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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Years ago I made a number of hand held oval mirrors and gave them for Christmas presents. To my surprise, I've had comments that after almost 40 years, some of the recipients have told me that they still use the mirror on a daily basis and are still enjoying it. My wife suggested I make some more but for the life of me, I can't figure out how to make a template for cutting the inlet to hold the mirrors. A round one, yes, but not an oval. Is there a method that I could use by routing around the oval mirror and somehow using that and a trimmer cutter to make a template while also taking into consideration the other half of the diameter of the router base? I didn't explain that very well, but want I want to end up with is an oval template that the router will set inside of with a half inch diameter cutter to produce a routed space in the wood the mirror will drop in. What I did years ago was trace the mirror on the wood and carefully "stay within the lines". It was never perfect and I think there should be a way to do it. Please feel free to ask for clarification and I'll do my best to make my problem more understandable. Thank you, Don
 

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Hello Don !
Welcome here!

About routing Ovals, Don't know exactly what you mean,
but maybe ellipse would do the job.

There are some costly accessories able to guide a router fot elliptic routing.
IMHO it's quite possible to draw an ellipse using the string and pins technique.
And then, jig saw, sandpaper and you got a template to use with a router and
a guide bush.
Using a large guide bush and two different diameters cutters, you can get the recess
for the mirror.
you will need also an other template for routing external shape.
All could be made hand held routing .

Regards
Gérard
 

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Hi Don.

This post give you an idea of how to use a template to route an elliptical shape.

http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fixtures/39608-no-snow-try-skiing.html

Also you could use an "inlay kit" to make a template to route an oval cutout around the mirror.

MLCS 9177 Brass Router Inlay Kit with Router Bit - Amazon.com

Inlay With A Router - YouTube


In an episode of the Router Workshop, Bob and Rick used the inlay kit to set a round tile into the top of a wooden box.

Episode #801 - China Inlay Chest
 

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Hi Don. A bit of clarification from you, please? Potentially, you would be looking at three ovals, nested one inside the other:
1. the outside of the mirror frame, which I presume is an oval with a handle bit at one narrow end?
2. The inside of the mirror frame, i.e. the cutout in which the reflection in the mirror is seen. It sounds like you want this to be half an inch smaller than the mirror all round?
3. The rebate on the reverse side of the frame, into which the mirror drops.
Are you planning on using the router for all three?
 

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Hi Don.

I found this link on the routerworkshop.com site.

This shows how to make your template to make the insert .

Router Workshop: reverse inlay
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Clarification, I hope

Hi Don. A bit of clarification from you, please? Potentially, you would be looking at three ovals, nested one inside the other:
1. the outside of the mirror frame, which I presume is an oval with a handle bit at one narrow end?
2. The inside of the mirror frame, i.e. the cutout in which the reflection in the mirror is seen. It sounds like you want this to be half an inch smaller than the mirror all round?
3. The rebate on the reverse side of the frame, into which the mirror drops.
Are you planning on using the router for all three?
Thanks to all for your replies, they helped. What I want to do is cut a rebate to inlay the oval mirror which may be of various sizes. I was hoping to find a simple method to make a template by somehow using the mirror (or wooden pattern) as a guide. The pin guide appears that it would work best but I'm open to all ideas. Thank you again.
 

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Hi Don. If I understand you correctly, you will be inlaying the mirror on the face side of your workpiece, not inserting it into the back, as in a picture frame.
If that is the case, Jame's link is as good as it gets. You will not need an overarm pin. In fact, you can probably get away without template guides, if you use the appropriate combination of bushings on the router bit.
 

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Thanks to all for your replies, they helped. What I want to do is cut a rebate to inlay the oval mirror which may be of various sizes. I was hoping to find a simple method to make a template by somehow using the mirror (or wooden pattern) as a guide. The pin guide appears that it would work best but I'm open to all ideas. Thank you again.
Hi Don - You can make the template from the mirror using a bit/bushing combination and then make the relief from the template the same way. The trick is figuring the math and having the bits and bushings needed.
The female template will come out larger than the original by the diameter of the bit plus the offset between the bit and bushing. Offset is figured by bushing diameter minus bit diameter diameter divided by 2. ie; A 3/8" bushing and a 1/4" bit will have an offset of 1/16". A template made with that combination will be 5/16" larger than the original, in all directions from the center.
Now, to get back to the original size, you need a bit bushing combination equal to a 5/16" offset which is a total difference between the bit and bushing diameters of 5/8". A 1" bushing and a 3/8" bit would accomplish that in this example.
Hope that helped.. I get kinda dizzy sometimes doin this. :blink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks again. I picked up an inlay kit - basically a guide, bushing and bit, and as soon as I get finished with a current project I'm going to try it. I wasn't aware of all the guide/bushing combinations available which tells me I'm not the first to go through this. Thanks for pointing them out and to John for explaining how they are used. Don
 
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