up biting the bullet and bought a better one though. Thanks for the help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
All you need is a router plate which you can get from Amazon or Ebay. The plate will have countersunk holes in it so all you need to do is to drill holes in your router plate and bolt the two together.
I ended up biting the Bullet and bought a 14 amp Skil fixed and plunge router combo, but I can’t figure out which plate (preferable pre drilled holes) will work with it (it is still on its way to me)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I agree with Steve and TenGees; Actually it looks a lot like a Craftsman rotary tool I had. My tool had a plunge type "router" base also. As I recall it was limited to bits with a pretty small shaft diameter. I would first look at what size bits you're going to be limited to and then look at how deep of a cut you can make once this is mounted in the table. For example, if you have a three-quarter inch thick table and you screw this base to the table, the usable part of a bit might get pretty short. However, if you mount this tool to an acrylic or aluminum base, and that base mounts in a three-quarter inch thick top, You will have less thickness to go through before your bit starts working. I would check on Amazon and eBay and see what size bits you can get for a craftsman rotary tool which is what I believe they called this. You may find that this tool will only work with 1/8 inch and 3/32 inch bits. Once you determine how big a bit you can use, you can determine whether this tool is going to be big enough for your projects.

I have a Bosch trim router and I would consider the craftsman Rotary tool that I have to be something other than a trim router, at least compared to the Bosch Colt. The Bosch will take quarter-inch bits and the tool has a much more powerful motor. I would see what size bits this tool can take first, then see if it's got the power and depth to do what you want.
The craftsman all-in-one cutting tool that I have actually works with 1/4” bits so the bit wasn’t the issue. It was just the fact of mounting it.

I did however bite the bullet and bought a new Skil 14 amp plunge and fixed base router combo so I can have it mounted better.
I can then keep my craftsman one for freehand needs.

I just need to figure out how to mount my new one (finding the right mounting plate is the problem now)
 

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It might help to call Skil or one of the vendors of the various plates such as Rockler, Woodcraft, Wood Smith, Acme tools, Grizzly, Kreg, MLCS, etc to see if any of their plates are predrilled for your individual router. Or go to Amazon and do a search under "router plates for Skil routers". You may also want to get a blank 12 x 12 sheet of acrylic and use the plastic base that comes with the router as a template for drilling holes to mount your Skil router. If you use acrylic, you may want to get a sheet that is at least 3/8 inch – or even half-inch thick so it doesn't bow under the weight of the router.
 

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Mounting a router without predrilled holes is really not a difficult task. This is just one approach.
Put one of the round inserts in the plate that has a hole that matches the diameter of a straight cutting router bit you have. This will likely be ¼,” but you could use any other size straight cutting bit that just fits in the hole of the plate you are trying to mount to.
Place the plate UPSIDE DOWN on your workbench with a couple of blocks underneath it to raise it above the benchtop.

With a ¼” bit mounted in the router place the router on plate so the bit extends through the snug hole. (Obviously, it must extend no more that the height of blocks raising the plate from the benchtop.)

Rotate the router the way you will want it to be once it is in the table, For example access to the plunge mechanism and where the on/off switch and the speed dial (if any) is located for easy access.

Mark where the holes need to be drilled by touching the plate through the router base’s pretapped holes with a scribe, awl or pencil. Drill the plate using a slightly oversized drill bit. (Say about 1/32” oversized.) This will give you some wiggle room because it is likely not to have the holes perfectly centered for the router.

Turn the plate over and countersink the holes you drilled so your flat head mounting screws will be flush or slightly lower that the plate surface.

Place the router on your bench with the bit pointing up and slide the plate right on top of the router and insert the mounting screws.

You are done.

There are other techniques that work just a well one using your home printer to print the bottom of your router. Another would involve using bushings that mount to the router’s bottom that act as edge guides.
 
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