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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to do some circle cutting in 40mm oak and had planned to use a spiral upcut bit with a 50mm(2") cut length and 1/4" shank. In this video
, the speaker says he is using a 2" bit but then in the early comments says that he had to use a 1" bit, assumably with a long shank, and adjust the router depth a bit more. Of course bits with this much cutting length are not so accessible and 1" bits are easy to come by in the £20-30 range.

I can see that a 1/4 bit 2" cuts less wood and so works/heats less and 2" seems more appropriate for the application. I never considered that a 1" long shank bit would work here and the video maker doesn't say much about what he encountered when doing it this way.

What do I need to consider or plan to surmount if using a longer 1" bit instead?
 

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G'day @brucew268 , and welcome to the forum.

What is the diameter of the cutter?
A 2" cut on a 1/4" shank would be stretching its limits, I feel...
Are you able to use a 1/2" shank cutter?
 

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PS.. I had previously watched and liked that video.
A handy way to make circles for lazy susans, etc..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
G'day @brucew268 , and welcome to the forum.

What is the diameter of the cutter?
A 2" cut on a 1/4" shank would be stretching its limits, I feel...
Are you able to use a 1/2" shank cutter?
Thank you, I haven't touched a router in years, so been doing lots of re-acquainting myself with routing.

The cutter is also 1/4". I thought that 2" was likely a bit long on a 1/4" since hardly anyone had them. Yes, I can find some 1/2" x 2" CL that aren't eye-wateringly dear, so maybe need to go that route. They all have cutter and shaft both 1/2". I wonder if heat will be a problem with a 1/2" cutter in oak doing all the stock removal (as I don't have a bandsaw).

I'm still curious about the use of a 1" CL for a 1.6" thick application, would have thought it not possible or maybe some burning long the shank?
 

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Thank you, I haven't touched a router in years, so been doing lots of re-acquainting myself with routing.

The cutter is also 1/4". I thought that 2" was likely a bit long on a 1/4" since hardly anyone had them. Yes, I can find some 1/2" x 2" CL that aren't eye-wateringly dear, so maybe need to go that route. They all have cutter and shaft both 1/2". I wonder if heat will be a problem with a 1/2" cutter in oak doing all the stock removal (as I don't have a bandsaw).

I'm still curious about the use of a 1" CL for a 1.6" thick application, would have thought it not possible or maybe some burning long the shank?
Use your 1/4" shank bit to cut a circle template on 1/4" thick material.smaller than juice groove.on your router table.
Safer to use a 1/2 shank router with a template Guide (AKA guide bush) and straight bit to cut in portable mode. With a smaller Guide bush can cut the juice grove first and changing to a bigger guide bush cut then cut edge.

1/2" shank bit with 2" cutting edge that came with my router FREE is useful with guide bushes. But you can buy patterm bits that comes with a bearing.

Liquid Audio equipment Automotive lighting Technology Cable


(When the material is big and heavy, take the tool to the material)
 

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Welcome. I would use a half inch shank. But I'd rough cut the circle on a jig saw, keeping 1/8th or so outside the marked circle. I would also make a circle jig exactly the correct size with perfected and smooth edges (mdf). I'd tape this down with several strips of double stick tape, then use the trim bit with top mounted bearing, to clean up and smooth the edges of your final cut. I personally would hesitate to cut the circle on a 2 inch block with a router. You can do it making multiple, multiple passes using a plunge router to increase the depth of cut a little at a time. But to do that properly will require placing centering hole in the block, or attaching a small block with center hole with tape so you can use a circle cutter.

Much easier to make a perfect circle jig, trim with a bandsaw, then use a trim bit (1/2 inch shank) to perfect the circle and produce the final edge. Put effort into the jig to reduce risks to the final block.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Turns out my max Overall Length in my plunge router is 96mm without bottoming out in the collet. Most are 100-102mm OL, so that rather limits my options for a direct plunge cut without a template 3x the cost of a straight bit with bearing and template.
 

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Hi Bruce, when using any other base plate, you should remove the existing base plate, IMO....
 
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