Router Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just setup the T10432 as my first router table. When I attached a Bosch MRC23 and tried to level the plate to the table I'm able to get the corners flush, but the middle of plate sags a bit instead of staying flat.

I assume this will impact the quality of my work.

Should I just replace the router plate with a new one?
I was also thinking I can physically support the router from the bottom to push it up slightly and remove the sag.

Other thoughts? thanks for the input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,998 Posts
Depends what you do on the table.
If you only work with long pieces of wood (longer than the plate) then it wont make a difference because the wood will be supported each side.
If you want to do model making stuff then it wont give the results you want.
If thats the case, return it as unfit for purpose
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,240 Posts
Not sure the size of the plate is standard, however, if it is, I'd replace it with an aluminum plate of the same size. If the plate IS aluminum now, then you need to have Grizzly replace it with a flat plate. I have a heavy rounter (Triton) so I spent the money on a Woodpecker brand plate, which is about 1/8th thicker than most other plates. Size of the plate is the only thing to be careful about. Many plate makers have specific models for particular brands
 

·
Registered
Paul
Joined
·
2,146 Posts
I had a saggy plate and found it makes the table very inaccurate. Just bevelling or rounding corners would vary in the amount taken off. You apply pressure down and toward the fence, at the ends you get a deeper cut when you're not spanning the plate with the part. I agree with Tom about an aluminum plate. I found a deal on one (Incra) and jumped on it.
 

·
Registered
Retired Engineer, Hobby woodworker
Joined
·
34 Posts
I just setup the T10432 as my first router table. When I attached a Bosch MRC23 and tried to level the plate to the table I'm able to get the corners flush, but the middle of plate sags a bit instead of staying flat.

I assume this will impact the quality of my work.

Should I just replace the router plate with a new one?
I was also thinking I can physically support the router from the bottom to push it up slightly and remove the sag.

Other thoughts? thanks for the input.
Don't receive defective merchandise. Assuming it is a metal plate, lay a straight edge on the plate, corner to corner. If you see any light between the straight and the plate there's a bow in the plate. Contact the manufacturer.
Do the same on the table. It all should be dead flat and if it's brand new they screwed up making it.

I apologize if this insults your intelligence, I don't know if you are totally new to this kind of thing or not.

Let God bless you with the best.
Rev. A
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Don't receive defective merchandise. Assuming it is a metal plate, lay a straight edge on the plate, corner to corner. If you see any light between the straight and the plate there's a bow in the plate. Contact the manufacturer.
Do the same on the table. It all should be dead flat and if it's brand new they screwed up making it.

I apologize if this insults your intelligence, I don't know if you are totally new to this kind of thing or not.

Let God bless you with the best.
Rev. A
thanks. Good advice. I'm definitely new to this.
Tabletop is flat. Plate seems flat, but once installed and leveled with the set-screws (with router attached) it was sagging a bit in the middle. I "shimmed" it with layers of aluminum foil and tape to lift it to level where it was sagging which seems to be working.

I haven't found an aluminum plate that will fit, but looking harder for one will be my next step if this doesn't hold up.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top