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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi gang,

I'd like to create some circle one piece frames, for my partners cross stitching.

I was wondering what you experiences were in doing this task?

I have a few ideas/possibilities in my head. Basically, I created a 3cm wide frame, with a full diameter of around 20 cm (to outer circle). I want to put a simple round edge and rabbet in the inner circle and a nice ogee on the outer rim.

To start, there's cutting the circle. I've already whipped up an MDF template (flush, no bushing space) for the circle, just in case I need it for table top work (I guess that's for you guys to say!!).

I've got a circle cutting jig for my Triton plunge, so should I cut the circle(s) with that? In shallow passes? Or should I jigsaw it out and flush it up on the router table?

Then, what's the best (or probably most stable/safe) way of using the edge bits? Should I hand route it, with or without template, with bearing? Or should I attach the template and use the table top with a starting pin? I'm especially concerned about the inner circle rabbet cut, and how to get a nice smooth feed while keeping my fleshy bits safe ;)

Looking forward to your feedback! Any many thanks in advance :)

Jimbo
 

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Jimbo,

I cannot see if you have mentioned the thickness of the material.

Is it solid lumber, ply or mdf?

I would use the circle cutting jig to cut an inner and outer grove about 1/4" deep. Rough cut with the jigsaw. use a bearing guided straight bit in the table, with starting pin, to clean up the edges and use the required profiles also in the table with starting pin.

3cm wide circle does not give much base for a hand held router to ride on.

Just my 2cents......
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cheers James!

It's solid pine at 19mm on this muckup version, probably some sort of ash or oak on the final version, also probably 3/4" ish as well.

I see your point about there not being a lot of surface area for the base to travel on during freehand! But I am a bit concerned about how I would control the edging on the inner circle on the router table, I get the feeling that any pressure in the wrong place and the whole thing could go spinning around and shooting off in some direction, and my hands could head towards the bit!

This may only be concern in my head, I'm quite new to using the table!

I was thinking, to solve the surface area problem I could cut the inner circle first, leaving me all the additional wood outside the outer circle to use as leverage for inner edging. Then I could double tape the off cut inner circle and the remaining frame down to the table, and use the inner off cut as leverage on the outside edging. (I hope that made sense :D )

Is there a reason you don't use the whole circle with the router, but leave 1/4" and then jigsaw out the rest?

Thanks again James!

Cheers,

Jim
 

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The one problem I foresee is that if the circle frame is one piece, there will be opportunity for the sides to break along the short grain.

It almost makes sense to create a multi sided polygon with long grain straight pieces (mitered with the appropriate angle) and then cut a circle from that.

More work of course but just throwing that out there.

In terms of routing the internal groove, I would use a laminate trimmer with a bearing rabbeting bit. Just make sure the router is always level.
 

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Using a circle cutter and cutting through 3/4" wood will take a few passes but will give you a nice smooth edge however it is also possible to use your jig saw and make a circle cutter for it and do the job quicker. You could then smooth out the edge with a straight trim bit. Hilton is correct about the short grain. It may not split while you are making it but it will be very weak and will most likely break. You could back the whole thing up with some thin plywood glued to it.
 

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I was writing my response when Art said what I was going to say. If you have a biscuit joiner or could borrow one I think I would recommend putting together an octagon first then rough-cutting the circle, etc. Let us know what you do and how it works out.
 

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Is there a reason you don't use the whole circle with the router, but leave 1/4" and then jigsaw out the rest?
I use this method, on occasion, to save wear on the router bit. A trim cut of 2-3mm is easier on the cutter than cutting through at the full diameter of the bit.

I have seen professional wood workers also use this method and teach it in their schools.

This is one of many ways.

I would try the method suggested by "cagenuts" (Hilton) as I have seen this method used to make a round mirror frame.

How to make a Round Picture Frame - YouTube
 

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I use this method, on occasion, to save wear on the router bit. A trim cut of 2-3mm is easier on the cutter than cutting through at the full diameter of the bit.

I have seen professional wood workers also use this method and teach it in their schools.

This is one of many ways.

I would try the method suggested by "cagenuts" (Hilton) as I have seen this method used to make a round mirror frame.

How to make a Round Picture Frame - YouTube
I don't know if this resolves Jimbo's issue or not James, but I got a lot out of the video. Very cool, easy to set up system. Thanks for the link.
 

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I don't know if this resolves Jimbo's issue or not James, but I got a lot out of the video. Very cool, easy to set up system. Thanks for the link.
I get a lot out of these videos if I look at the concept and how it can be applied to other projects.

Some people can only see the project in the video and not realise the other uses.

This is one of those times.

The video addresses the issues of:

1. cutting the outside and inside of the ring using the circle jig (secure with double sided tape).
2. how to support the router during the cut.
3. once the ring is cut, change to the profile bit and still use the circle jig.

These are some of the methods I have picked up from "Bob & Rick" as well as "Template Tom".
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi guys,

To clarify, it's a frame to put the finished stitch in, not an actual cross stitching frame!

I consulted my regular well of knowledge (my Dad) and he suggested something very similar to in the video! With the help of the jig and double sided tape, it was very easy to cut and shape to circles! All without having to drop the machine back in the table, thus eliminating my table worries!

Thanks for all your help :)

-J
 
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