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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm Just about to mount my router 1/2" old Makita.


Question One

is it preferred to remove the return base springs from the router.

Question Two

The Router I have has no speed control so I would like to install a speed controller and was think along the lines of this one
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07PRMC3H1/ref=sspa_dk_detail_6?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B07PRMC3H1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEyR1FVM0gzQlhOODNRJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwOTM4NDI1MkFEMDg5VldYOTIzMyZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwMzU1NzkwMko4Q0E1Q0kyNE84VyZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2RldGFpbCZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=

But it only supports RPM of 1400 with my router the RPM is 23000 so the model is unusable can any one recommend a controller with out breaking the bank account.


Question Three

is it best to change the router bit with router in table or remove it and then change the bit ??

James
 

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The springs are to push the router up when hand held plunging. Upside down gravity takes care of that so it works better without the springs.

I think it's MCLS that sells some, but maybe Rockler and Grizzley do as well. They would be geared for using with a router if it came from them. I've heard that they can't be used with soft start but if you have no speed control then you probably don't have that either.

I much prefer to take the router and plate out when changing bits. It greatly simplified when the router is laying on it's side and you can adjust it easier to get access to the collet nut and either get the second wrench in or hold the column lock in place. As nlong as your plate fits snugly in the recess on the top you don't need to screw it down. Gravity works for that too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Charles big big thank you for your reply. Do you have a Link for MCLS speed controller please.

I under stand the logic behind your answer to question three but I would feel safer screwing it down if only in two places plus it would stop the plate moving when I use my scissor lift to alter the bit height.

James
 

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James, I have three routers, with the plates screwed down (but with grub screws for leveling - needs a bit of give and take between the grub screws and the retaining screws when leveling). It is not that big a deal to change bits in the table - two of my routers have a shaft lock, the other needs two wrenches.
Especially with your router lift, remove the insert ring, raise the router so you can get to the collet, and you are good to go. Worst case, you might need one of those goose-necked collet wrenches. You will be re-setting the bit height anyway, unless you are using matched bits (like Desert Rat Tom recommends).
I bow to the greater experience of almost everybody here on the forum over my own, but I had a 3 1/4 hp router with a panel-raising bit strike a hard hidden knot, and dislodge the plate from the table-top, bending a substantial aluminium angle fence in the process. Since then, I have screwed the plates down.
The only real downside is if you decide to enclose the router for dust-catching purposes - there has been much debate on the merits thereof in the Forum. I am still a fence-sitter (pun unintentional).
 

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RogerPowys

I had a look on google for UK-sources of router speed control units and drew a blank. The so-called fan rheostats are just variable resistors - which is not what you want for a router - and almost all were 120V and 1.5kW max. If you were contemplating spending GBP25 on the [totally unsuitable Amazon motor control unit that you included a link to], then a pre-owned variable speed router may be a better proposition [preferably one that accepts 1/2" shank cutters]? I paid £50 [USD65 at the time] for a beautiful used ELU router that is a real thoroughbred. I have hardly used its speed control though, as I don't yet have any panel-raising aspirations. Like others on this forum, I have tended to collect a few routers according to need, rather than to expect one router to do it all.

The jury seems to be out on whether scissor lifts are a better alternative to a conventional crank, especially those you can adjust from above via the router plate.

I am about to find out whether totally enclosing the router to facilitate dust extraction causes the router to overheat, modifications to my table are work-in-progress as I write.

Oh, and yes, take the springs out when suspended in a table - and for the sake of completeness, I screw the plate down, for safety's sake.
Roger
 

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I've had my makita RP 1800 in a table for 4 years now. Never had nor needed nor wanted a speed control. I use all manner of bits perfectly safely.
I have just added a musclechuck to make bit changing faster, although to be honest, it was more that I wanted a new toy than anything else.
I have taken the springs out.
The plate is screwed down to the top, I have had a couple of "incidents" with knots that i'm sure would have lifted the table.
My router is enclosed with under table AND fence extraction.
I built a dirt cheap router lift from scrap wood and old bolts at a cost of about $2.00. its adjustable to finer measurements than a vernier gauge can measure.
Its not pretty, but I dont enter it in beauty contests, I use it to shape wood.
 

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https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/sho...eed_control.html?zoom_highlight=speed+control

Those who have had their plate move must not have had the fence over the plate at the time. I prefer using the fence even when I am using bearing guided bits. As a consequence I've never used a starting pin as the fence makes that unnecessary. I find I have better control starting a cut using the fence plus I can see if I'm getting the full profile cut or need another pass for cleanup. It's impossible for the plate to lift with the fence over it so I guess that explains my experience with not needing to screw my plate down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for replying to my post
Harry you are correct Makita 3612 it's not so much a speed controller that's needed more of a soft start that's required.

