Router Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm making my joinery bench I went to a local yard that stock Redwood, unsorted center free 5ths. 100 x 100mm PAR for the legs, the short and long stretchers are thinner don't pose as much of a problem or should I say..... sweat.

I did visit another branch of the same company and arranged delivery of several meters which I intended to roughly cut to length then accurately cut on sliding mitre saw, or if that was not up to it, then take to joinery company and ask them to cut.

Anyway the timber arrived but was so bowed etc I had to refuse delivery. Even if I had jointed,planed out defects the dimensions would be different. We have an expression in the UK, " Changing the position of the goal posts :) )

So I think the only way forward is to take a hand saw to the yard with my long Veritas precision straight edge to select timber that is straight. The yard are quite happy to allow you to select and cut your own timber. They don't provide a cutting service and for health, safety, legal reasons they don't allow customers to use power tools, ie circular saw.

I'm intending to cut the 100 x 100mm with a hand saw. 4 inch is pretty thick. Sorry if I seem a bit of a wimp :) but going though 4 inch, four times I'm thinking is going to be pretty hard going.

I read about using a hand saw with a more aggressive tooth count, could actually make cross cutting timber even harder. So what type of tooth cut and set would the ideal handsaw have to do this job nice and easy?
Thanks people :)
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,182 Posts
I've never been horribly particular about my hand saws, as long as they were sharp. I would say sharp is the operational word.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Peter I'm not sure if I follow what you mean. Are you only crosscutting or will you be trying to rip them to long lengths? My preference for sawing is usually a Japanese pull saw but traditional ripping saws were push cut and only about 5 teeth per inch. Going with the grain has a bad habit of plugging up the teeth and gullets of the average saw so I think the ripping teeth were sharpened a bit different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
Redwood?! Beautiful stuff but not particularly tough when it comes to abuse. You sure you want to use it for a workbench??
I should talk; all my greenhouse benches are WR Cedar...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
crosscut saw...
 
  • Like
Reactions: MEBCWD

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,480 Posts
FRESHLY SHARPENED Crosscut saw. From the store, no saw I've ever purchased was really sharp. Get a decent brand and take it to have it sharpened. They you'll have a serious saw instead of a dull metal thingy that only grinds and doesn't cut. You'll be surprised how much easier cutting will be with a really sharp saw.

I use redwood here a lot for outdoor stuff and it will NOT hold up to workbench use. Carefully selected pine is OK, but it needs to dry out or be Kiln dried. Another option would be to use a decent plywood top. Put down two layers on the top if you want it to last for any time. Redwood is just too soft to hold up for a workbench, especially if it has any heartwood in it. Don't use redwood for legs either, the bolts or other connectors will soon grind at the holes, loosen up and become wobbly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
I'm making my joinery bench I went to a local yard that stock Redwood, unsorted center free 5ths. 100 x 100mm PAR for the legs, the short and long stretchers are thinner don't pose as much of a problem or should I say..... sweat.

I did visit another branch of the same company and arranged delivery of several meters which I intended to roughly cut to length then accurately cut on sliding mitre saw, or if that was not up to it, then take to joinery company and ask them to cut.

Anyway the timber arrived but was so bowed etc I had to refuse delivery. Even if I had jointed,planed out defects the dimensions would be different. We have an expression in the UK, " Changing the position of the goal posts :) )

So I think the only way forward is to take a hand saw to the yard with my long Veritas precision straight edge to select timber that is straight. The yard are quite happy to allow you to select and cut your own timber. They don't provide a cutting service and for health, safety, legal reasons they don't allow customers to use power tools, ie circular saw.

I'm intending to cut the 100 x 100mm with a hand saw. 4 inch is pretty thick. Sorry if I seem a bit of a wimp :) but going though 4 inch, four times I'm thinking is going to be pretty hard going.

I read about using a hand saw with a more aggressive tooth count, could actually make cross cutting timber even harder. So what type of tooth cut and set would the ideal handsaw have to do this job nice and easy?
Thanks people :)

You might watch this video on handsaws. He also has two videos on sharpening handsaws.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,032 Posts
All good information. I'll have to look at my hand saws with different informed eyes now. So much to learn, so little time.......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
I'm intending to cut the 100 x 100mm with a hand saw. 4 inch is pretty thick. Sorry if I seem a bit of a wimp but going though 4 inch, four times I'm thinking is going to be pretty hard going.

Peter...sorry but my 3-dimension head is having a bit of a problem with your 2-dimension legs...

It would be good to know what cuts you are making...are you having to rip timber to create the 100x100 and then cross cut for length...? Or is the timber already 100x100 and you are cross-cutting only for proper length...?

If you're doing both and you only want to bring one saw, you will need a good saw for ripping...then use the same saw for your cross cuts. I assume you are not making finish cuts at the yard...

...sorry this doesn't yet get to your question regarding tooth count and set...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I really dislike the new Shark teeth saws they sell today.
I would try and find an actual crosscut and a actual ripsaw for your task. Sharp is the key!
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
I really dislike the new Shark teeth saws they sell today.
I would try and find an actual crosscut and a actual ripsaw for your task. Sharp is the key!
Welcome to the forum Boxer. I'm curious what you don't like about the Japanese tooth pullsaws? Once I tried one I all but retired my old Simmons/Nicholson/Disston. It's been so long since I used it last I can't remember which brand it is any more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Welcome to the forum Boxer. I'm curious what you don't like about the Japanese tooth pullsaws? Once I tried one I all but retired my old Simmons/Nicholson/Disston. It's been so long since I used it last I can't remember which brand it is any more.
same here...
and then there's the Fat Max...


.
 

Attachments

1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top