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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just read something that I never heard or experienced. It claims that when ripping a piece the wood can warp toward the fence and can cause kickback.
They advised to use a block clamped to the fence that extends no further than just after the blade. This will allow for the warpage to not bind and push the stock over against the blade.
I don't see how you can rip very precise with this method.
Has anybody heard of this before?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I use that method for cross cuts, not ripping. For ripping I use a splitter, and make sure that the fence is properly aligned with the blade
I also use it for cross cuts as it allows me to set it as a jig. Plus I don't use a fence and miter at the same time for a through cut. I also use a riving knife when ever I can.
That said. The artical stated that the short fence piece was needed in addition to the riving/splitter.
Oh well, I'll just keep doing it as I was trained.
 

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These are expensive but worth the price. Not only do they prevent kickback they also hold the wood tight to the fence to keep things from moving around.

 

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Some fences won't like the Beisemeyer, but the unifence, altendorf fences, etc will adjust back and allow only a percentage before or after the blade.

Maple is really bad about this. I had a perfectly straight board 5" wide ripped down to 2" and get all twisted out of shape...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here there are some comments about this topic.


Re: Long Fence vs Short Fence on Table Saw;)
It seem's this problem has been recognized for many years. I appreciate all the information. One thing I noticed was the tendency for some to rip the cut with the narrow side toward the fence. I was always told this is improper and could lead to the thin piece being shot out backwards. Is this wrong? And should I start ripping in this fashion?
 

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It seem's this problem has been recognized for many years. I appreciate all the information. One thing I noticed was the tendency for some to rip the cut with the narrow side toward the fence. I was always told this is improper and could lead to the thin piece being shot out backwards. Is this wrong? And should I start ripping in this fashion?
I have a full size sliding euro type with an altendrof style fence. I use a riving knife and/or just stick a wooden wedge when i cut any substantial length or thickness of "real" wood. Havent felt the issue that you discuss.....but maybe it has to do with the fact that these large euro style machines are super powerful so with the riving knife in place i just plow through
M
 

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It seem's this problem has been recognized for many years. I appreciate all the information. One thing I noticed was the tendency for some to rip the cut with the narrow side toward the fence. I was always told this is improper and could lead to the thin piece being shot out backwards. Is this wrong? And should I start ripping in this fashion?
You were told wrong...shops run numerous pieces of scribe and edging this way...

Something you read off the internet?
 

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the side between the blade and the fence is the side that the fence is calibrated to....so, assuming you have a well calibrated tablesaw - as @Rebelwork Woodworking said - you would rip thin strips this way.
of course if the strips you rip are REALLY thin - you need some sort of zero clearance throat plate and a suitable pushblock

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You were told wrong...shops run numerous pieces of scribe and edging this way...

Something you read off the internet?
I may well have been told wrong. The idea of the thinner cut being between the blade and fence makes sense to me if you need to saw several pieces the same width as you do not need to reset the fence after each cut.
That all said I'll stick with doing it the way I described. Besides most times it would make using hold downs or feather boards easier, not to forget, push sticks.
 

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A long time ago, I had a piece of ply that was a little warped. The blade caught it and shot it at me at about 100 mph. Right in the solar plexis. Hurt like hell for a long time.

Take the time to set your fence correctly to the blade, and the blade to the miter slots. I keep my biesmeyer type fence adjusted about 4/1000 ths out, away from the blade. I also keep a riving knife in the saw for almost all cuts. The riving knife keeps the cut lined up with the blade and keeps it from closing up or shifting. When the wood shifts, the blade coming up from the rear catches the warped wood and shoots it at you.

I don't like to trap the piece between fence and blade, once struck, twice shy. For narrow strips, I have a jig that sits just in front of the blade, The jig sets the width of the cut, and I put the wood in and position the fence. Yes, I move the fence, but I feel safer doing that. I often need these narrow strips to set an adequate thickness rabbet to hold a canvas frame. Frame material is often thin on the inside edge, so strips make for a really nice look.

That's my preference, but certainly not the only way to get good results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A long time ago, I had a piece of ply that was a little warped. The blade caught it and shot it at me at about 100 mph. Right in the solar plexis. Hurt like hell for a long time.

Take the time to set your fence correctly to the blade, and the blade to the miter slots. I keep my biesmeyer type fence adjusted about 4/1000 ths out, away from the blade. I also keep a riving knife in the saw for almost all cuts. The riving knife keeps the cut lined up with the blade and keeps it from closing up or shifting. When the wood shifts, the blade coming up from the rear catches the warped wood and shoots it at you.

I don't like to trap the piece between fence and blade, once struck, twice shy. For narrow strips, I have a jig that sits just in front of the blade, The jig sets the width of the cut, and I put the wood in and position the fence. Yes, I move the fence, but I feel safer doing that. I often need these narrow strips to set an adequate thickness rabbet to hold a canvas frame. Frame material is often thin on the inside edge, so strips make for a really nice look.

That's my preference, but certainly not the only way to get good results.
As my newest saw is a used one and the idiot tossed the old riving knife I ordered a manufactured one. I know I could have made one. But liability insurance is a good thing. Plus the saw manufacturer no longer sells a replacement.
Before I had a saw with a riving knife or splitter I used to always stand off to the fence side to avoid being impaled.
I like your idea for a jig. I'll look into that.
 

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Automation has been around a long time since the early 80's. This is why the Chinese have been beating us up for years.
They spend countless hours trying to evolve with production while Americans ARe at the beach on Saturday..

Americans got a lil too confortable. ..
 
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