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Hi Forum, I have a Craftsman model 113.299410 table saw and have never been happy with the rip fence alignment. I have gone through the manual to align the rails, fence, etc. but I still get up to 1/8" misalignment when I engage the locking mechanism. I have also tried overtensioning and undertensioning the locking mechanism with no better results.

I understand that the Biesemeyer fences lock down accurately each and every time. With my stock fence on the Craftsman I go through a ritual before each rip cut measuring the desired cut from fence to blade, then measure from fence over to the far miter slot. I then transfer the fence to miter distance on the front and back of the fence, recheck the blade to fence width and then lock down the fence. If I don't do this and just lock the fence down without setting it parallel with the blade I will get a binding at some point during the cut.

Any experience with this? The aftermarket fences sound great, but, do they really make a big difference?

Thanks,
Tim
 

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Hi Forum, I have a Craftsman model 113.299410 table saw and have never been happy with the rip fence alignment. I have gone through the manual to align the rails, fence, etc. but I still get up to 1/8" misalignment when I engage the locking mechanism. I have also tried overtensioning and undertensioning the locking mechanism with no better results.

I understand that the Biesemeyer fences lock down accurately each and every time. With my stock fence on the Craftsman I go through a ritual before each rip cut measuring the desired cut from fence to blade, then measure from fence over to the far miter slot. I then transfer the fence to miter distance on the front and back of the fence, recheck the blade to fence width and then lock down the fence. If I don't do this and just lock the fence down without setting it parallel with the blade I will get a binding at some point during the cut.

Any experience with this? The aftermarket fences sound great, but, do they really make a big difference?

Thanks,
Tim
Yes they are, and they are spendy also.

Your fence locks both front and rear. It should be solid one adjusted.

A few questions.
Is your blade parallel to your miter slots?

When you move your fence to a miter slot and push the front of the fence rearward (unlocked), is the fence parallel with the miter slot?

If so, holding the fence rearward, if you then lock the fence, does the fence move from parallel or stay?

If it moves, to the left or right?
 

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Yes they do!
After fighting a Jet Lock fence on a 30yr old Rockwell contractor saw for far too long, I bought another saw "used" with a Biesmeyer fence.
That fence is really nice and accurate. I can set it to .001" using a dial indicator.
The Delta T2 fence has got many good reports, and for around $150.
I am going to try one of those on my contractors saw. It is like the Biesmeyer, but not so monster heavy.
There are other good fences also. Others would know I am sure.

Don
 

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Yes they do!
After fighting a Jet Lock fence on a 30yr old Rockwell contractor saw for far too long, I bought another saw "used" with a Biesmeyer fence.
That fence is really nice and accurate. I can set it to .001" using a dial indicator.
The Delta T2 fence has got many good reports, and for around $150.
I am going to try one of those on my contractors saw. It is like the Biesmeyer, but not so monster heavy.
There are other good fences also. Others would know I am sure.

Don
Hey, Don; my original equipment Delta fence is very secure when it locks down, but it does have an annoying quirk of moving slightly from where I think it's lined up to where it actually ends up as I latch it down. It's easy enough to readjust but I don't think I should have to. I must say that thankfully it doesn't have to be checked front and rear after securing it; it self aligns perfectly...just not exactly where I want it. (It's on a Delta Contractor saw)
Does the T2 lock down precisely where you set it?
 

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Tim,

The first question that needs to be answered is, is your blade set parallel to the mitre slot? Once that is accomplished then the fence gets adjusted to the mitre slot as well. Both are setup using a dial indicator. There are several other methods not as accurate, to perform this setup.
 

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Tim,

The first question that needs to be answered is, is your blade set parallel to the mitre slot? Once that is accomplished then the fence gets adjusted to the mitre slot as well. Both are setup using a dial indicator. There are several other methods not as accurate, to perform this setup.
I agree with Joe as I said in post 2.

I have a 3/4" x 3/4" cold rolled bar that I put in my miters that I use to quick-check and to adjust my fence.
 

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Doug
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Tim,

The first thing, a belated welcome to the forum. Does the fence always have the same sort of error? (is it always closer to the blade on the back of the fence, etc) Is the error roughly the same size 20" from the blade as it is 1" from the blade?

My old ryobi had sliding fence rails, and sometimes they would not be parallell to each other. This would cause the fence to not align properly.
 

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"do they really make a big difference?" Yes but at what cost? Is your saw worth putting a fence on that cost more than the saw? It is a pain to set up your fence each time by measuring it but it's free.
 

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Hi Tim.
Yes, to all the above. Make sure the blade is aligned first, then find yourself another fence. I have a 113.298750 (with the cast iron wings) that I really like. Two mods: a linked belt to greatly reduce vibration, and a Vega fence originally made for a Powermatic saw, that I got from Craigslist for $50. The Vega fence clamps to the front tube (2" Stainless) with a nice wide stance, so it doesn't wobble at all. The other neat thing about the Vega is that it is real easy to just lift off (kinda lumpy at about 15 lbs). Just lift the locking lever, and pull straight up. Makes change-overs to cross cutting quick and easy. I just hang it on the wall behind the side of the saw. Once you get this sorted out I'm sure you will be happy with the saw. Tim in TX
 

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Looking at the diagram from mike, mine (a Skil 3400) looks very similar to the OP's fence, and it is also too easy to clamp down askew of the blade. It can be clamped up to 1/8" off front to back. I have verified that the blade is parallel to the miter slots.

