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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody now how to remove hot melt glue painlessly?

My adjustable router thicknesser is working well, but I have to glue the small pieces to the board as they are too thin for clamps.
I can use a scraper to get them off the board afterwards, but then its a pain having to pick dozens of bits off the finished piece.
 

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Doug
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Bob,

A heat gun might soften it up, but still a lot of scraping.

You could put glue on the edge of the board, and then cut or joint of sand it off?

Or you could get rid of the glue all together and use a cam or wedge system to hold the wood in place. I brad nail down blocks of wood for clamps, but the wedge system reduces the risk of hitting a steel nail with the cutter.

http://www.routerforums.com/general-routing/17248-two-cam-board-issues.html#post140704

>>>>>I can't remember who's wedge setup this is<<<<<<
 

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Experiment by placing news print over the area and ironing it.

Try this first in an inconspicuous area or on a piece of scrap.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Doug, wedges wont work. I'm cutting boards down to 5mm thick (about 5/16ths") Also the router sled has to move over the entire workpiece.
I'm laying the pieces flat, and gluing the edges of the pieces to the base board for routing. It works really well. But when I remove the piece, its only 5mm thick, but all the edges have glue on them.
Its a nuisance picking it all off with my fingernails, rather than a serious issue, I just wondered if anybody had found an easy way.

Phillip, the edges are just too thin for ironing. Dont want to use any heat as that will spread the glue to the flat surfaces.
 

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Have you considered dabs of glue on the face of the part? - then you would have to just pry the part off the base once you've finished routing.

As far as the wedge clamps, the straight pieces next to the wood that you're planning could be a little thinner than the finished parts and the wedges could be thicker, unless the concern is that the part lifts up while you're routing. Or, would it be too much hassle to clamp one side, rout half way, stop and move the clamps and then finish the second half?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Have you considered dabs of glue on the face of the part? - then you would have to just pry the part off the base once you've finished routing.

As far as the wedge clamps, the straight pieces next to the wood that you're planning could be a little thinner than the finished parts and the wedges could be thicker, unless the concern is that the part lifts up while you're routing. Or, would it be too much hassle to clamp one side, rout half way, stop and move the clamps and then finish the second half?
no good, the piece is laid flat to the table. Glue underneath would make the surface uneven.

The router will lift a piece and chew it up it isnt glued almost all the way around the edges.
 

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no good, the piece is laid flat to the table. Glue underneath would make the surface uneven.

The router will lift a piece and chew it up it isnt glued almost all the way around the edges.
I went back and looked at the photos in your original posting after I answered, and can see the glue around the parts now - and that you really pack the pieces in there to maximize production. I wonder if there's a way to come up with some kind of spring-loaded device hanging under the sled to keep downward pressure on the parts while you're routing?
 

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What about using a shop vac to hold it down? You would have to have some holes with nothing over them so some air goes through to keep from overheating the vac. Gluing some 80 grit sandpaper to the table would help keep from sliding sideways then the vacuum would only have to hold it down.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Tom, that amount of pieces at one time wouldnt be usual. I just wanted to test the idea thoroughly. And one of them lifted into the router bit because it was only glued on 3 sides.

It absolutely has to be glued at least twice on each side, or the piece gets chewed up. Spring loading would have the opposite effect of lifting the pieces

The vacuum table is going a little overboard here I think. Nice theory, but the cost of materials and time involved way out strips the uses this sled will be put to.

The sled itself is at the final prototype level. The only improvement worth making is an easier adjustment of the legs. having to reach underneath at each corner, and then keep checking the table isnt tilted is time consuming. Not that I'm desperate for time, this is only a retirement hobby for me. Its just that I'm lazy and always looking for a machine to do the work for me.

So far, the simple scraper idea seems worth pursuing tomorrow.
 

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Anybody now how to remove hot melt glue painlessly?

My adjustable router thicknesser is working well, but I have to glue the small pieces to the board as they are too thin for clamps.
I can use a scraper to get them off the board afterwards, but then its a pain having to pick dozens of bits off the finished piece.
use solvent based contact cement...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
making and fitting wedges would take more time than picking off the glue, let alone the wastage on the wood.

As I say, its not a huge problem, just takes me a couple of minutes or so using fingernails to get all the glue off the edges before sanding. In all other respects, the hot glue is very quick and effective.
 

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Sticky

Would it help to try using two sided carpet tape! I mostly use carpet tape to hold all sorts of wood pieces together when routing. To assure a good grip with the carpet tape, I use a clamp or vise grip to first put some pressure on the tape. After removing that squeeze the tape holds the pieces together very securely. I have had little or no problem removing the double sided tape afterwards. Residue, if any, is easily removed with solvent or thinners. Hope this is a helpful hint.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I've seen lots of people use it, but I dont have much success with double sided tape. I think its the heat here. In the long summer and with the doors closed on the workshop temps regularly go above 50c inside. Even outside air temps go above 40c on some days. The tape seems to lose its stickiness while on the shop's shelf.
 

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Have you tried using a chisel to par the glue away?
 
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