It has one hell of a kick when it starts I've used it a lot for kitchen worktops.

The router has had it's springs removed now and support shafts oiled. I also have a question about the air vents being exposed to saw dust now as it's inverted is this going to be a problem I will have a Vac connected to the fence.


this is the speed controller I'm now looking at https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/220V-4000W-SCR-Variable-Voltage-Controller-For-Fan-Speed-Motor-Control-Dimmer-UK/163332121910?hash=item26075a6536&_trkparms=ispr%3D1&enc=AQAEAAADQKvsXIZtBqdkfsZsMtzFbFsbX3WcW5fmB%2Fx7ZbaZTyexXwm9bUJfxmyeAOUbFxiejLkwEMWvUo8lFA%2B5Fu%2BlQpuQDov2NuOBfMOivfeBimU19paZbxsWwG%2BI8gZoN6rJRiOPH3xV4dRi3ssVBunGmZiTwFA%2FRcKuZWy3vFB96las8xx%2FVcFKqmiivvA2qkguNatzVIz3KhB5BzwprhxHS43JGqG6DuyhVHazn%2FkSGMHMMxKyZKhuCLXqkMq4C8WLuHeLBCcGpYhtA%2BE5Arn4h4t1OSE%2FYwk1O4u0YvxmukQHbC%2BHa9L3lS1KRxEIFGspjDkI%2BSwqpcUEa0vFhJr%2FaEQ%2BeMg7T7p65qPGtd47HE7yPW7C%2FQKHQargyuQKJaFJeC3cjeNB5O3tK9tnWJm%2BFvyqODcY05ERFV%2FrrqDc8AvAQgqkphw%2FUF8PzMGJoN7wTfYJmZcqln3l3r2Pk7%2Bub4TNDHzGbj62kiNbwhnwmPaOc3QL2IFRYQHke9t9oNExzGpaQ7vEbyX9n3zEn65LINccQHABvDC9yLAb8p4oWt3cX8RmxHnUiXbVyWjuJ3PUfqOUrR3BlccZnPIRVuCg1yWF7klRxX0rSyEFSYZ7LbJp%2Bbso4lBmB72ke%2FH%2FdKo1w8IOj6OUMGMoeJ01HIQCGkD1eeP%2Fwphl2pkd8FjqXMX3Nf3WCGJr4GVC6GNu%2BilqhMPPpOhx8tIiEqG%2FHmKZtwJMBVqKMWtc8e%2B%2FfB40ct81FraEGtpY4qP%2FHbTuDNj72U8FhJumKIpDsgNVzNK61L9ClU83hEZIDluQFJr%2FA2apTmp2H0LuNQ96S4%2BQMDHtjQF%2B%2FBd0EgaUCWmpSgBSWKaok1zLfF4Af2OKboj%2FH1VsJNf4XpKcdLuJWkcWfd%2B9aG69joqv6Yg1sUruFqLADZREjp8w3ILVHVxRQ2Foim6LXyiO6FdIjiIl1lbRN%2BllDcuczz3kAIx%2FI%2BrlBSpz1jK7qt4B9Xel00sHJOQgrlucZhEZfRtChRUXusvm6EdqIfE4ZAB6Ums%2BeOSHMMkVvKThNswSqyftdduDs0psYhW4hkuMjVy%2FKduN28wiJrelzB2bmONRldWtInl2tQx4irM%3D&checksum=163332121910f558638a738f4551aee6d32d4499cdc4
 

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The router pulls air from its top end so it will be flowing upward around the bit. Having DC air flow at the fence will improve the router's flow since it will create a low pressure air zone there which means less resistance for the flow going through the router to push against as it exits the casing.
 
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Those who have had their plate move must not have had the fence over the plate at the time. I prefer using the fence even when I am using bearing guided bits. As a consequence I've never used a starting pin as the fence makes that unnecessary. I find I have better control starting a cut using the fence plus I can see if I'm getting the full profile cut or need another pass for cleanup. It's impossible for the plate to lift with the fence over it so I guess that explains my experience with not needing to screw my plate down.
I've never had my plate move. It is a very nice fit (homemade, as is the table), don't have a fence at all, and do not screw the plate down. I've never used a starting pin, just start slowly. This has worked for me since around 1996.

