Router Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, it's been a long time since I visited these forums, hope you are all doing OK with your projects and work!.

Now back to my little issue, happens that I have to fix a wooden counter-top that has some damage I think mostly due to water over time, even though I could guess how to make some quick fixes I would need some help to make some temporary repairs, as in, I need to remove the discoloration.

Since I'm not living in my native country anymore, I don't have access to my usual tools, so anything even a bit complicated probably wont happen anytime soon :p.

Thanks for the help, here are some pictures portraying the damage:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
hey Paul...
glad to see ya stopped in... been wondering about ya buddy...

let's see if Keith Mealy can help ya out...
the PDF has pictures....

Every once in a while you’ll get a white spot on a finished surface. This is caused by moisture penetrating the finish and making it cloudy. As a finish ages, it gets more susceptible to such damage. Heat exacerbates the problem, whether it is from a tea cup or carry-out pizza box.
There are lots of approaches to fixing this and it can depend on the finish, the age of the damage, and the extent of the damage. Not all of them work all the time. Removal of white water rings brings the kooks out of the woods, each with their own secret method (just check Pinterest). Here are a few approaches that people suggest (and my opinions on them).

Oil the surface
Apply some mayonnaise or Vaseline and let it sit overnight. I can’t say that I’ve ever tried this because it is not always successful and as a professional, I can’t just smear some Hellman’s on their table, take a bit of a candy bar, and tell them to clean it in the morning. I need a positive result before I leave. Other people suggest vinegar and olive oil rubbed in. (I’ll save that for my French fries at the fair)

Heat
I am not so sure about this one.* You have to hit just the right heat level or you can do some severe damage. You can try to heat the area with a hair dryer.* A hair dryer might be fine, but a heat gun can easily blister a finish.** I also read an article once on dribbling on some denatured alcohol and setting it on fire.** Did trial on this once, blistered the finish.* And you might set your shop* or dining room on fire.
Another approach some suggest is putting down a cloth and ironing. Hmm. Heat can melt and finish and then you end up with a cloth impression and fibers locked in your finish. So pass on this one, IMHO.

Reamalgamate
Lacquer (often found on factory finished furniture) and shellac are best choices for this. Since re-introducing their solvent(s) melts the finish then it re-cures. I have used these successfully.
Touch up places sell aerosol cans “blush eliminator,” “no blush,” and “blush remover.” These are simply a slow drying lacquer thinner. It melts the finish and allows the moisture to escape while it re-cures. IF you don’t have the aerosol, you can spray some lacquer retarder (thinner) on the surface.

Another approach is to pad with a rag dampened in denatured alcohol. Just damp, not dripping. This is quite effective on shellac and will also work on aged lacquer.

Here is a vintage piece that I repaired after it sat in a leaking moving van under a mover's, blanket.* I wiped with a cloth dampened in DNA.* I also cleaned up a bit with padding lacquer. before and after

There is also a touch-up product called “Padding Lacquer”* this is normally shellac that has lacquer thinner (that contains alcohol) as its solvent.* Pad this on and it works similarly to the alcohol only approach and adds some more finish.
Howard’s Restor-a-Finish contains some alcohol and acetone and is in this category. Briwax’s solvent is toluene, and it works similarly.
Oily Abrasion
This is my go-to method usually. There are several manufacturers of treated cloths (usually called “White Ring Remover Cloth”) that you rub on the spot and it goes away. The cloths have a very fine abrasive and oil (sometimes tallow acid). Guardsman makes one usually sold in Bed Bath & Beyond and sometimes Lowe’s. There is a larger version that is made by Homak and Jasco (identical product, different color packaging). I’ve found these at various big boxes, but not consistently. Now I order a dozen or so at a time online. [These cloths can also be used as general purpose polishing cloths. They work well on brass, some people even use them to polish their trumpets]

If you don’t have these, some say you can use a light abrasive like rottenstone or cigarette ashes and some rubbing oil, toothpaste, or fine steel wool and oil.
Clean up the oil with Dawn and water or an emulsion furniture polish.
Abrasion may change the sheen, glossier for the stain removal cloths, and flatter for steel wool. You can apply more finish or simply rub the whole surface if you don’t mind. I’ll just spritz with the right sheen touch up lacquer on lacquered furniture.
Special Case: Oil Finishes
Oil finishes can get white spots because moisture penetrates the oil finish and raises the grain. Oils finishes have virtually no water excluding factor. The solution here is to lightly sand and reapply the finish. You can even wet-sand in the oil with a wet-or-dry sandpaper.

Here's another approach that I tried unsuccessfully to show when I did the TGIF. Just showed up on my feed.

He uses hand sanitizer (gelled alcohol) on 4 layers of shop towels, lay on top and let the fumes do the work. One minute at a time. So it's another approach on the "reamalgamate" method.
https://www.popularwoodworking.com/...-white-rings-haze-from-finishes-and-furniture



....
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Hi guys, it's been a long time since I visited these forums, hope you are all doing OK with your projects and work!.

so tell us how ya been, how Sweden has been treating ya and what'ja been up to...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey Stick, I've been living in Denmark (not Sweden :p, but close enough!) for a while now, a bit over a year and a half, things are great, I work at a software development company, I'm about to move from my current apartment and have to find a new one in less than 2 months, proving to be challenging so far.

That's the reason why I need to try to repair those stains, unfortunately it's an old building, like most buildings here, and they use wood everywhere, and unless you are extremely clean, which I'm not, you are going to damage some things over time...

So I have to make it look as good as possible before tomorrow morning :).

Nice thing about here is that you can travel almost everywhere in Europe for little money, which is very nice.

I will try some of those solutions to see where I get, I could fix some of those, but there is a warping in some of the counter-top that I wont be able to fix anytime soon though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,583 Posts
Nice thing about here is that you can travel almost everywhere in Europe for little money, which is very nice.
Good luck on solving the finish problem. You can travel on little money since Europe is so small. Hard to do here in the USA- like going from Cleveland, Ohio to Miami, Florida. I had a friend who traveled with three other guys on their military ID and saw every country in the free world at that time in the mid 60s. This was on their 30 days military leave.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,438 Posts
I remember round the world tour offer,, the only condition was that you could only travel in one direction, further East or West, no doubling back. It was cheap and an open ticket. Very tempting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So an specialist came to my apartment and noticed that there was some damage more profound than discoloration, not sure if the correct term is warping, but looked like some parts had like "waves" or something.

That probably is a bit over my woodworking skill level I think :/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
Pablo; hope this isn't coming out of your Damage deposit! Yikes!!

I've always recommended against wood in Kitchens and bathrooms. It doesn't do well around water/moisture.
A commercial kitchen is stainless steel and tile for a reason. (I kind of like the look in fact)

Hope this works out for you.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top