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I don't see this configuration used anywhere. Why not?
think it through and you'll come to the correct conclusion...
 

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Because that would be cutting with the back side of the cutter. The cutter turns clockwise, you should be feeding the material across the right side of the cutter not the left.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm truing up a section of some old Wilsonart flooring so I can inset some repair pieces using lap joints in the floor and repair piece. I need flawlessly parallel pieces. I did a test repair and this setup works like a dream.
Hardest part will be making the cutout in the floor perfectly square.
I glued a teplate to the floor using hot glue. Then I used a 1/4" bit the full depth og the material to make the first cut, then changed my bit to 3/4" to make the lap joint. The repair's corners will be rounded in the floor of course, but I found that with some sandpaper on a block of wood, hand shaping the corners in the repair piece isn't all that hard to do. An $800 repair will save the homeowner from replacing a $9000+ floor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If it makes any difference, the material I am using has a paper like consistency like Masonite. I's less than 3/8" thick. I cut the section to about 1/16" oversize, then use the fence to creep up on the width by 64th's or less. Just sayin', that I'm not hogging off 1/4 inch per pass with 3/4 inch thick maple.

I don't see my configuration in that link. I see one that's just the opposite and it says avoid climb cut. (image 2) Mine isn't a climb cut if I'm feeding into the bit instead of with it's rotation.

That said, I appreciate the input greatly. I'm here to learn.
I suppose a feather board pushing against my work piece. One hold down or featherbboard on top of it might make it safer. That would keep it from raising up I suppose. It's not gonna happen in the repair that I'm going to do. I'm just shaving off a little dust, one pass at a time, 'till the repair section drops in..
 

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The router is in a table. Unless I have a Chinese router this ought to be running the correct direction....into the work piece.
You have the rotation going backwards. Start spinning your finger around in the correct direction if you had it handheld (clockwise) and then while still spinning your finger turn your finger facing up. What was clockwise facing down is now counterclockwise when facing up.

In that orientation the cutter is moving the same direction as you are feeding so the bit wants to self feed without any help from you. The cutter can't cut the material off as fast as the bit tries to self feed so very bad things can happen like shooting the workpiece across the room at barely sub sonic speeds and /or bending the armature. Years ago someone mentioned embedding their workpiece in the far wall in their shop.

Take the Wilsonart and put it up against a straight edge. Put a piece of panel board on it that has been ripped to the correct width. Clamp together and trim with a flush trim bit.
 

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My diagram???
Did you mean my link to the Rockler diagram?
The text is the explanation for the diagram...which does say "AVOID"

The text is reprinted below:
 

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I've seen what Randy's doing but done in a custom jig that controls the workpiece from both edges. Ie it can't go anywhere and as Randy said only a paper thin piece of materiel was being removed.
What my guy was doing was lightly machining planking for a strip built kayak. It was already ripped to width but I can't rember why he was doing a pass through the router jig(?) a slight bevel maybe???
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm totally confused. The diagram shows feeding the board into the tool same direction the bit is rotating. That would obviously grab the board and launch the work piece out of the table. I'm feeding the opposite direction ...into or against the tool, not with it.

I guess I'd just like to know what could happen. The diagram shows something that, well, looks obvious. ..scary just thinking about it.
 

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I'm totally confused. The diagram shows feeding the board into the tool same direction the bit is rotating. That would obviously grab the board and launch the work piece out of the table. I'm feeding the opposite direction ...into or against the tool, not with it.

I guess I'd just like to know what could happen. The diagram shows something that, well, looks obvious. ..scary just thinking about it.
Randy; where the confusion is coming from is because you're running the material trapped between the fence and the bit, as the text in my link discusses; feeding from a different direction isn't the issue, it's still dangerous! The bit should be tucked into the fence where it belongs, and the work-piece outbound from the fence.
I know this isn't what you want to do and I completely understand your perspective, but for the reasons given in the text I posted, it's still hazardous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You have the rotation going backwards. Start spinning your finger around in the correct direction if you had it handheld (clockwise) and then while still spinning your finger turn your finger facing up. What was clockwise facing down is now counterclockwise when facing up.

In that orientation the cutter is moving the same direction as you are feeding so the bit wants to self feed without any help from you. The cutter can't cut the material off as fast as the bit tries to self feed so very bad things can happen like shooting the workpiece across the room at barely sub sonic speeds and /or bending the armature. Years ago someone mentioned embedding their workpiece in the far wall in their shop.

Take the Wilsonart and put it up against a straight edge. Put a piece of panel board on it that has been ripped to the correct width. Clamp together and trim with a flush trim bit.
Here's what I think you are saying.
Obviously in the first image, the work piece is trapped by the fence and it's gonna launch forwards into the wall.
In the second image, you're saying it can grab the piece and pull it away from the fence and throw it back towards you.

Like Danivan said, a simple fence or feather board ought to do what's needed to keep control.
 

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A safer technique would be to use your router table as a jointer...

And yes, I realize that doesn't address the issue of parallelism, but he does have a suggestion for that in the second link.
 
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