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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Stereo stand build recommendations

Guys and gals , I need to make a new stand that’s low profile and wide ,that will be sitting below my flat screen tv.
I want my stereo components to sit inside ,and my centre channel speaker to sit on top .

I really like the robust minimalist look of this one I found in this pic,but I’m concerned about the top warping ,as my centre channel speaker is 69 pounds .
My version will be 2’ deep and 65” wide , and not as tall . I am going to wall mount my flat screen ,so it will not be resting on top of the stand, just the speaker .

Does this stand look like it is made from solid wood , and any suggestions how to pull this off?
If it is solid, I’m assuming you glue several sections together.
I want to stain it black if that changes anything .
If I was to purchase pine at Windsor Plywood , this project would probably cost a few thousand dollars . We have a mill near by ,but I’m not sure what they have available. A friend was there once and bought Fir, but after reading about Fir ,they don’t recommend it for staining .
I’m almost wondering if a guy would have to add a piece of angle iron inside the wood some how , as the long width looks prone to warping ?
I didn’t want to add center supports ,but it may come to it .

So I guess I’m wondering what type of wood would be cost effective and strong enough not to warp
 

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Guys and gals , I need to make a new stand that’s low profile and wide ,that will be sitting below my flat screen tv.
I want my stereo components to sit inside ,and my centre channel speaker to sit on top .

I really like the robust minimalist look of this one I found in this pic,but I’m concerned about the top warping ,as my centre channel speaker is 69 pounds .
My version will be 2’ deep and 65” wide , and not as tall . I am going to wall mount my flat screen ,so it will not be resting on top of the stand, just the speaker .

Does this stand look like it is made from solid wood , and any suggestions how to pull this off?
If it is solid, I’m assuming you glue several sections together.
I want to stain it black if that changes anything .
If I was to purchase pine at Windsor Plywood , this project would probably cost a few thousand dollars . We have a mill near by ,but I’m not sure what they have available. A friend was there once and bought Fir, but after reading about Fir ,they don’t recommend it for staining .
I’m almost wondering if a guy would have to add a piece of angle iron inside the wood some how , as the long width looks prone to warping ?
I didn’t want to add center supports ,but it may come to it .

So I guess I’m wondering what type of wood would be cost effective and strong enough not to warp
KD Doug Fir,or Hemlock 2X12's should work for the top and cut them full length to sit on the ends should support your speaker. If you rip the center to make a square edge then glue them together, it will give you 22" wide. You can add a 2" filler strip between them to get a full 24" wide.
Then dado in the shelf on each end. (2) 2X12X 8' L (1) 2X4 X 8' L =Top +Ends
(1) 2X12X 12' L (1) 2X4X 8' L = Shelf

Put some castors on it to move it around.

Herb
 

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Theo
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Just gong by that picture, I would say cut a pallet up, and stack two pieces, one atop the other, and you'd have what you want.
 
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Rick, not sure where you are getting your prices, but unless you are building that out of wenge. or some other exotic you are no where near a couple of grand. Personally if I were building that, and painting, I would use poplar. It take paint very well. To calculate the sag, use the sagulator, found here: https://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/ to determine your load needs. I would be very comfortable using 8/4 poplar for that project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Rick, not sure where you are getting your prices, but unless you are building that out of wenge. or some other exotic you are no where near a couple of grand. Personally if I were building that, and painting, I would use poplar. It take paint very well. To calculate the sag, use the sagulator, found here: https://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/ to determine your load needs. I would be very comfortable using 8/4 poplar for that project.
Sorry Bob, I wanted to stain it so I can see the grain . I could cheat and put two supports in the front and back if I have to .
I swear from the pic that it’s warping ,but could be the angle etc
 

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Bob; Poplar is mostly available as finished mouldings and KD finish lumber up here in BC, not saying somebody like Reimer Hardwood doesn't have it but where Rick is (Cranbrook) the selection is somewhat limited.
Herb's assessment of what's available is pretty much the same here in BC.
Western Maple or Alder would be too more fairly economical alternatives.
https://www.westwindhardwood.com/product/hardwoods/maple-western/
https://www.westwindhardwood.com/product/hardwoods/alder/

Should be less than $400 (32 Bdft +/- @ $10/bdft)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
KD Doug Fir,or Hemlock 2X12's should work for the top and cut them full length to sit on the ends should support your speaker. If you rip the center to make a square edge then glue them together, it will give you 22" wide. You can add a 2" filler strip between them to get a full 24" wide.
Then dado in the shelf on each end. (2) 2X12X 8' L (1) 2X4 X 8' L =Top +Ends
(1) 2X12X 12' L (1) 2X4X 8' L = Shelf

Put some castors on it to move it around.

Herb
Liking the 2x12 idea . The mill I can go to is about a 30 minute drive. I know they sell fir that needs to be planed , and I did buy a 15” planer , but have never hooked it up .

I thought about castors also . Wish they had some type that you can embed so that there not as noticeable
 

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...I thought about castors also . Wish they had some type that you can embed so that there not as noticeable
How about something like this ball castor with a socket. Drill a vertical hole and insert the socket, then push in the castor. No locking, but this is pretty low slung. If you don't have legs, add a hardwood block to the corners. You can get this kind of castor in a variety of colors to match your cabinet hardware.
 

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I did buy a 15” planer , but have never hooked it up .
Do hook it up. They are loads of fun, noisy, and make lots of shavings. I used to get my little shop knee deep in shavings at times. Love my planer.
 
