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I am new in this forum and recently I bought my first table saw and I wonder if someone can give me some tips or ideas for a beginners project. I saw this article https://homyden.com/table-saw-projects-beginners/ which describes some good projects and I want to know what do you think about those projects and recommend me others. Would you try anything of those projects? Which one?
 

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Sara, first let me make you aware of a guy named Ted that sells plans on the net. His plans are not very good, in fact, they are bad. He operates just inside the law so just be aware.

One place for you to look is You-Tube. When they show you how to build something a lot of them sell the plans and some even give them away. Also, there are wood magazines. You can buy plans from them and they do have some free plans. Woodsmith has some plans you might like. You can get them online. Keep us aware of what you are building and ask questions if needed. We really like pictures too.
 

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Some of my first proects were tool stands for my other tools. That and a nice bookshelf. I do strongly suggest that you get a Wixey digital angle gauge. You place it on the table, set the zero setting, then place it on the blade and adjust it until ir reads exactly 90. You can't count on the markings on the saw to set an exact angle. It costs about $30 on Amazon. if you make cuts that are not 90, you won't be able to fit pieces together and glue won't stick. I'm attaching an pdf of an article on the 17 things that accellerated my learning to do woodworking. It may save you a bundle in wood and tools over time. One other project you might consider is called a table saw sled. It will make cutting on the saw much safer and it will be something you'll use forever. There are lots of videos on YouTube on how to make a table saw sled.

One last thing, get and use a good mask. Sawdust does terrible things to your lungs. There's more on this in the pdf., and I've included a respirator sold by Rockler Woodworking, which uses four batteries to pull shop air through a filter. I find it makes all the difference for my breathing.

Here's the article, it's long.
 

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First tablesaw projects should be an out-feed table of some sort, a workbench, then shelves and cabinets for storage.

The out-feed table for your tablesaw is a safety item that every tablesaw needs to operate safely. It keeps your wood from falling on the ground after feeding it through the saw, and you from trying to grab it or hold on to it leaning over a spinning blade.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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Hi, Sarah(?); perhaps you could fill out your profile...
It's difficult to make suggestions for folks, not knowing their level of experience or what tools they have to work with.
Assuming it's only the TS that you're asking about, and that you have some shop experience, the projects basically breakdown into casework...bookcases, cupboards, etc., hardwood objects like cutting boards, chessboards, small boxes (jewellery, urns, coffee mills, etc) or utility projects like wine racks, tables, furniture (beds, stools, etc.).
My own motivation usually flows from a need for something rather than a random idea, but that's just me.
I think having a need and a budget makes the decision making process somewhat more clear.
Sometimes using common lumber, 1x4 Spruce/Pine/Fir makes way more sense than splurging on Maple or similar.
A LOT of us really dislike working with Medium Density Fibreboard (MDF) mostly because it's brutally dusty to work with, and frankly, not very attractive; but again, to each their own.
The whole Table saw experience is a huge topic and a long learning curve. The primary focus at this point is to learn what's safe and what isn't!
There are a lot of great You Tube vids BUT there are also some really dangerous suggestions; the trick is to spot the bad ones, before you get hurt.
If you're just getting started, please use your bladeguard and anti kickback pawls whenever possible.
Also make yourself some basic pushsticks.
I'll try and get a moment to take a picture of my handsaw handle style pushstick; it both pushes and stops your material from rising up.

Please, please, please take TS safety SERIOUSLY!
 

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Push sticks...
Totally agree with push sticks. Make them, and USE them. If you are like me, you will need to keep making them. I use one, next time I need it, can't find it, so it's make another. They do not need to be fancy, just to work properly. I make mine out of leftover pieces, and don't hold to any measurements or such, just a general shape. I would not use really nice wood for them, they tend to get chewed up by the sawblade and after a bit are useless. I use mostly 1/2" plywood, because that is what I mostly use. I cut mine out with my scrollsaw, or bandsaw.
 
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Welcome aboard Sara. The points raised above are all well made and we look forward to your posts.

Might one inquire as to which TS you will be using? Selecting a blade for the project based on the cuts to be made and type of wood is another critical point.
 

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Lots of good suggestions and information. I particularly liked the suggestion to make an outfeed table. This hooks on the back side of your table saw and is level with or SLIGHTLY below the saw's table. 18-24 inches by the width of the saw and it wings. Rockler makes some hardware that goes on most saws so you can attach a table top. 2 fold down legs with bolts for levelers on the back hold it up. You can also make a conventional table for this purpose, although it's nice to be able to remove and put away the fold down type (I haven't folded mine down in years). Don't put off the dust mask! Tell us a little more about your saw and workshop setup.

The pictures are 1) a folding outfeed table (like mine) 2) a collection of various push sticks, even a 2x4 will do in many cases. 3) a commercial (Rockler Woodworking) sled (I like the ability to set angles). 4) The Wixey angle gauge in use - lets you make really square cuts (get one).
 

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Sawblades. You can use a combination saw blade that will work for both cross dutting (across the grain) and ripping (Cut with the grain). The number of teeth is one factor. Cross cut blades have more teeth, but don't have to carry off as much waste as with a rip cut. A rip blade has fewer teeth and deepere gullets (space between blades) to pull out all the sawdust. Freud makes a blade called the glue line, which is really a combination blade. It has sets of teeth that cut an an angle , then a follow up tooth that cuts a flat bottomed cut for things like making a spline. A spline is a groove in both sides of a joint with a narrow piece of thin strip wood that is glued into both sides of the groove. It makes a very strong joint, and is easy to make on the table saw. I use them on the corners of picture frames to add strength.

Splines also make it really easy to make strong boxes as well.

The problem with most YouTube videos on table saws is that they remove the safety devices that cover the blade, which is just asking for trouble. I have trained myself to NEVER get my hands closer than 6 inches from a moving blade on the table saw. I ALWAYS us push sticks or a great safety device called the Grrripper, which has legs that allow the exposed blade pass safely through. You can't always use the blade safety cover, when that happens, I use the Grrripper--It lets you press down, forward and against the fence all at the same time.

Not sure if it is in this collection, but there was an early season episode on using the table saw that was very good, here's a link to check it out, again they removed the safety devices: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=woodsmith+shop+full+episodes
 

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Welcome to the forum, Sara. A good early addition to your table saw would a crosscut sled.
 
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I am new in this forum and recently I bought my first table saw and I wonder if someone can give me some tips or ideas for a beginners project. I saw this article https://homyden.com/table-saw-projects-beginners/ which describes some good projects and I want to know what do you think about those projects and recommend me others. Would you try anything of those projects? Which one?
Welcome aboard. What kind of table saw did you buy? Post a picture.
 

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@ SaraHandcraft

Your post really bothers me, do you know someone who knows how to use a table saw that can walk you through the safest way to use it? Just reading a book and walking up to a TS turning it on and using it is not the right way to start. The TS is the most dangerous power tool in the shop if you don't know the correct way to operate it. Your mind has to be on what/ how you are cutting at all times, the minute it wanders you can get hurt badly. The worst situation you can get into is being half way through the cut and realizing your in trouble,there is no way to back up. Is there a woodworking store near by that has classes on wood working like Woodcraft or Rockler that you can attend and learn the safest way to use one?
Just hoping the safest way for you.
Herb
 

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Ladies are welcome to the forum, Sandra Handcraft.
Please pay attention to all these guys. Post some pictures about your projects.
 

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I found two books at a used book store. Titles- The Complete Table Saw Book by North American Affinity Clubs and The Table Saw Book by R. J. De Cristoforo. Lots of good info with projects, safety tips, etc.
 
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