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I was sawing thin strips on the table saw for end grain cutting boards, the strips were 3' long x 3/4 & 1/2" wide. I was using a 3/8" wide push stick about a foot long. I had the two 3/4" strips done and one of the 1/2" strips done, on the second 1/2" strip i moved the stock piece through and clear but inadvertently touched the blade with the push stick, got a violent kickback and sore palm. Here's my question. What model of that grrripper tool do I need? There are a few different models and several accessories available and is pretty confusing to me. Thanks
 

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I have the micro jig gripper, and yes, its expensive. But its incredibly well made and thought out. You can adjust it to fit almost any situation on a bandsaw, router table, or even table saw.
I have no regrets spending that money for something so versatile right out of the box.

I should add that I'm not known for throwing money around.
 

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Thanks guys, I appreciate your input.
 

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I have a couple of them for pushing long pieces through. All models have the basic structure, they just add on a couple of accessories, in particular, the wide foot. I never use it, really awkward. You can get a 1/8th foot which is really handy for narrow cuts. I always try to keep the widest part of the wood against the fence to reduce the chance of kickback. Early on with my old table saw, I tried to cut a warped piece of ply and it kicked back, hitting me in the center of my chest. It was bruised and sore for months. They come at you at about 100 mph. Won't ever try that again. Just get the Gripper, I don't think I've ever seen a bad review on this or any other site.
 

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Only got kickback once. I let up on the push stick and the blade caught a small piece of wood. Have two faint scars on my wrist. I was around heavy manufacturing for years. I learned about 55 years ago not to stand in the way of IFP- identified flying pieces. I now remember to stand off to the side when using the TS.
 

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I have found my Gripper one of the best safety tools in the shop. I use it every day I'm in the shop and have several versions. What I was lacking was the 1/8" plate to add which I had originally thought would never be needed but was very wrong. Any table saw operation requires thought and consideration but making really thin cuts takes the proper tool and the Gripper or similar should be adjusted and used accordingly. The trip to the emergency room will likely cost you more than a new tool and I'd rather have the new tool rather than a regret.
 

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I was sawing thin strips on the table saw for end grain cutting boards, the strips were 3' long x 3/4 & 1/2" wide. I was using a 3/8" wide push stick about a foot long. I had the two 3/4" strips done and one of the 1/2" strips done, on the second 1/2" strip i moved the stock piece through and clear but inadvertently touched the blade with the push stick, got a violent kickback and sore palm. Here's my question. What model of that grrripper tool do I need? There are a few different models and several accessories available and is pretty confusing to me. Thanks
These shots shows my GR-200 GRR-Ripper which I wouldn't like to live without.
 

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Harry’s second photo shows an additional key point about the GRIPPER, how easy it is to independently adjust the height of each leg to accommodate the thickness of the wood.
 

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I don't disagree with what folks are saying about the GRR-Ripper; I have one and it works well. But even though there's an attachment enabling one to go thinner than 1/4", I think it's far safer to move the offcut to the left side of the blade for thinner strips. That is especially true if you have anti-kickback pawls instead of a riving knife. There are several techniques for this, the most common being a stop on the left of the blade.

There is a nice breakdown of the options on the wood whisperer site. I would post the URL but alas, "You are only allowed to post URLs once you have at least 10 posts."

A shop-made left-side miter slot stop is easy to make. They can be slightly finicky if your fence moves (even slightly) when you lock it down but you'll figure this out quickly.
 

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Steven
I see you joined 4 years ago, 9 more posts and you can post URLs
it is there to keep spam down!
 

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Watch you fingers ( I had to pay stupid tax at ER). I use masking tape and gorilla Gel super glue. Run a piece of 3/4 scrap plywood. Make it wide enough to keep you hands clear. I made a handle for mine and mounted it a slight angle in this will keep piece tight to fence for the length of cut. Now the secret is to stand plywood on edge run a piece of 3/4 making tape, Then on the piece wish to orient it and place masking tape to the edge opposite of your desired cut end. Place SG along one side of sled or work , whichever is shorter. place sled against fence and the press the two pieces of masking tape together and set desired size of wood on the left side of blade, push thru There will not be any stupid tax to pay. Separate sled and wood by breaking the tape will let go from wood so nothing is glued together is the masking tape. I was ripping 1/16 and 1/8 strips and used this tool. ordered it at amazon works fantastic. The piece will be uniform You cannot make it for less POWERTEC 71059 Thin Rip Table Saw Jig. I have grr-rip but the toll is much better
 

