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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a project I had in mind for a long time. It took me a long time to figure out how I was going to do the process. Keep in mind I am no perfectionist! We wanted a clock that we can see while watching TV, so we don't have to check the TV guide to know what time we have left.
I was given the Black Walnut Mill Ends used for this clock. The clock works came from Lee Valley Tools and the rest came from my own imagination. I will try to relate the process without getting too windy; attaching related photos.
I sized the blanks with a thickness planer first and filled one knothole in case the piece was included. Next the pieces had to be cut and joined, using my biscuit joiner. After drying time for the glue, I laid out the clock face and made a pattern to decorate the body of the clock. That part was the most work of the entire project. I had to rework the pattern for the carvings three times, to get something I could enjoy viewing regularly. Next job was to cut the shape of the clock body with the band saw, followed by some sanding to clean up the shape of the body.
I used a pin arm attachment to carve the pattern around the clock face. Carving out excess waste with a 1/4" spiral bit took two passes to get the depth required. Edges were rounded off with a plunge 1/4" beading bit/ 1/2" shank; followed by a lot of fiddly finger sanding. Cutting out the space for the clock motor in the back was accomplished with a 1/4" spiral bit first, for a thin cover. The deeper cavity for the motor was cut out with a 1/2" forstner bit on the drill press.
The finish is Teak Oil; 3 coats; more sanding between coats.
Total dimensions: 23" long by 11" high and 2" thick. The feet are 3" wide with felt pads to avoid any scratches on the mantle. Assembling the clock face and hands was a chore in itself for an old guy that is half blind. :nerd::laugh2:
More photos available if needed.
 

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Registered
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Tambour Clock Photos

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Mike
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Reg that is really a nice clock. That is also a good example of pin routing. Nice job. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Reg, What a beautiful piece of art with function! I was wondering how when using a pin router, do you plunge in the middle of a board to get started carving something like this? I understand the concept of how it is guided by the pin, but wondered how you get started safely? Also does teak oil have varnish or something besides oil?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Plunge Router

(gmercer 48083) Reg, What a beautiful piece of art with function! I was wondering how when using a pin router, do you plunge in the middle of a board to get started carving something like this? I understand the concept of how it is guided by the pin, but wondered how you get started safely? Also does teak oil have varnish or something besides oil?
The Router in my Veritas table is a Triton TRA001. There is a lift lever attached with a chain and foot peddle for delicate situations; however I disconnected it for this application, since it would require using my foot for a long period of time. I had no trouble lifting the pin (on a spring) and moving the walnut block over the router bit with the router running. Lowering the work piece down onto the blade slowly and safely, since your fingers are no where close to blades. I always use the MUSCLECHUCK on my Triton and never had a bit work loose yet. The block of Walnut is quite heavy too, so lowering the work piece slowly allows the blade to gradually engage the work piece safely.No harm;no fowl; all fingers accounted for without injury!
Teak oil is just an oil finish that dries slowly to a hard finish. Multi coats, sanded between coats, gives me the gloss finish I love on the black Walnut. I am sure there is no varnish in it at all. Three coats of Teak oil likely takes 5 days to dry completely. Fewer coats may give you a more subdued gloss. However, sanding and tack cloth use will greatly reduce dust nibs in your finish.
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Nicely done, Reg, and the photos showing the work in progress are great!
 
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