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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings from Finland.
Now that I have a super nice shop filled with allmost all the tools I need and customers whom pay the fun I lacka (almost) only one thing and thats the correct or best or most cleaver plasement If the stationary tools. I remember I saw a good article in Fine woodworking but cant Find it after many years. Also I've tryed to search thru internet without any luck.
Shure I had luck on something. I find outoa that you have some kind If system where your tools are in the shop. Can you point the direction were I could start my search from? Curently Im working with 22 outer frames from 1920--30'S. I need at least also two tables on the shop and some extras in the paintshop but thats a different story :)
 

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To me the most important thing is placing the table saw in such a way that you will have equal room in front and behind and plenty of room on the left side. This is necessary in order to rip wide long boards. If you have a drill press that can be put by any post since the post area is wasted space and a drill press doesn't need space behind it. A router table needs space to run long boards through but not space behind it, so that can be placed along a wall along with a miter saw and jointer. It's always nice to have tools on movable bases for flexibility. If you have a ceiling mounted air handler then put it near the dustiest tool, usually the table saw. Also have plenty of light especially above the tools.
 

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My shop is pretty small so I put every tool on wheels. I use a tool and roll it out of the way and roll out the next one I want to use. Just something to think about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the ideas. For the moment I have the bandsaw and tablesaws cheek to cheek and behinde them the planer and shoowac. Along the walls I have the mitre saw and the lathe and two big tables. The space is about 6x6m.
 

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Hello Esko,
I see you are doing fine. If you Google wood shop layout it will give you some drawings and photos of various size shops and that will give you some ideas. Have fun
Dan
 

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The Tablesaw is a space hog because it needs so much space around it. I raised mine 3 1/2 inches so the saw table is higher than my jointer and planer. The jointer sits right against the left wing of the tablesaw and the planer to the left of the jointer with room to walk between the jointer and planer. On those occasions when I need to rip a sheet of plywood, the overhanging wood passes over the top of the jointer and planer.
 

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I would say that your tables are very important Tiny but they can easily get in the way of your tools so perhaps put locking wheels on them so that you can move them out of the way if they interfere with using a particular machine. That would also allow you to move them close to a machine that is being used and would save you steps walking back and forth.
 
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I have misplaced the article you are talking about as well. The main theme was rollers and placing the large machines in the centre back to back as much as possible. I have a small basement hobby shop. Here are a few pictures. It is a work in progress. The 52" table saw is in the middle. The post is a real pain but I am working around it. The jointer and surface planer exit onto the table saw table. I had to elevate both of them so this would work. Drill press, scroll saws, and router tables can be put against the outside walls. I want to build a cut off saw stand along one of the walls as well. The work bench on the left of the table saw gets in the way sometimes. I have to pull it out when I have something larger to cross cut from the left side. If the workbench was just a hair shorter it would be a nice support for the table saw on the left.
 

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I figure you do different work on them in different locations in your shop. If that is so, then if you can set it up so you can go from workstation, to work station, one after another. That way you won't be carrying your work back and forth. Sort of like an assembly line. That's all I could come up with.
 

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I have misplaced the article you are talking about as well. The main theme was rollers and placing the large machines in the centre back to back as much as possible. I have a small basement hobby shop. Here are a few pictures. It is a work in progress. The 52" table saw is in the middle. The post is a real pain but I am working around it. The jointer and surface planer exit onto the table saw table. I had to elevate both of them so this would work. Drill press, scroll saws, and router tables can be put against the outside walls. I want to build a cut off saw stand along one of the walls as well. The work bench on the left of the table saw gets in the way sometimes. I have to pull it out when I have something larger to cross cut from the left side. If the workbench was just a hair shorter it would be a nice support for the table saw on the left.
Jamie you have a very nice work and it is laid out really good. I also like the way you keep it clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks guys for the good hints and advises. I've scrolled the net and I have seen a lot of good looking shops. I've laughed for my self for some of the titles. On some of the pictures is a typing like "small woodshop setup ideas" and the shop is something like your normal 1-1,5 car garage... Not very small in my eyes if it is 4-5x6m ;-)
 
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