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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a Oneway Multi Gauge, dial indicator, to precisely set the height of my jointer knives.
Have a Metabo HC260 planer/thicknesser with aluminium tables. When using the dial indicator zeroing it in I do not get a uniform reading across the width of the outfeed table.
I have a discrepancy of 001 inch, 0.025mm, 200th of a mm from one side compared to the other. Am using a Veritas precision straightedge checking the width of the tables, and diagonally across both. I can see very minute gaps, less than paper thin.
I understand that this discrepency is not critical.
That said, setting up the height of the planer knives relative to the outfeed table. As I say on the outfeed table close to the cutter block using the dial gauge zeroed in I set the 0 reading but at the other side I get 001" out, so should I adjust one end of the knives height to make up for this, factor that 0.001" into my setting tolerance?
Cheers.
 

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You could. The only way to perfection if the tables aren't truly level is either shimming or taking them to a machine shop to have them ground level. Just as a reference, I was told that "perfection" on the flatness of the table of my Unisaw was .003". When I set my jointer knives I usually lay a flat piece of hardwood on the outfeed table and let the knife springs push the knives against it then tighten in place. Then I can fine tune the height by a .001 or 2 by raising or lowering the table as required.
 
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I think you are talking metal machine shop tolerances here. A now quite flat bed will deliver an average thickness that is very close. But if you don't use that chunk of wood pretty quickly, it won't be flat anymore anyhow, especially if it changes location. I wouldn't base my zero setting on the bed, I'd produce a board, measure the exact thickness and adjust the thickness indicator to match that. Much of the time the exact thickness isn't the issue so much as consistent thickness is.

If the thickness is diferent from one side to the other, it's shim time, return, repiar time, or time to make sure the blades are level and seated properly. Just my thoughts on this, despite being a fussbudget about precision.
 

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I was talking about a planer, not a jointer in my post. A jointer's tables shold not be far out of level. If your piece is not coming out with a perfectly flat side, at right angles to the sides, you will need to use a Wixey to set the fence to a perfect 90 to the tables. Regrinding flat might be required, but a decent jointer should be very close to perfectly flat. And both halves of the bed should align pretty much perfectly, But regrinding flat and parallel is a major operation. Again, it is wood, not metal, and inspecting and measuring a finished piece of wood fresh from the jointer tells you more than micing the beds. After all, it is the blades and the outfeed table in conjunction with the fence the produces the result. Blade alignment with the outfeed table surface could be a problem, but you can get a jig or use a straight edge to set the blades to be parallel to the outfeed table. Then it's just a matter of getting the fence to a perfect 90 so when you hold the piece to the fence, it will then cut a flat surface with a 90 degree edge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was talking about a planer, not a jointer in my post. A jointer's tables shold not be far out of level.getting the fence to a perfect 90 so when you hold the piece to the fence, it will then cut a flat surface with a 90 degree edge.
OK thanks again.
 
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