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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, What do you use to protect your cast iron equipment and tools. Reason I ask, Is I live in NJ, 25min from Jersey Shore (Not sure if that matters)
But I'm having a hard time protecting my Table Saw from Surface Rust over a an extended amount of time. Say a week.
I just finished my first full can of T9. I also applied multiple coats of Johnson's Paste Wax. Even Rustoleum's Rust Inhibitor in a desperate attempt.
Some of the reasons I think this rust is forming is the garage where the TS is located has no air movement, and is muggy. Ive added a Dry Lock moisture remover and installed a Grizzly Air Filter but only run it when I'm working.
I could be touching the table with my fingers (And usually I'm dripping with sweat)
So maybe I'm not wiping it down as well as I could be, or wiping it off as well as I think... for that matter.
With winter coming I'd like to protect my "Gumare" as best as possible. She'll still see action, just not as frequent.
I figured I'd try a product like
Top Cote
Dri Cote
Empire Tool 6D
Top Saver
But wanted your feed back first.
Anyone else running into similar nuisances..

And any recommendations for cleaning out the saw dust from the trunnions, Blade assembly, ect...
I'm doing what I can with an air compressor using a air dryer. I used Marine Grease in the Trunnions and Gear Worms trying to maintain it, which attracted the saw dust like flies to Shissh lol
So something to spray on and wipe off which will clean protect and lube would be a dream come true!!


Thank You all,
Your my go to guy's...& gals:unsure: so thank you again.
 

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Doug
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DynaGlide Dry Lube Spray Buy Seperately or by the Case

http://www.magnate.net/index.cfm?event=showProductGroup&theID=225



dyna glide can be purchased from a lot of different sources, it's a great dry film lubricant for trunions, etc. Order it from Magnate.net and pick up a handful of great bits to make the shipping worthwhile

I've had good luck with the boesheild t9 in virginia's humidity, and the johnsons paste wax works great on my scrollsaw table. I've got to reapply it regularly because I'm running my hands across it all the time, but it does work.

I don't know how much more humid it is in your neck of the woods, sorry you're not having good results with it.
 

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As my handle implies I live on the gulfcoast, east Mobile Bay area, so it's humid here, too. On top of that we challenge Seattle, WA for the most rainfall for a US city, so it's damp most of the time. The only cast iron top I have is on my band saw. I didn't attend to it as well as I should have in the beginning and rust began to set in. I removed it with my RO palm sander, a green scotch bright pad, and simple green. After that I topped it with nothing more than good ol' Johnson's. That was several weeks ago and so far so good. You seem to be taking a more aggressive approach so I'm a little at odds as to why you have the problems you're seeing. You may have more salt in the air than we do or there may be some thing in your sweat or skin oils that is at issue. Try gloves and wiping down the surface well after each use and see if that helps.

Good luck.
GCG
 

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Just for what its worth, I use a cut-to-size piece of MDF to cover my thickness planer bed when not in use, and it certainly extends the time between treatments - also on my surface planer. (I'm about half a mile from the sea, without too much humidity, so possibly this won't work as well in more severe conditions.)
 

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I've used Dri-Cote and Top Cote with good results but I don't live near salt water or in an area that has high humidity more often than not. Winters here are actually too dry! Wood checks easily and finishes dry out! Kvetch, kvetch, kvetch.
 

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My Approach

I live in SE Oklahoma and the humidity is high but no salt. When I know that I am going to leave my shop for a week or two; I spray on a coat of T9, smooth it out with a Scotch Brite so I don't remove very much. I then put a piece of hardboard over it and then cover it with a old sheet (for dust). When I start to use it again on a regular basis, I wipe the T-9 with a clean rag and use the tool.
I don't know how big your shop is but you may have to get a dehumidifier and leave it on when you are not there.
I also use graphite on the moving parts. It doesn't attract the saw dust as fast.
Regardless of all the above, I still fight rust on a regular basis. Sometimes it seems that I do more maintenance than woodworking.
 

