Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This thread is to demonstrate how I make templates. I normally use 9mm MDF which is close to 3/8" and is easy to work with, low in cost and does not warp like wood. I'll start with the most simple form of template, the circle, for which I use a circle routing jig, which can be as simple as the easily made one shown here, or the more versatile one that that I use for all my circle routing.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Murtu01

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
This zip file shows the making of a coin tray including the making of a template for routing a round opening. Before we can make the template it's necessary to know three things, the diameter of the finished hole/opening, the diameter of the template guide that we intend to use and lastly, the diameter of the chosen bit. If the finished hole/opening is to be 5", the template guide 1.5" and the bit 0.5" then, guide diameter minus the bit diameter plus diameter of the finished hole/opening equals the size of hole in the template. Thus for the 5" finished size we have: 1.5" - 0.5" + 5" = 6" hole in the template.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Next we produce a template for routing a square/rectangular hole/opening, the calculation is the same as above, diameter of the template guide minus diameter of the bit plus the size of the finished hole/opening. I keep repeating the simple formula so that it becomes second nature to you, making charts unnecessary. Take a look at shot #19 in the coin tray zip file, notice that the bit has been changed to a 3/8", this is because we want the the wall thickness to be 3/16" and this is where we use the word "offset", which is the distance from the edge of the template guide and the cutting edge of the bit, so, to calculate the offset, it's similar to what we have discussed and is: template guide diameter minus diameter of the bit divided by two. For the coin tray it was 1 1/8" - 3/8" ÷ 2 = 3/16", simple!
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Finally we'll become more adventurous and make a copy of a small French balloon clock. This zip file includes the design and making of the templates using the techniques that you have just learned.
For most of my small projects I make templates 300mm x 400mm which is close to 12" x 15" and these fit into a template holder which is a tray made from 2" x 1" into which I place a jig which holds the workpiece securely. For the clock I chose a cam jig for securing the workpiece but I often simply pin a piece of scrap MDF or wood on each side as shown. The main reason that I use 300mm x 400mm templates is that I can buy MDF 300mm wide which makes it far easier to get home than a large sheet which then has to be manoeuvred onto the saw table.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,181 Posts
You make a fine teacher Harry. I'm sure that those with less experience will benefit immensely from your efforts. In fact, you've taught me a few things along the way.

Thankyou,

Charley
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thank you guys, like many members, I'm happy to share what I have.
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
18,737 Posts
Another great tutorial.

Thanks Harry.

You can certainly show us young'uns a thing or two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Top quality tutorial as usual Harry, they are all greatly appreciated. :thank_you2:

Regards

Harold
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks James and Harold, the best appreciation is always when beginners show not only what they've achieved but HOW they achieved it, complete with some photographs.

Harold, I know this is a long shot but I recently lost a Hungarian friend of 44 years standing whose name was Jacomo (Jimmy) Pal, a television technician like myself married to Rosika. Any relation? I probably wouldn't have asked except that you look Hungarian.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Hi harry, :no: not hungarian:haha: just a true blue oz caught in the headlights of an on coming car. :eek:


Regards

Harold
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Thanks Harry.
Very useful and helpful,interesting to see how you figure it out.
I´ve learnt a lot.
Best regards,Sergio.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Thanks again guys, don't forget, any questions will be answered and NO QUESTION is considered stupid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
It is great to have folks like you to show us the way with a glimpse at your work and experience. Thank you Harry for your postings!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
It really is my pleasure Jorge, being well into retirement I have time to pass on whatever knowledge and experience that I have acquired over a very long period and I attempt to do this in an easy to understand way, most of us agree that a picture is worth a thousand words. By the way, welcome to the forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Thanks Harry for these great write ups it is much appreciated, can you talk about the time you use to make sure all that your material is square, and what you do when it is not? I have lately found myself leaving out this important step and continue to fight this oversight till the end of the project.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for your nice comments Mark. There are members far more experienced than me who can guide you on the squareness problem. So far as I'm personally concerned, I rely on my accurately set-up radial arm saw, and have done for so many years that I really can't remember what life was like without the RAS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I was under the same umbrella and then I decided to recycle some wood from an old kitchen, I was chasing squaring problems all day, I finally took the extra time to plane and joiner each piece, it sounds like a lot of work and I am sure there is probably some wasted steps is the reason I asked. Are you still in Television, I used to work for a hardware vendor for Sony, Ikegami, Panasonic for commercial stations here in the states. Having a hot summer down here in Dallas, Tx this year, nothing like you Ozzies get but enough to make it miserable outside most of the time. Thanks again for organizing this wonderful forum. Cheers
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top