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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is that the product that you install styrofoam sheets and then trowel on a layer some kind of material,then spray on the thick rubbized top coat?
Herb
it can be, when they did my house they put a skim coat on of a concrete base because I had already had a concrete base but I had changed all the windows and of course none were original size. then they applied the stucco entirely by trowel. here are some before and after.
 

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it can be, when they did my house they put a skim coat on of a concrete base because I had already had a concrete base but I had changed all the windows and of course none were original size. then they applied the stucco entirely by trowel. here are some before and after.
That is the regular old cement stucco. The new "Stucco" on commercial building they put 3 1/2" styrofoam on and the trowel on a subbase then spray on a finish coat.

HErb
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
That is the regular old cement stucco. The new "Stucco" on commercial building they put 3 1/2" styrofoam on and the trowel on a subbase then spray on a finish coat.

HErb
this is premixed colour based fine float acrylic stucco and not cementitious stucco which is the old style. it can be applied both ways either spray or by float.
 

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I've never heard of the rubberized stucco. I tried finding it on some of our websites and I came up empty so far. I have a job it would be perfect for.
 

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Chuck it is just acrylic stucco or EIFS. It was invented in Germany after the war as a quick alternative to regular stucco. Dryvit was the first iteration of it I think. It was first used in Canada around 1956. I worked on the first building to use it in Victoria in 1974 an 18 story hi-rise in James Bay. It has certain elastomeric properties and usually goes over a styro-foam sub strata but can go over a well floated cement coat.
 

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Chuck it is just acrylic stucco or EIFS. It was invented in Germany after the war as a quick alternative to regular stucco. Dryvit was the first iteration of it I think. It was first used in Canada around 1956. I worked on the first building to use it in Victoria in 1974 an 18 story hi-rise in James Bay. It has certain elastomeric properties and usually goes over a styro-foam sub strata but can go over a well floated cement coat.
Can it go directly onto wood Brian? I built part of my house on top of a PWF foundation. I've been trying to think of what I can use to finish the small section between the ground and the bottom of the siding. I was thinking regular stucco but I think the elastomeric would be better.
 
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Can it go directly onto wood Brian? I built part of my house on top of a PWF foundation. I've been trying to think of what I can use to finish the small section between the ground and the bottom of the siding. I was thinking regular stucco but I think the elastomeric would be better.
Yes it can Chuck in a sort of round about way. It is really made for the foam board base which is not like regular styrofoam. It is cooked somehow so that it does not expand and contract with temperature changes. The foam is stuck on with acrylic base coat using a largely notched trowel and reinforced with heavy fiberglass mesh over which the acrylic base coat is spread (sand and acrylic liquid to which you add portland cement). Spreading it takes practice. It is put on tight and as flat as possible as the finish coat goes on very thin and doesn't hide blemishes.
Having said all that I have used it several times over a wood substrata but only for myself and one friend. The first time I used it was over OSB in an unheated storage room interior. I cut wide strips of fibreglass mesh and basically taped the joints and spotted the screw holes just like dry walling. Then I spread the finish coat over top It has to go on tight, think keeping the trowel at a 30-40 degree angle more or less scraping it on. The finish is like spreading thick paint with sand in it. To bed the mesh I just used tile thin set. That finish lasted over 20 years until I converted the room to another use. The next time I did that it was on a friends garden shed over plywood. Basically used the same procedure and it still looks good 12 years later. Last time I did it was for my new garden shed 3 years ago. This was on OSB again using thin set as a base. This time I completely skimmed the shed with base after the taping. I did this myself keeping my eye on the sun and working fast. The finish skins over very quickly. You must keep a wet edge in order to be able to float it. On a stucco job the gut troweling is just about a foot or two in front of the guy floating.
The first picture shows the front with the base skim, the second with the finish all on. I bust it up with Tudor boards to make it manageable for one guy.
 

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I had my upper story done with stucco in November of 2016. The window surrounds are all high density foam of some sort. The pilasters at the front corners are built up by the installer and are of the same material.
The foam they put underneath is 2 1/2 inches thick. I also had all new eavestrough and downpipes put on. My windows were done a few years earlier. I installed the back and sides but left the front and all four doors to the pros. A couple of the pics show the material used. It has made for a much warmer and very much quieter house. The garage doors were the last job. Houses in the east here are/were primarily brick but over the last few years a lot more stucco is showing up on higher end places as well as commercial buildings. Bricklayers are retiring and the kids don't like the idea of working too hard. Brick is a higher priced item as well.
 

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I could fix it but it gets the idea across either way. Now we know where the 1389 in your user name comes from.
 
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That is the regular old cement stucco. The new "Stucco" on commercial building they put 3 1/2" styrofoam on and the trowel on a subbase then spray on a finish coat.

HErb
Not necessarily, Herb. I think you're referring to EIFs... https://www.homeadvisor.com/r/synthetic-versus-traditional-stucco-siding/
They trowel or spray on Vinyl or Acrylic stucco topcoat over cement scratchcoat here, on residential construction. I've never seen them use styrofoam.
The norm here is to do the Tyvek and rainscreen consruction, then stucco wire and two coats of cement based stucco with coloured Acrylic coating as a finish.
http://pacwestsystems.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Sanded-E-2014.pdf
 

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I forgot to mention that the foam blocks are glued and screwed to the walls then sanded to blend the joints. I think they might have then taped all of the joints. They try to wait for a windless day before sanding to keep the resulting snow from blowing everywhere.
 

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Can it go directly onto wood Brian? I built part of my house on top of a PWF foundation. I've been trying to think of what I can use to finish the small section between the ground and the bottom of the siding. I was thinking regular stucco but I think the elastomeric would be better.
Not a good idea, Charles. it traps moisture and contributes to wood rot. Put a waterproof membrane on first. You could use something like Hardiboard over the membrane as a base if you don't want to go the whole scratch coat route.
 

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Not necessarily, Herb. I think you're referring to EIFs... https://www.homeadvisor.com/r/synthetic-versus-traditional-stucco-siding/
They trowel or spray on Vinyl or Acrylic stucco topcoat over cement scratchcoat here, on residential construction. I've never seen them use styrofoam.
The norm here is to do the Tyvek and rainscreen consruction, then stucco wire and two coats of cement based stucco with coloured Acrylic coating as a finish.
http://pacwestsystems.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Sanded-E-2014.pdf
You are right about EIF, but it is applied to sheets of foam.
https://srmi.biz/energy-saving-tips/insulation-air-sealing/exterior-insulation/

This is what Rick could use without moving any equipment,
@Cherryville Chuck Here are some foundation treatments:
https://duckduckgo.com/?t=ffab&q=Foam+and+stucco+on+foundations&atb=v1-1&ia=web
Just saying,
Herb
 

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You're not wrong,Herb; I'm just saying that here on the Coast (mild Winters) they can apply it directly to a stucco 'Brown' coat ...ie the acrylic or vinyl coating is the third and final coat.
Remember the old "Kenitex" back in the '70s? They sprayed that stuff onto anything and everything. Massive lawsuits ensued; rotted any wood that had moisture trapped. A nightmare for homeowners!

Apparently the problems were Worldwide...
https://incomplaint.com/complaints-reviews/offender/Kenitex/
 
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