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Anthony; You mentioned that the air in your shop "has no air movement". I'm guessing that has a lot to do with it. Can you crack a window open a bit, and leave a fan running gently?
I fight salt air here as well (about 800' from the tide line) but thank G*d, the temps pretty moderate (Pacific Northwest). Night temp dropped to 8C. last night and that's when the problem really kicks in. The difference between day and night temp means the air is supersaturated at night, and the moisture will condense on any cold surface...not to mention everything outside. There's so much dew it's like it rains every night.
 

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If I were having the rust problems like being discussed I might just be tempted to reach for a can of light gray floor and porch enamel etc. for a cheep fix. A coat of paste wax after it was well cured might be in order too. After all, paint has worked fairly well on ships for many years to prevent rust.
 

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Patrick made a comparison. But he truly has higher humidity (hands down). We only get 52 days a year without rain and a lot of those 52 are still overcast or foggy. He gets sun and I am jealous!!! We both have a lot of slat in the air.

When it gets below freezing, in the morning, my saw and other cast iron equipment will sweat, especially if I turn on a heater. I don't have a problem with rust with any of it. Well maybe every once in a while.

I initially spray stuff down with "Kroil," which is the best I've found for loosening rust. I scrub it down, then wipe it off. that works for the cleaning part. Then I rub in a paste wax. I feel a rust penitrant displaces the water, but that it still needs something in the surface pores (and cast iron is porous) to protect it. When it's cold, I heat up the surface with my heat gun so it gets into the pours.

That at least has worked for me, here in the Northwest, for years.
 

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Theo
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My tools are all in a small shop, 8X12', year round. I keep the one window open about 6" in winter, more in summer. Johnson's Paste Wax works well for me. I'm in central NC.
 

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Tried a desiccant?

T-9 has worked pretty well for me. I agree with another writer that some circulation would be helpful. You may also want to use a desiccant (silica) to help control the humidity in the area of the saw. DampRid is a product that is ready made for that purpose. There are some instructions on making homemade desiccant products which can be found if you Google "humidity removal" . Depending on how bad your problem is, this may not be a very cost effective solution. You must also be careful if you decide to make your own homemade product as silica can cause huge problems with inhaled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Not sure what happened to my last reply around a week ago.... I probably failed to post it... I feel like a "Turd" now. Specially when so much thought and consideration goes into your reply's.... Which really means a lot to me!! Really!!!!
It amazes me how people across the world can be more concerned with my problem.....then my own wife....LMAO :-D So thank you again!! It gives me a great reply to, " Who cares "...... My wife and I like to ruffle each other feathers...lol
The table saw is in my garage which I'm slowly converting into a shop,
The walls are lined with all sorts of chemicals, paints, and quick fixes. Which range from decades old to present.
I ran a sweat test and sure enough this is probably where most of the rust spots are coming from. If I don't wipe & I mean wipe down where ever I touch....drip or sweat... or even lean.......bingo within a day, I wake up with a light brown rust, Which within 2 more days, Will turn into dark redish brown rust, almost close to pitting.
The garage is pretty tight and the table saw is in front of, or right underneath all the quick fix sprays and chemicals, so I'm constantly leaning on the saw. Or using it to support my short yoga classes trying to reach the higher shelves....lol
I really wanted to try the Top Cote and Dry Cote, but went with Empire's 6D Tool Saver.
Which I'll follow up with in a little bit..... Daddy Duty,....Calls.
Thanks again,
Quick Question..... Do you think all the chemicals are intensifying the reaction process. Or rusting?
 

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Sweat is normally low in ph (somewhat acidic). Add to that the natural body oils and secretions and everyone has a natural predisposition to be a contributor in corrosion. If your chemistry contributes more than the statistical "norm" (still not sure if that's the case) then it could be anything from genetics to diet to state of health. Best bet is to pay particular attention to end of day basic cleanup and maintenance.

GCG
 
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