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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am using guide bushings on my Ryobi router with a straight bit and not a flush trim bit. I find that the thickness of wood I can do is 0.75 inches since the cutting length on my router bits are 0.75 inches. Even at 1/8 inch per pass the max material thickness I can route is 3/4 inches. If I try to increase it then the amount of router bit in the collet will be lesser and can cause instability. Ideal I wanted to use template routing on thicker workpieces like a 2x6 for chair legs etc. How do I get around this limitation?

Also can someone share some links to how I can use template guide bushings to create curved chain legs or profiles?

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A router bit is ideally designed to cut to a depth of 1/2 of the diameter of the bit. That means that a 1/4" bit should cut 1/8" passes, which equals eight passes per inch of depth. Your bit that has two inches of blade width means the END of the bit can be machined down many times to give you a new blade edge at the TIP.

If you want to hog through a nice oak 2x6 in one pass with a two inch two-flute bit made out of Unobtanium, you are better off using a bandsaw to achieve the basic shape. Then route the corners with fillet bits, sand and shape accordingly.

Now, if you can afford a three-phase wood gobbling monster that CAN pass through a 2x6 plank of REAL WOOD in a single pass REPEATEDLY, then go for it. Those machines are out of MY budget!

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A router bit is ideally designed to cut to a depth of 1/2 of the diameter of the bit. That means that a 1/4" bit should cut 1/8" passes, which equals eight passes per inch of depth. Your bit that has two inches of blade width means the END of the bit can be machined down many times to give you a new blade edge at the TIP.

If you want to hog through a nice oak 2x6 in one pass with a two inch two-flute bit made out of Unobtanium, you are better off using a bandsaw to achieve the basic shape. Then route the corners with fillet bits, sand and shape accordingly.

Now, if you can afford a three-phase wood gobbling monster that CAN pass through a 2x6 plank of REAL WOOD in a single pass REPEATEDLY, then go for it. Those machines are out of MY budget!

Joe
No that's not the point I was making. Even if I do 1/8 inch passes the max the bit will go is 3/4 inches before I hit the router plate at max extension. I am asking what can be done to go lower and be able to cut through 1.5 inch thick material.

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I am using guide bushings on my Ryobi router with a straight bit and not a flush trim bit. I find that the thickness of wood I can do is 0.75 inches since the cutting length on my router bits are 0.75 inches. Even at 1/8 inch per pass the max material thickness I can route is 3/4 inches. If I try to increase it then the amount of router bit in the collet will be lesser and can cause instability. Ideal I wanted to use template routing on thicker workpieces like a 2x6 for chair legs etc. How do I get around this limitation?

Also can someone share some links to how I can use template guide bushings to create curved chain legs or profiles?

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You can purchase a longer bit. I took a quick look at the MLCS catalog and they have a straight bit with a .5" shank that is 1.25" long. I'm just a hobby woodworker and don't have a lot of router experience but it seems like lot of material you trying to remove. I think I get a longer bit and try doing it in a couple of passes. I'm sure someone with have a better plan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You can purchase a longer bit. I took a quick look at the MLCS catalog and they have a straight bit with a .5" shank that is 1.25" long. I'm just a hobby woodworker and don't have a lot of router experience but it seems like lot of material you trying to remove. I think I get a longer bit and try doing it in a couple of passes. I'm sure someone with have a better plan.
Again I am not saying I won't do multiple passes. But multiple passes won't do anything if my router bit is not long enough to get through 1.5 inch stock.

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I've pattern flush trimmed 1.5" thick hardwood for table legs in the past. That was using a bottom bearing 1.625" cutter spiral flush trim bit in a router table. Before flush trimming I band sawed the legs within 1/16" or so of the final surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've pattern flush trimmed 1.5" thick hardwood for table legs in the past. That was using a bottom bearing 1.625" cutter spiral flush trim bit in a router table. Before flush trimming I band sawed the legs within 1/16" or so of the final surface.
The straight bit I have has a 1 inch blade surface and can't do this.

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The straight bit I have has a 1 inch blade surface and can't do this.
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When that happens to me I invest in a longer bit. Consider it an investment for current and future projects. With simple straight bits I used a template bushing plate insert and make templates that are smaller than the finish part by the difference between the router bit and the bushing diameters. Long straight bits are usually less expensive than long pattern bits. Always with a 1/2" shank.

This is my routable top: Veritas Tools - Router Tables and Accessories - Router Table Top
Unfortunately no longer available.
4D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When that happens to me I invest in a longer bit. Consider it an investment for current and future projects. With simple straight bits I used a template bushing plate insert and make templates that are smaller than the finish part by the difference between the router bit and the bushing diameters. Long straight bits are usually less expensive than long pattern bits. Always with a 1/2" shank.

This is my routable top: Veritas Tools - Router Tables and Accessories - Router Table Top
Unfortunately no longer available.
4D
Can I use a collect extension? I believe mine is a 1/4 inch shank.

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Why not just buy a set of 4 "pattern router bits". Longest one has 38mm cutting edge. You may still use guide bushings with them but optional since they have bearings.
Try the cheap set first then buy the expensive set.
View attachment 403996
Yes I thought about this but wouldn't this mean I would need to throw away the guide bushings since they would not be necessary with these?

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Yes I thought about this but wouldn't this mean I would need to throw away the guide bushings since they would not be necessary with these?

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Don't throw away any of your guide bushings.
For example, the famous European "Kitchen-Worktop jig" requires a 30mm OD guide bush and a 1/2" straight bit.
So you can use these with a 30mm OD guide bushing for that.

These pattern bits are also only available in 3/8" and 1/2" diameters. So when doing detailed engravings or in-lays with fine 1/8" or 1/16" bits, you will still need the smaller sized guide bushings.
 

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Can you remove the guide bushing and use a longer bearing guided flush trim cutter (pattern bits) and use the edge you have cut so far to run the bearing against?
 

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Keep them for the next project? I use guide bushings for most of my projects...


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Natural material

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Automotive tire Wood Rim Saw Motor vehicle
 
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Can you help me understand how you use the guide bushings and which scenario? Do you use straight bits?

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Guide bushes are used with templates and jigs. Although commonly used with straight bits, guide-bushes are used with dove-tail bits, slot cutters, keyhole-cutters, V-bits, even plunge-type profile bits etc. all with the appropriate jigs.

On router tables (router mounted upside down) it is more convenient to use bits with bearings at the end rather than guide bushings so that you can see the template better when it is on top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Guide bushes are used with templates and jigs. Although commonly used with straight bits, guide-bushes are used with dove-tail bits, slot cutters, keyhole-cutters, V-bits, even plunge-type profile bits etc. all with the appropriate jigs.

On router tables (router mounted upside down) it is more convenient to use bits with bearings at the end rather than guide bushings so that you can see the template better when it is on top.
Yes I understood that but am wondering when you would have a use for guide bushes if you invest in a flush trim pattern bit. Wouldn't it make the guide bushings unnecessary?

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