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I am making a jig which uses UJK Technology Universal T-Track, it is 19mm wide 9.5mm deep and the length after trimming will be about 700mm channel.

I propose to cut the channel using my Festool router with 1/2 collet and the Festool track which will be clamped to the workpiece.

The board I will use for the jig is a laminated plywood which I think is 18mm deep.

I expect I will need at least two passes to get to 9.5mm depth

I have two questions

1, What type of router bit should I use?

2, In which direction do I move? normally I would move the router away from me

Regards

John
 

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I am making a jig which uses UJK Technology Universal T-Track, it is 19mm wide 9.5mm deep and the length after trimming will be about 700mm channel.

I propose to cut the channel using my Festool router with 1/2 collet and the Festool track which will be clamped to the workpiece.

The board I will use for the jig is a laminated plywood which I think is 18mm deep.

I expect I will need at least two passes to get to 9.5mm depth

I have two questions

1, What type of router bit should I use?

2, In which direction do I move? normally I would move the router away from me

Regards

John

1... plunge cut straight bit... (dia of your choice) and I like my Freud...
2... guide to the right - to you... left side - away from you.... top - to the right... bottom of the router - to the left...

...
 

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Hi, Mike's suggestion is probably your best bet, and about the easiest to manage. Make certain the edges are straight, and that the fixed piece is perfectly square to the side rails. I used to use a simple square for this, but they are not always exact 90 degrees. Buy a set of engineers squares when you want exact 90s, or a really high quality speed square for 90 and 45s.

You will place a piece of the material you are going to insert into the dado to set the width, but I found I needed to add a piece or two of paper in as well to allow for glue.

If you are gluing an edge piece of ply, I'd glue that edge first, then after a minute to let it soak in, I'd glue the dado and insert the piece. You'll only have a few seconds to position the piece to the edges, and be sure you have it set square to the piece with the Dado--that's what those clamp on corner braces are for (see pix).

Once that glue sets, what you set up is no longer adjustable.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So, are you basically saying you need to cut a dado 19mm wide and 9.5mm deep?

If it were me, I would make a template out of 1/2 inch mdf. Then using a 1/2 inch pattern bit, run it around the inside of the template until you get the desired depth.

Check out my exact width dado jig. More info here --> http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fixtures/103234-thoughts-about-my-exact-width-dado-jig.html

Hope you find this helpful.
Mike
Good idea and worth thinking about, thanks
 
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