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Last year, I bought a used wood-lathe. Here is the stand, I built for it. I already had some bords and two parts of an old sliding door. For the frame my choice was laminated spruce (4 x 6 cm and 4 x 8 cm), which I got for an acceptable price. I learned a lot for and by doing this project . Knowing the dimensions of the laminated wood, I started with sketchup (really helpful for me), made my very first handmade mortices, first tenons and also first halflap joints, which I glued and screwed. I am never 100% satisfied with the results of my work, really never, but this stand came out square, rocksolid, and heavy which was all I wanted. If it's not heavy enough, I have the option to place boxes with sand on the lower bord. The xxl-casters had a good price and guarantee mobility in my small shop. Bonus for me is the possibility to use the lathe outside. So over all, I am relatively pleased and look forward to build of a new-fangled-workbench.

I posted the same on lumberjocks and I hope, this is no crossposting in this case!
 

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It looks like a very solid build and I hope that you get many years of happy turning. There is no problem posting on both forums (owned by the same company) I have many threads posted on lumberjocks as well as on this forum, also occasional ones on yet other forums.
 

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Hello Harry,

thanks a lot for your kind words! Until know, I didn't even start turning. But I will try soon.

Best regards

Uwe
 

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The sand bags may be a good idea Uwe. A book I read on turning stated that the heavier the better in a lathe. The author stated that old cast iron lathes were among the best because of the ability of cast to absorb vibration. He also knew of one turner who mounted his lathe to a large block of concrete.
 

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Hello Harry,

thanks a lot for your kind words! Until know, I didn't even start turning. But I will try soon.

Best regards

Uwe[/QUOTEI
I was a forum member for some time before certain members persuaded me to get a wood lathe (I'm now on my second one) and I was guided by members from turning pens, then vases and bowls, even Tulips. I must mention here that turner extraordinaire, Bernie, gave me a great deal of help. I'm still very much the amateur but improving all the time. These shots show a few of the many items that I've made, all have photo-shoots in my uploads. Turning wood can be very relaxing.
 

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Hello Charles,

thanks a lot for the tips. I didn't try yet and I don't know if I am right, but I would expect something like sand to absorb vibrations better than a massive thing. I think of the friction betwween the small stones. But if I am wron, I also could use heavy stepstones ore something else.

Oh Harry,

if I see the results of your woodturning, I could only think of an amateur if I would also believe that water runs uphill and the earth is a plate. Very beautiful!

Best regards to both of you

Uwe
 
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