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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone use wax or another product on their table to make things slide easier? I'm asking about Formica not cast.
I made my own lift and plate aluminum isn't as slick and hard as anodized, so I was curious about that too. I was going to cover the lift plate with Formica that was contrasting colors to my table top...... now I'm probably going to leave it bare since it's working well as is.
 

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yes on the wax...
the more you buff it out the harder/slipperier it gets...'',
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Stick. That's what I needed.
I got that "broken image" thing again. I've seen that a lot here.
I am using the "mobile" view. I exited mobile view and the link works now.
 

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Hand buffing is too tiring to suit me, so I use a drill and buffing pad. cheap and Easier to get it slick. Past wax like carnuba. No additives that can ruin your finish.
 

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Hand buffing is too tiring to suit me, so I use a drill and buffing pad. cheap and Easier to get it slick. Past wax like carnuba. No additives that can ruin your finish.

an ROS w/ a wool bonnet - cake and pie...
elcheapo car buffer is easy peasy too...
either because wax is an on going process...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Ok, since I brought it up. https://www.routerforums.com/attach...ur-router-table-004-01-router-table-face-.jpg..

The lift mechanism has 12 bronze bushings in the section that holds the router. There are three of them in each of four corners. Those bushings are pressed inside brass tubing, so you can't actually see them.
Now to the question. That center platform with the bushings, rides up and down on 4, 1/2" threaded rods. Crappy image doesn't show the threads much.
I used a diamond Stone and an Arkansas stone to smooth the edges of the threads..... sort of polished the edges that ride against the bushings.
I'm wondering what you guys use for a dry lubricant. I'd like to spray the rods so less dust sticks to them. The fit is snug inside the bushings and the dust doesn't inhibit movement. The threads may have filled up, and no more can get in there anyway.
One lube better than another at repelling dust?
 

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One lube better than another at repelling dust?
in this application, dry lube..

I'm real partial to Triflow but most any dry lube will work well providing it's has Teflon/PFTE in it... [higher percentage by volume is more gooder]...
CRC, Tiolube, KG and DuPont each have several most excellent industrial spec DRY SOLID FILM lubricants..
Criteria - dries dry to the touch, high pressure load bearing, contains Teflon/PFTE, barrier forming, extreme temperature range, [usually -100 to +500F] isn't hygroscopic, does not collect dirt, not flammable in dry state, chemical resistant, does not contain silicone, has a long list of compatibles and is really very long lasting...

one thing about dry solid film lubricants is that when you apply them and you think that you didn't apply enough you have probably applied too much..
very, very little goes a loooooooooooooooong way...
Just wait until you do your saw's arbor mechanism w/ dry lube.. you and your saw will never be the same... You'll treat everything that moves in the shop in short order... Please thoroughly clean whatever before lubing..
It's a great release agent too...

Dry Film Lubricants are high performance coatings made up of very fine particles of lubricating agents blended with binders and other special additives. Once cured, these lubricating agents bond to the part surface as a solid film which reduces galling, seizing and fretting and protects against corrosion. Through the combination of these properties, dry film lubricants greatly improve the wear life of coated parts.

Dry film/solid film lubricants allow for operating pressures above the load-bearing capacity of normal greases and oils. They are also less prone to collecting soil particulates than greases and oils. In some applications, the coating is self-burnishing, leading to improved, rather than decreased, performance over time. Some blends of dry film/solid film lubricants are also temperature and chemical resistant allowing for their use in harsh environments such as jet engines where exposure to aviation fuel and extreme temperatures are the norm.

This is the type of lubricant you want to use if you have a CNC.
AVOID using anything with silicone in it, because it seems to eventually get on everything including your project and you will have all kinds of finishing problems.
 
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