Oh yeah, don't have speed control on any of my routers, and no issues at all, just start slow. Don't have any type of lift either, and don't want one. I figure I can pop my plate out, do whatever, and pop it back in with probably less time than a lift, and certainly less hassle.
 
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Thank you all for replying to my post
Harry you are correct Makita 3612 it's not so much a speed controller that's needed more of a soft start that's required.

It has one hell of a kick when it starts I've used it a lot for kitchen worktops.

The router has had it's springs removed now and support shafts oiled. I also have a question about the air vents being exposed to saw dust now as it's inverted is this going to be a problem I will have a Vac connected to the fence.


this is the speed controller I'm now looking at. That controller looks fine but it doesn't have a socket to plug the router into like the one that I showed. My router table which I bought second hand about 18 years ago had a 3600 Makita in it, which is similar to the 3612 and there were no problems, but as you said, when freehand they kick like a mule. I replaced it with the 3612C which is soft start and variable speed.
 

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Well covered subject. Not much to add. I have a box under the router that I now keep open for air flow. Started with a Bosch 1617, but Harry converted me to a Triton TRA001, which has a built in lift. Spring removed. Soft start, variable speed. Plenty of HP for any material. Here, the cost of the Triton is far less than a lift alone. Some old tools are great, but technologyt genrally improves over time. I also use the fence over the plate and don't lock it down. One thing I like about the Woodpecker plate is the twist lock (bayonet) inserts. No more lost screws. I think you can get something similar in other brands, but don't know which.
 

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https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/sho...eed_control.html?zoom_highlight=speed+control

Those who have had their plate move must not have had the fence over the plate at the time. I prefer using the fence even when I am using bearing guided bits. As a consequence I've never used a starting pin as the fence makes that unnecessary. I find I have better control starting a cut using the fence plus I can see if I'm getting the full profile cut or need another pass for cleanup. It's impossible for the plate to lift with the fence over it so I guess that explains my experience with not needing to screw my plate down.
Charles, I assure you that I did have the fence over the plate at the time - I was working on the edge of a long board. Can’t remember which bit I was using, could have been a large mitre-lock bit. I also thought it would have been impossible for the plate to lift up, but as I said, it did lift and in so doing, bent the substantial aluminium right-angle (2” by 2”) profile which was the back of the fence.
Another time when I had a partial lift (the plate did not come right out, and only flexed the profile), was when I was using a Jacobs Powerlift chuck. That time, I was using a 1/4” shaft bit with the Jacobs adapter sleeve. Again, it struck some knot - the bit and adapter came out of the chuck, the bit went flying, the sleeve was damaged, and the plate was partially out of place - and it is a snug fit.
After that experience, I suddenly no longer found it a bind to reach under the table to hold in the shaft-lock to change bits.
What happened to the Powerlift, anyway? Have never seen it mentioned on this site.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It horrifies me to read that so many people find it ok to run a router in there table's with out fixing it down.

would the same people drive around in their cars with the engine just sitting on there engine mounts??. I like my fingers,eye and arms in fact Im quite happy to have all my bits where god placed them. for just for bolts and to bend down and replace a cutter in the router is a small cost to pay for keep all my bits safe.

I have fitted my plate a "trend" BUT I may change it as their is too many rounded edges on it for my liking "yes" it's moulded and not machined so the under side has a small radius where the thickness changes.



anyway there will be no router mounted Frisbees flying around my garage lol
 

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It horrifies me to read that so many people find it ok to run a router in there table's with out fixing it down.

would the same people drive around in their cars with the engine just sitting on there engine mounts??. I like my fingers,eye and arms in fact Im quite happy to have all my bits where god placed them. for just for bolts and to bend down and replace a cutter in the router is a small cost to pay for keep all my bits safe.

I have fitted my plate a "trend" BUT I may change it as their is too many rounded edges on it for my liking "yes" it's moulded and not machined so the under side has a small radius where the thickness changes.



anyway there will be no router mounted Frisbees flying around my garage lol
I don’t think there’s a recorded incident of a router overcoming gravity and floating out of the table top , but I’ve been wrong before.

Could be a safety concern on the ISS though
 

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It horrifies me to read that so many people find it ok to run a router in there table's with out fixing it down.
Been doing it that way since I made my first table, around 1996/7, with no issues. You would hate my saw, when I bought it I took the blade guard and splitter off. I'm 78, and no accidents with any saw. The key is, be a bit scared of your tools, be cautious, and pay attention to what you are doing. One thing I see a lot of is people sawing, and standing in line with the blade. Any kick back would fly right into him/her. I always stand out of line with the saw, even tho I have never had a kickback.
 
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