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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just finished a tall table saw fence jig.

Face is a combination of decent 3/4 ply with a 3/4 MDF face. Pictures tell most of the story. There is a cross piece the width of the fence plus the thickness of the 3/4 ply. The piece behind the fence is also 3/4 ply, but also has 3 5/16 ths T nuts on the inside edge with some stainless slotted bolts with knurled knobs on the end. The bolts pull the fence flush with the blade side of the fence. I put two sheets of wax paper between the fence and back piece during assembly to allow a little room for expansion and contraction. The MDF keeps the face flat. The braces on the top are glued in place. I might yet glue the back piece in place, but just screws for now.

Had to take a plane to the top of the cross pieces to get it perfectly flat and 90 degrees to the face so the braces fit exactly. Back stop is secured with 7, 2-inch screws down through the top. Turned out pretty well, now I can get started on the 16 drawers I need. Last picture was supposed to be vertical, but shows the recess and T nut and the knurled knob on the bold--Finger tight is all that's needed.

During the project I discovered I'd knocked my band saw table out of perpendicular to the blade and that my trusty Bosch sliding miter was 89, not 90 degrees. Thank the woodworking deities for Wixey digital angle gauges.

I had a couple of WoodRiver planes that didn't seem to work after I cleaned them up and put them together. Discovered on this project that I didn't put the blade up down fork into the slotted raise and lowering adjuster nut--oops. Man, are those planes sweet! A #4 and #6 so far.
 

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Tom--

Very good job! Well built. Very well thought out.

Question-- So the bottom edges of your fence extension, on each side of your fence surround (face and tail)... that surface uses the table to find perpendicular from the table surface? Or the face of your fence?

Reason I asked that question, is that on tall fence jigs and raised panel type jigs, that is where that starts to become a factor. Otherwise, usually not even a concern or thought. Normal TS fences have adjustments for perpendicular from the rails for parallel to the blade, but most are lacking in adjustment for face being perpendicular to the table surface. Remember the fence system I built for my Rockwell? I made some adjustments on that system for those kinds of adjustments.

I have an idea on making that adjustable on your jig, if you were interested...
 

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excellent execution....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi,

The fence is referenced from the table and from the fence, which is dead on 90. I used a 90 degree engineers square and again with a draftman's triangle with a 90 degree angle. When you cinch up the three bolts on the back, it pulls the face square to the table, Checked it many times as I put this together. The only problem came with the piece that spans the fence, it was not quite as flat as I wished, so I added two strips of iron on shelf edging, on on top of the other to make it ride level, then planed the top so the angle was an exact 90. When I glued the five braces in place, I figured they would prevent any further movement of the board. I can't easily get Baltic Birch, which is why I glued up the front with two layers, one the best, flattest sheet of Maple surfaced ply from Home Depot, and a 3/4 piece of MDF. I connected the two before glueup after making an absolutely straight cut on each, then clamped them in perfect alignment on that edge, drilled two holes and dropped finish nails in to hold alignment while clamping. Glued them very carefully and pressed them together, with the two finish nails holding alignment as I clamped them together (10 clamps). Planed off the dried squeeze out, then recut on the table saw keeping the known perfect edge against the fence. That gave me a great face to work with.

I clamped the face to the fence (that's when I checked the vertical), then laid the cross piece on the fence and with the cross piece clamped in place, pre drilled and counter sunk screws to hold them together. Glued it up and re inserted the screws to hold it tight while the glue dried. When I tried to place the braces on top, I notice it was not really flat, so added the two iron on strips so it would track square on top of the fence, and then planed the top til it was a perfect 90 to the back of the fence. The high fence was clamped to the fence the whole time.

The T nuts idea came after sleeping on what to use to secure the thing properly. Decided to use 5/16th bolts but couldn't find a nice, big knob in that size locally so settled for the knurled bolts, which I can tightne sufficiently to pull the fence tight and so it doesn't move.

I have to make 16 drawers now and I figured this jig would really improve my chances of making drawer sides just right.

In the garage, I have a Euro style table with folding legs made with great Baltic Birch, and I'm thinking I might use it to make a couple of bolt ons for this jig. One would be very tall, maybe 15-18 inches and another tall spline cutting jig for art frames, boxes and small drawers. Have some nice Birch that needs squaring up that will make for a great spline jig. My wife is turning into a pretty good artist so frame making is in my future.

I do tend to write long, but since you asked...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Tom--

Very good job! Well built. Very well thought out.

Question-- So the bottom edges of your fence extension, on each side of your fence surround (face and tail)... that surface uses the table to find perpendicular from the table surface? Or the face of your fence?

Reason I asked that question, is that on tall fence jigs and raised panel type jigs, that is where that starts to become a factor. Otherwise, usually not even a concern or thought. Normal TS fences have adjustments for perpendicular from the rails for parallel to the blade, but most are lacking in adjustment for face being perpendicular to the table surface. Remember the fence system I built for my Rockwell? I made some adjustments on that system for those kinds of adjustments.

I have an idea on making that adjustable on your jig, if you were interested...
I would love to have your suggestion. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
excellent execution....
Thanks Stick. I often think about you when doing something like this, "what would Stick do here?" I'd love to share a couple of beers with you some time, not to pick your brain, but I always enjoy being around someone who is masterful in what they do.

You remind me a little of a guy named Byron who was my friend in theater when I was a kid. He designed and made sets and that's where I started enjoying woodworking. He taught set design and tech theater in L.A. for decades, owned an engineering company that made permanent installations in Disney and other parks, and now at 70 runs a motion picture production services company.

He was also a bit tacitern.
 

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Thanks Stick. I often think about you when doing something like this, "what would Stick do here?" I'd love to share a couple of beers with you some time, not to pick your brain, but I always enjoy being around someone who is masterful in what they do.

You remind me a little of a guy named Byron who was my friend in theater when I was a kid. He designed and made sets and that's where I started enjoying woodworking. He taught set design and tech theater in L.A. for decades, owned an engineering company that made permanent installations in Disney and other parks, and now at 70 runs a motion picture production services company.

He was also a bit taciturn.
thanks for the vote of confidence but I didn't do anything... that was all you...

make mine coffee.. you can have my beer and I'll be the DD...

and I'm not a man of few words... by a long shot...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Coffee it is. Isn't that you did anything, it is the setting of a high standard. What state are you in?
 

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Looks great man. How long did it take to finish?
About 3 hours, plus a couple of trips to HD. The key was to keep it square to the table all the way through. The Wixey got a workout keeping the blade and the fence at a perfect 90. The cross piece turned out a little off on top so I used some iron on shelf facing underr and hand planed the top till it was square (for the reinforcement on the top.

The odd spaces on the top hold a measuring tape, Wixey and a magnetic light which is handy.
 
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