Maybe I need to adjust the clamping mechanism at the back end to decrease the play when it is not clamped down.
 

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It seems to me, fences that clamp at the rear as well as the front, are just harder to work with.
I dont have the Delta T2 yet, Iam thinking of going with one or, one of the Vega models.
The Jet Lock on my 1983 Rockwell contractors saw is, perhaps made on a Monday after a party. Its just terrible.

It appears it takes a little drilling to adapt the T2 to a Craftsman saw.
Retrofitting A Delta T2 Fence to a Craftsman Table Saw
 

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I am sure I do it totally wrong. I have a HF bench saw; I have a piece of 2X4 screwed to the fence, to lengthen it. To set the fence for a 2" cut I place a measured 2" wide block between the blade and the fence, clamp down; 6" cut, it's a 6" wide piece; and so on. And it works, quite well in fact.

This does NOT mean I recommend this method for other people; see my sig.
 

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Theo; if you do a lot of the same width cuts, over time that's a really efficient technique. Works especially well for the casework shop; same width gables all the time.
 

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Chris-

Maybe. Seems to me that if it had tighter clearances, where the back held the front snug against the front fence, that when you move it, it would stay somewhat square without having to hold it against the fence guide rail. But the question would be if you did that, would the rear lock right... The rear still needs to be just loose enough to over-lock the lever.

Don-

Otis has a front and rear locking fence on his Hitachi and just raves about it. When I was building my Bies clone fence and rails. I looked into incorporating a rear lock, then thought that it was so overbuilt overkill already, that it wasn't going to move or flex.

What I did do with the one I built... As Biesemeyer clone, it holds to the inside of the rail and locks on the front side. On the traditional Bies, if you pull towards you (unlocked) it would be square until locked square. What I did on my own built clone was to make an extra guide in front with springs and gliders, so that it stays square while you move the fence. It also has 2 other adjustment that I added for perpendicular to the table and parallel to the table (besides just being square).

Questions-

Does it consistently move to the same direction? If so, then adjust it so that it ends up square (preloaded).

If it is locked down and the far end moves or flexes, check all the bolts.

Look at "how" it locks. See if it has pulling the squared part towards you to be square or if it pushes rearwards to be square against the fence rail.

By the parts diagram, it looks as if you push the front T-Square against the rail and it should be square (or at home against the fence rail). Then the level pulls from the rear of the table to sandwich the front T against the rail while the rear is the other side of that.

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I have my own site saw that I had to lock down 2 handed, until I made a mod (down below).

If you want to mod it... If you make 2 small brackets to go off each end of the T-Square (with a slot to adjust). Drill a hole for each to mount. The bracket would keep the T-square snug against the rail while you move and when locked. Picture cross-sectionally. The T-Square contacts the fence in fron and on top. The brackets would contact from the rear of the fence. On the inside edge of the bracket that contacts the fence, put on a small piece of UltraHigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMW-PE) tape, so it slides good.

On the far side (rear), put a piece of UltraHigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMW-PE) tape on the underside of the rear of the fence for it to side nice. I wouldn't put this tape on the T-Square, as I think on that saw it would slide too well... With the locking mechanism on that, I think maybe put that slick stuff on the T-Square and the fence might not hold well enough.

That is, if you what to keep the fence and make it work... It's may be better, but it's only going to as good as it's underlying foundation. I think I made my cabinet saw's fence system for $10. But I had all the steal. I also have a lot of metal working tools and welders.

Biesemeyer, Vega, Jet Unifence, Incra TS-LS. Or clones thereof. Buy Used. Or look at their designs and build your own. Or buy a "dead" saw cheap, with the intention of salvaging the fence system. As you posted, what you have now is not working for you right?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Though I have never aligned using a dial indicator I do have my blade parallel with the miter slot and my rip fence rails are as near to perfect alignment (horizontally) to the table top as is possible. I recently aligned everything after discovering the blade was off. I even had to rebuild my cut-off sled as it was well off from cutting square after I aligned the blade with the miter slot.

I've followed the manual several times to adjust the tension on the locking mech on the fence properly and still the fence does not align parallel with the blade unless I do my measurements before and then lock it down. It always stays when I lock it down, it is just I have to physically square it up before doing so. Maybe I am expecting too much, or, my procedure setting the fence into position is faulty. I just think that when I grab the fence in the center, move it into position, measure my cut width and lock it down the front and back should be parallel with the blade/miter every time. What I get is the cut entering the blade is correct and then at exit binds between the blade and fence causing problems (kickback or high tension to continue through cut).

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just curious guys... this Craftsman has a fence that looks like a quality design when I assembled the table. However, the fence sits on an aluminum front rail (does not ride on rails, just sits on them). Do the Vega, Bies., Delta fences actually hug the rail on the front when not locked down? Can these fences be easily lifted from the rail or do the hug the rail and you have to run it all the way to the end to remove? Sorry, I have never really looked over one of these fences. This Craftsman design, while looking originally like it was well designed can rock and roll very easily as it slides along on top of the rail.

Tim
 

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I own a Vega and I love it. I bought it for the micro adjust. It is well engineered and bolted right up to my Crafstman contractor TS. It is designed to support an extended table. I easily made a RT to fill the hole. It was worth the costs.
 
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