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With the weight of the components in the center of the shelves and add the heat load from the components and I would think that it would start sagging in the middle.
 
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Quite recently my darling wife decided that she wanted to replace our entertainment unit. Because my furniture making days are over I bought her one made in Indonesia from solid Mahogany. It is well made, the top and shelves have cross bars to prevent warping and most importantly, my beloved really likes it. Here are before and after shots.
 

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If you use two 2 X 12s, you could use a spline between them - maybe even an epoxied metal spline if you are really concerned about sagging under a heavy load. A spline would be a good idea on a 65" span. I've never used it, but for a black finish, would a dye work better than a stain? Don't know; just thinkin'.
 

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Sorry Bob, I wanted to stain it so I can see the grain . I could cheat and put two supports in the front and back if I have to .
I swear from the pic that it’s warping ,but could be the angle etc

You were talking about using Pine, but it is too expense and unavailable you say, Poplar would probably be my first choice of cheapest hardwoods too. Although I made some chair seats out of Hemlock that stained up good one time. I picked through the pile of 2X8s at the big box store and found some 8' ones that were knot free, and straight grained. I couldn't find any 8/4 poplar, it would have cost a lot more too. Cottonwood might be cheaper. :surprise::grin:
Not sure how well 2nd growth fir takes stain, it has a lot of resin in it, but if you go to the mill , be sure your lumber is kiln-dried, you might have warping problems in the future. just some things to think about.

Just from experience,I would say that a 24"wide 6/4 board X 62" span will support 69# with no problem without center support. Cherryville Chuck ought to be able to be able to figure that out, I have long ago lost my tables of timber framing stresses.


Herb
 

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As Herb points out, finding 12" planks of hardwood will be more luck than choice. Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't quarter sawing the first choice of sawyers doing hardwood?
That tends to limit the width of planks, unless they're coming off of a very large tree.
Quartersawing, Rift Sawing, and Plain Sawing Explained
I love D. Fir but as Herb points out the pitch pockets are a major p.i.t.a.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the responses all . I think I’m overly optimistic on the no warping and no bracing sections inbetween .
As mentioned, I have a feeling the boards from this mill are not going to be dried properly .

For finished look ,I really like the pine shelving after it’s stained. It’s only 16” deep, so I’d have to buy extra sections and cut and glue them on to make it 24” deep . Well less than 24” as I’d be adding a border ,as the side wouldn’t look very good .
But I would have to rethink the look.

Also I’m thinking of using plywood and gluing it to the bottom of the pine shelving for thickness and strength .

Wish I was better at welding ,because steel would be a better option in this circumstance, but my welds look like crap lol .

Btw, nice job on the stand Harry
 

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Hi Rick,I was gonna suggest what Steve @ ScottyDBQ said about splines But I was a bit late. Also,does your timberyard or sawmill guarantee their wood is properly dried?
 

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Thanks for the responses all . I think I’m overly optimistic on the no warping and no bracing sections inbetween .
As mentioned, I have a feeling the boards from this mill are not going to be dried properly .

For finished look ,I really like the pine shelving after it’s stained. It’s only 16” deep, so I’d have to buy extra sections and cut and glue them on to make it 24” deep . Well less than 24” as I’d be adding a border ,as the side wouldn’t look very good .
But I would have to rethink the look.

Also I’m thinking of using plywood and gluing it to the bottom of the pine shelving for thickness and strength .

Wish I was better at welding ,because steel would be a better option in this circumstance, but my welds look like crap lol .

Btw, nice job on the stand Harry
If you are going to double up 2 layers of 3/4", then for the edge band front and back you can use a 1X2, that will add strength from sagging.
BTW are you leaving it open all the way through? Or are you putting a back on it? A back will help support the middle too if you are worried about it.

You might do some testing by getting a 6' 2X12 and standing on it flat when it is blocked up off the floor and you will get an idea of how strong they are. we used to use them for scaffold planks, and on an 8' span just one wide would support a 250 lb. person easily, and you are talking 69 lbs. on 2 of them side by side glued together on a 5' span.

Just saying ,

Herb
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If you are going to double up 2 layers of 3/4", then for the edge band front and back you can use a 1X2, that will add strength from sagging.
BTW are you leaving it open all the way through? Or are you putting a back on it? A back will help support the middle too if you are worried about it.

You might do some testing by getting a 6' 2X12 and standing on it flat when it is blocked up off the floor and you will get an idea of how strong they are. we used to use them for scaffold planks, and on an 8' span just one wide would support a 250 lb. person easily, and you are talking 69 lbs. on 2 of them side by side glued together on a 5' span.

Just saying ,

Herb
That’s a great point with the 2x12 Herb , as there strong as all heck . I’m almost thinking about glueing that pine shelving to the 2x12 , as that would create a nice thick look I’m after and be 2-1/4” thick .
My main concern would be the 2x12 warping from all the tightbond glue . Maybe if it was well clamped for a day?
I guess I could put the kibosh on glue and just air nail the pine shelving to the 2x12 , but it would be stronger if they were glued together and acted as a composite I would think.


I could install a back , but I was actually going to use this metal mesh stuff to hide the back wall .
Nothing says I can’t have a few supports though
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Does it matter if the top's thicker, Rick?
Just rip a bunch of 2x4 or 2x6 to the thickness you want...2"?...and glue up a 'benchtop'...16 lengths I think(?).
Do it in two 12" panels, run it through the planer, then glue them together for your 24" top
That’s no a bad idea either Dan
 
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