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Noticed my table saw blade mechanism was harder than normal to lower today, like I was cranking through resistance. Looked underneath it and saw a lot of sawdust buildup on the mechanisms. I’m thinking this is what I felt, the gears cranking through excess caked on dust. So I’m going to clean all this off and see if it helps. My question is what do I lubricate the gears with? Do I use anything at all? It seems this will just make dust stick to it even more.
 

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dry lube such as TriFlow...
it doesn't collect dust and makes for a non-stick surface...
years and years of VOE says this works...

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VOE says WD is a mistake and all myth... it's a wet something or another that attracts all kinds of trash... does way more harm than good in the scheme of things... I've made a lot of money cleaning/fixing/replacing/repairing after the fact...
It makes for a humongous mess [remember this come finishing time] and if it gets into an electric motor kiss the motor goodbye... It's also prone to flash fire and really doesn't work all that well on anything but it's convenient...
I'm real partial to Triflow but most any dry lube will work well providing it's has Teflon/PFTE in it... [higher percentage by volume is more gooder]...
CRC, Tiolube, KG and DuPont each have several most excellent industrial spec DRY SOLID FILM lubricants..
Criteria - dries dry to the touch, high pressure load bearing, contains Teflon/PFTE, barrier forming, extreme temperature range, [usually -100 to +500F] isn't hygroscopic, does not collect dirt, not flammable in dry state, chemical resistant, does not contain silicone, has a long list of compatibles and is really very long lasting... or any of or all the features WD hasn't got any of....

one thing about dry solid film lubricants is that when you apply them and you think that you didn't apply enough you have probably applied too much..
very, very little goes a loooooooooooooooong way...
Just wait until you do your saw's arbor mechanism w/ dry lube.. you and your saw will never be the same... You'll treat everything that moves in the shop in short order... Please thoroughly clean whatever before lubing..
It's a great release agent too...
Dry Film Lubricants are high performance coatings made up of very fine particles of lubricating agents blended with binders and other special additives. Once cured, these lubricating agents bond to the part surface as a solid film which reduces galling, seizing and fretting and protects against corrosion. Through the combination of these properties, dry film lubricants greatly improve the wear life of coated parts.
Dry film/solid film lubricants allow for operating pressures above the load-bearing capacity of normal greases and oils. They are also less prone to collecting soil particulates than greases and oils. In some applications, the coating is self-burnishing, leading to improved, rather than decreased, performance over time. Some blends of dry film/solid film lubricants are also temperature and chemical resistant allowing for their use in harsh environments such as jet engines where exposure to aviation fuel and extreme temperatures are the norm.
 

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WD40 stands for Water Displacer 40th attempt. Displacing water in, for example, the electrical connector between truck and trailer on snowy slushy days. All the log truck drivers up here keep a can in the cab. That is what it’s really good for.

One way to clean the threads is to wrap a cord around the screw and spin it from one end to the other if you can get at it.
 
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I have used PB Blaster - it works great, but the smell is atrocious!
I use DuPont's Teflon product that Stick listed above and that stuff is great.
It is the best thing going for squeaky garage doors/tracks.
Stick's info is SPOT-ON!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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This is the type of lubricant you want to use if you have a CNC. I have serviced a few machines that people had been using wet type lubricants and among them WD40 and the wet lube attracted dust, built up and packed into the bearing pockets and bearings and caused them to grab and make high pitched squeaks with every move. They just added more lubricant to remedy the problem but it just made things worse.

After cleaning up everything, and that was not fun and took forever, the machines were re-lubed with dry Teflon lube and they were surprised how much difference it made. I haven't been back for service on any of those CNC's for that problem.

Bottom line wet lubricants and saw dust don't go together!
 
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I use Johnsons Paste Wax, applied to the gears and ways with an old tooth brush. It develops a dry surface that does not attract dust, but stays in place and does it's job well.
I use Tri-Flow for the pivot points. AVOID using anything with silicone in it, because it seems to eventually get on everything including your project and you will have all kinds of finishing problems. Silicone products are banned from my shop. I also use Johnsons Paste Wax on my cast iron,applied and then wiped and buffed after it dries to a haze. I do this to the table surfaces to stop rust and also to make things slide easily. I add another coat any time the boards don't seem to slide across the table easily.

Charley
 

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This is the type of lubricant you want to use if you have a CNC. I have serviced a few machines that people had been using wet type lubricants and among them WD40 and the wet lube attracted dust, built up and packed into the bearing pockets and bearings and caused them to grab and make high pitched squeaks with every move. They just added more lubricant to remedy the problem but it just made things worse.

Bottom line wet lubricants and saw dust don't go together!
you know WD will kill bearings in very short order.....
it dissolves the bearing's lubricant...
 
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Mike,

Can you use that on the tubes and lead screws instead of oil?
 
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Mike,

Can you use that on the tubes and lead screws instead of oil?
Stick beat me to it. WD 40, 3in1 oil, motor oil and other lubrcants that stay wet are not good to use because of the sawdust build up. Dry lubes are the best.
 

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