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I bought a TEAC A-4010 in 1970 when I was in Vietnam. Bought through the PacEx catalog and had it shipped home. Used it a lot over the years including to record my first daughter's first few words. Three years ago, when I was anticipating a move, I checked it out and found out that some of the parts had deteriorated over the years. I was able to purchase them online and refurbish the tape deck. I hooked it up to the receiver I was using at the time and played a lot of the tapes that I had, mostly music, and had a nostalgic walk down memory lane. I finally sold the machine to the guy who I had purchased the parts from. I had forgotten how heavy it was until I brought it up from the basement. Times have changed. Now you can record and play music on devices that will fit in your pocket and still leave room for keys. No, the sound is not quite the same but, then again, neither is my hearing. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Here in Australia most servicemen returning from Vietnam brought back an Akai M7. Teac was a BIG seller here and for a few years I was a Teac service agent which included the Tascam range of eight track semi-pro recorders.
 

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I don't recall ever seeing prerecorded reel to reel tapes but I guess I may have always been in the vinyl section of the store. Cassette tapes became popular especially for cars. I had a Pioneer CT-F850 dual-capstain three-head which was a decent recorder from the same era as the reel to reel in the video (had the same meters). I mostly made tapes for the car and some live recordings of jams at the house. I took a one-year full-time course in audio. One aspect of my college course was studio recording, where I got to use an Ampex one inch, eight-track, floor standing reel to reel on a 24 to 8 channel mixer. The speeds on that deck were 7 1/2, 15, 30 in/s. I got an A in my recording project!

Thanks for the memories, Harry.

The store I bought many records at...
 

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Interesting video Harry, I learned a lot . A friend had one back in the day , was much better quality than cassette tapes
 

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Anyone remember the 8 track cartridge tapes? I had a reel to reel tape recorder. Bought it in the mid 60s to record our high school dance b and. Probably gone to dust, if I still have it. Thanks, Harry.
 

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Anyone remember the 8 track cartridge tapes? I had a reel to reel tape recorder. Bought it in the mid 60s to record our high school dance b and. Probably gone to dust, if I still have it. Thanks, Harry.
I had a stereo from Simpson sears in the 70’s that had an 8 track.
And my 78 TransAm had the factory 8 track player in it ,and was still functional
 

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Discussion Starter #9
In the early 60's I was given a nicely made piece of equipment which was obviously intended for a car. I did some research and found that it was an eight track cartridge player designed for sales reps who travelled long distances so that they could learn all about new products. Came the mid sixties and Toyota cars came fitted with these players. Followed by many brands of domestic players. The sound on music was woeful due to the large amount of wow and flutter due to the fact that the pressure roller was incorporated within the cartridge whereas in both compact cassettes and reel to reel the pressure roller is part of the machine and is far more precision.
In 1965 I had the job of loading blank tape of specified length into empty cartridges for a religious organisation which made copies from reel to reel master tapes from America.
These pictures should bring back memories to many members.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?...arch&qs=ds&form=QBILPG&first=1&cw=1410&ch=670
 
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