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Howdy Mike... Thank you for the kind words :)

I put a link to a thread on the sled in reply to TRN's post. If you would like more details, let me know and I'll answer as best I can.
As for the depth of the dado cut, your exactly right. The one big issue with my sled is the thickness of the base. Mine is just a hair over 1" thick. WAY, WAY to thick!!!! The darn thing weighs a ton :). Sturdy as all hell, has remained dead nuts accurate for several years now of regular use. My comment was to serve only as a reminder and something to think about. When I built the sled, I was wanting to have the ability to do dado's with it. And I suppose I still do, just never have. For that operation, I just preferre the TS or RT. Next one will be 3/4" (my preference). The extra mass (thickness) I don't believe has really served much purpose or added much in any way to the sled.

The insert actually has worked out very nicely. I can swap out, or just replace as needed. It takes very little to make a blank and install. Thickness of insert is just a hair over 1/8". Seems sturdy enough but next one will go more towards 1/4". I had considered using rare earth magnets as a means to anchor the insert, thus making it easier to remove and install, BUT I just don't think they would anchor down the insert as well as what would be needed. The insert slot runs under the rear fence. Insert is installed and removed by sliding it under the rear fence, into position and then screwed down into place...

HTH...

Bill

Bill,

Always love the pictures of your sled and jigs. Great craftmanship!!! Would love to see a detail on the replaceable insert.

One note of your comment above. True, but just adding a persective to ponder:

"Your" pictured saw has a depth of cut of 3.25" with a 10" blade. With an 8" dado, that puts it at 2.25". Say you use 3/4" for the base... (I know that's pretty thick, but an extreme example.) That puts the depth of cut at 1.5". 75-80% of dado cuts are less than 3/8". Even if using a 6" dado with the above saw and sled, your depth of cut would be around 1/2".

Just a thought that it might not be that bad... as long a you know where those limits are. Most my sled bases are 3/8" to 1/2", depending on it's intended use.

For dado's, I built this one with a 1/2" base:
http://www.woodsmithshop.com/download/403/precisioncrosscutsled.pdf
 

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I'd just like to say that no matter the materials used to construct any jig, as long as the fundamentals of the intended purpose are followed they are all good!!!! I tend to make pretty jigs. Just cause, I like to do that. But before I do anything, I try to make sure that it will be a 'functional' jig and just not a wall hanger. Whether its a couple pieces of left over ply you have sitting around or digging from the scrap pile, there is no right or wrong when it comes to looks, just does it do what you want it to do, do it well and do it consistently. These are the things I look at the hardest. I have several sleds, most of which are just plywood. And they work great.
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Here is another cross cut sled you may want to consider. Airman you will find many different variations and this is due in part to what you intend to use it for. When I rebuild mine I will make it big enough to handle what I do most commonly.

Good luck with the build and post some pictures so we can see how you made out.
Thanks for the Sketchup files Dan, they are really helpful in understanding the design and build of the sled.
 

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Dan, sorry I dropped out of the conversation. Am working 2 weeks on 2 weeks off shift up in Northern Alberta Canada and our internet/3g service is crappy. I can't open the sled zip files but thanks anyway
 

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No worries my friend I know what it is like to work shift work.

I am sorry you can not open the files but perhaps we can trouble shoot why this is happening. A few question if I may:

They are compressed so you need something like winzip to uncompress them. You can download the program free off the net.

If you have winzip or some other program which allows you to open compressed files the next program you will need to open the files is Google SketchUp. It can also be downloaded free from the net. Once this is installed you will be able to view the files.

If all else fails I may be able to convert them to a PDF document and email them to you.

Let me know if any of my suggestions help.
 

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Thanks Dan the pdf file works great but now I feel somehow less than a man for not being able to open the zip file. It's kind of like when someone else opened the top of the jar that you tried so hard to but could'nt.
The plan for the sled looks great and I like the tenon jig plan as well.
Can't wait to get home to build one.
 

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TRN thanks for your help. This is what I whipped up the day I got home. It's a variation of a few plans, 24"x36"Baltic birch base, alder front and rear fence with a T track on the top. I installed 2 UHDE runners and i'ts even turned out accurate. Made a little stop and so I am in the sled cutting business.
 

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Your very welcome! and by the way nicely done. You will get many years out of that sled. Let me know how you like it after you have used it for a bit. i.e. any needed mods
 

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TRN thanks for your help. This is what I whipped up the day I got home. It's a variation of a few plans, 24"x36"Baltic birch base, alder front and rear fence with a T track on the top. I installed 2 UHDE runners and i'ts even turned out accurate. Made a little stop and so I am in the sled cutting business.
Hi Steve,

You be be amazed at how easy it makes work and you will wonder how you managed without it in the past.

If you do not have a shed full of tools, I would make this the first table saw jig in my shed.
 

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I keep seeing 'table saw sleds' no matter what magazine I look at plus here. I even copied a plan from the town libraries August '12 (I think) Fine Woodworking.

But with that said, don't know why I even need one though Norm used one as well as David Marks in building their projects.

Help is needed (that is, for me anyhow:help:)
 

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Dave, accuracy is the main reason people build a crosscut saw sled. The mitre guide that is included with "most" table saws is woefully inadequate. The sled isn't the answer for all cuts of course, but for straight crosscuts it's dead-on accurate when it's setup correctly. You can also build different sleds for dead-on angle cuts.
 

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Dave, accuracy is the main reason people build a crosscut saw sled. The mitre guide that is included with "most" table saws is woefully inadequate. The sled isn't the answer for all cuts of course, but for straight crosscuts it's dead-on accurate when it's setup correctly. You can also build different sleds for dead-on angle cuts.
Thanks Brian - kinda thought that's what they worked best for. I generally use my radial arm saw for anything up to 12" or so wide as it is a lot more accurate then the poor miter gauge that has been on my list for replacement for a long time
 

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worth the effort

Built mine just to get rid of that thing they call a sliding compound miter saw off my workbench.Takes to much room in my tiny shop and not nearly as accurate as the sled.
Tdog.
If it aint broke use a bigger hammer.
 
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