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I've got a Grrrrrripper (however you spell it), and like it. Won it, didn't buy it. I'm 77, started out helping my grandfather when I was probably 7 or 8. Started using power tools in 9th grade, table saw in 10th grade. No riving knife or kick back thingies on my saw. Never had a kickback yet, and don't plan on having one. BUT, just in case, I always stand out of line with the blade. Learned that one in the 10th grade, when our shop teacher demonstrated kickback, and described what caused it. And I still remember that piece of wood hitting the wall. Unless I am holding a piece of wood well away from the blade, I use push blocks, not so often push sticks. I set my blade so it just cuts the top of the wood, then use a push block, with a handle, thick enough that I can pass right over the blade and it will just make a very small cut on the bottom of the push block, and impossible to cut me. It helps to be a bit scared of the saw, or anytool with whirly parts that can bite you; it make you careful.

You see pictures and videos of people standing in line with the blade of a saw, a lot of time supposedly skilled woodworkers. Which just about guarantees that if there is kickback, they are going to get hit. Standing out of line with the blade is one of the best safety measures you can take with a table saw.
 

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Another approach i’ve Found when ripping thin pieces is to use a magnetic clamp to hold the shop vac hose just to the left of the piece being cut off The vacuum will pull the thin piece over and hold it in place. I’ve never tried for pieces wider than 1/2” however. Believe the approach was originally posted on this forum but not sure by who.
obviously not a cure for kickback but helpful with the upside of pulling off some sawdust as well.
 

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I learned how to rip thin pieces of stock the hard way and got my finger. I was very lucky to come away with just a nasty cut to the index finger that left a nice scar. Since then, if I need a piece of stock less than a push stick, I cut it from a much larger piece. For example, if my piece needs to be 2" x 1/4", I will cut a piece 5" (by 8' or whatever I need to get the lineal feet needed) and then start my 1/4" rip. Taking it nice and slow, the blade is never exposed except at the end. I can even flip the board to the opposite side when done and run another 1/4" run. Then, after the 1/4 rips are in the 5" board, I will lay the board down and rip the 2" needed and no finger(s) are subjected to blade danger. Yet, with this method, it is very obvious that I do not have my blade (top) guard on.
 

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The Grrippers are nice, and I now own three, one of them has the narrow side removed and it is dedicated for use on the router table. The other two are mostly for use on the table saw, the two provide the ability to hand over hand feed long boards when ripping. The orange push stick in Harry's photo #5, or any of it's similar designs are very dangerous to use as the primary pushing device on a table saw, because they fail to hold the work down as it's being pushed through the cut, and the rear of the blade can lift the piece easily and throw it at you. They are OK for other purposes, and can be used as a second tool to hold the work against the fence, but your primary "push stick" needs to be of a design that both holds the work piece down and against the fence, as well as push it forward through the cut and beyond the blade. During any of these cuts your hands and fingers should never get less than 6" from the blade or cutter, unless it's fully protected by the pusher device, like when holding the handle of a Grripper.

I use my Grrippers a lot, but still use my shop made pushers for certain operations on my table saw, but every one of them holds the work down as well as pushes it forward, and my hand is always on the handle of it to keep it 6" or more away from the spinney sharp thing. Whenever I'm about to use one of my woodworking tools I mentally go through the process that I'm planning. If any part of the process will put my fingers or any other part of my body closer than 6" to that sharp spinney thing, I'll find another way to do it.

I've been woodworking or helping my dad and uncles do woodworking since I was about 8. I'm almost 78 now, and still have all ten with no scars from those sharp spinney things. Scars from other things yes, but not from woodworking tools.

Charley
 

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Like Charley, I preplan almost every cut, working out how to do it best/safely. For thin strips, which I cut often, I have a Rockler thin strip jig, that lets me cut same size strips on the outside edge of the blade and so the fence is moved and the outside piece isn't trapped against the blade. A piece trapped against the fence is more likely to kick back because it's easy to catch it on the blade as you push the last bit through. That's where the Grripper's 1/8th foot comes into play. The alternative as the piece gets thinner and thinner is a long, skinny push block. The pictures are of a variety of push sticks and simple shop made push blocks, any of which will increase safety.
 

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