Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all. I hope that I am posting in the appropriate section. I was very impressed by the warm welcome that I received recently and was encouraged to ask questions if necessary. Well, I am here to ask.

I posted a photo in the "New Member Introductions" sub-forum of an acoustic panel that I wish to construct. I also mentioned that I purchased a Craftsman router thinking that it would be the right tool for the job.

For the most part the panels will measure 48" x 24" x 3" or 6" deep.

Now this is my thinking:

I thought that I would perhaps create a template based on the oval cutout seen on the 24" panel (top + bottom of panel) I could then use said template to make the slats on the side planks which are 48" in length.

I do not know how I am going to create this template (wood / plexiglass). And. if I did, how would I fasten it to the individual panels so that I might use my router to make the clean / straight cutouts. Would I clamp it down flat against the planks to be cut? I could also choose to go with the other option where circular holes were made in the planks but then I suppose that I would need a drill press to do this properly. Which I do not possess. I am also not that fond of the look. In the event that I keep the wood exposed.

I would also like to know what bit I would use if the router is what I end up using. I will attach a photo here as well.

I hope that I am making some sense! I really appreciate all the help that I can get. Peter
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
drill guide for the round holes...
do not cut the slots w/ the router w/o hogging out the material w/ a jigsaw 1st...
use the router w/ a trim bit to dress the slot's sides...
Freud Tools - Search Results for helix
make the template from any wood sheet goods ya have... can the pliglas plan..
do you have access to a table saw???



 
  • Like
Reactions: peterbata

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
drill guide for the round holes...

Actually, I had my heart set on the panel with the cutout slots.

do not cut the slots w/ the router w/o hogging out the material w/ a jigsaw 1st...
use the router w/ a trim bit to dress the slot's sides...

make the template from any wood sheet goods ya have... can the pliglas plan..
do you have access to a table saw???

By the way, who makes that drill guide?
Something just occurred to me, my son-in-law has a drill press. I suppose that would do

Thanks so much for the info / advice @Stick486. Unfortunately, I do not have a table saw.
Don't have a jigsaw either but can borrow one. Boy, I'm hitting a thousand am I not?

What would I use the table for? If necessary I can always look for something used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
By the way, who makes that drill guide?

I do not have a table saw.
I would be looking for one...Promax
pass on the Ryobie... VOE.....
Don't have a jigsaw either but can borrow one. Boy, I'm hitting a thousand am I not?
put a Bosch on your Xmas list...

What would I use the table for?
cutting material...
easiest tool to make a template for those slots...
If necessary I can always look for something used.
 
  • Like
Reactions: peterbata

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
@Stick486 Thanks again. I don't even know if the Promax brand is sold in Canada. Is it somehow tied to the Bench Dog brand? All I come up with is cast iron router table when I do a Google search.

I contacted someone online earlier about a Skilsaw table saw. He was selling it for 95.00. When I asked him to provide me with a model number he went MIA.

There are plenty of used tables on Facebook marketplace within close proximity to where I live. I just don't enough about the hardware in general to make a proper decision.

Any recommendations (beside Promax) if I should go the used route?

Patience and some research I guess. Oh, and this forum of course!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
hardware we know...
just ask...
 
  • Like
Reactions: peterbata

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Peter,
I showed my son the 2 designs and he said the second one is too much work for the end result. You don't need the holes on the sides even if you choose the first design. The first one will be solid and much easier to build. If you need advice on a Marketplace find I would be happy to consult for free. So you don't need a drill guide or drill press for now. You could definitely use a table saw if you don't have one, unless you don't plan on any other woodworking projects. You could give a cutting list to wherever you buy your wood from and for a fee(usually $1/cut) they can give you what you need. If you don't have clamps for glue ups you can use screws (pre-drill pilot holes)
What area of Laval do you live in ? maybe we can get together to discuss your project.
Cheers,
Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Peter,
I showed my son the 2 designs and he said the second one is too much work for the end result. You don't need the holes on the sides even if you choose the first design. The first one will be solid and much easier to build.Cheers,
Dan
Good day Dan

So nice of you to get back to me. I wasn't really fond of the design that featured the holes (never a big fan of Swiss cheese)

If you need advice on a Marketplace find I would be happy to consult for free. So you don't need a drill guide or drill press for now. You could definitely use a table saw if you don't have one, unless you don't plan on any other woodworking projects.

If I can pick up a used table saw for a reasonable price I would do so. I am putting together a tools / supply list as we speak actually. I will attach it to this post.

You could give a cutting list to wherever you buy your wood from and for a fee(usually $1/cut) they can give you what you need.

I was planning on having the folks at either Reno Depot or Home Depot rip my MDF 4'x8' into 3" and 6" x 8' lengths. Easier to transport and work with once I get back home.

I was pleasantly surprised when a few minutes ago I received an email message from my son-in-law. In it, he attached a Solidworks plan for the acoustic panel. I will attach that as well. This fellow is so talented. Oh, and what a guitarist!

If you don't have clamps for glue ups you can use screws (pre-drill pilot holes)
I may pick up a few clamps.

What area of Laval do you live in ? maybe we can get together to discuss your project.

I live in close proximity to the large hospital which is located on Boulevard René-Laennec, Laval, QC H7M 3L9. Actually, we're not that far from the mall Le Carrefour Laval. If you're ever in the area we could together for a cup of Joe. It would certainly be a pleasure.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Here are some used table saw brands that I came across. Any recommendations. Certain makes / models I should stay away from like the plague?

Craftsman - Skilsaw - Delta - Rockwell
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Here are some used table saw brands that I came across. Any recommendations. Certain makes / models I should stay away from like the plague?

Craftsman - Skilsaw - Delta - Rockwell
Craftsman - NO... support and parts are a serious problem...

Skilsaw - leaves a lot to be desired..

Delta/Rockwell - need model numbers..

Bosch 4100 - you can't go wrong...
 
  • Like
Reactions: DesertRatTom

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
Peter; the great thing about woodworking and woodworkers advice is that you'll discover that there are a lot of ways to skin cats. Many suggestions are focused on efficiency and accuracy, but until you've built up your own tool collection, and the accompanying experience, you'll be facing this sort of conundrum frequently. Don't be discouraged; we've all been there. A tool acquisition priority list couldn't hurt, but the one piece of advice I'd give (in two parts) is buy only quality brand names...aftermarket service is really important...and stay away from used power tools. A good chance they're either 'hot' or somebody else's headache. There are exceptions of course, but again for that you need hands on experience.
Keep your eyes open for Estate Sales if you really want 'experienced 'tools.
Take up Montreal Dan's offer; he's a great guy and you'll learn a lot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Peter; the great thing about woodworking and woodworkers advice is that you'll discover that there are a lot of ways to skin cats. Many suggestions are focused on efficiency and accuracy, but until you've built up your own tool collection, and the accompanying experience, you'll be facing this sort of conundrum frequently. Don't be discouraged; we've all been there. A tool acquisition priority list couldn't hurt, but the one piece of advice I'd give (in two parts) is buy only quality brand names...aftermarket service is really important...and stay away from used power tools. A good chance they're either 'hot' or somebody else's headache. There are exceptions of course, but again for that you need hands on experience.
Keep your eyes open for Estate Sales if you really want 'experienced 'tools.
Take up Montreal Dan's offer; he's a great guy and you'll learn a lot
You're absolutely right about "quality brand names" I agree wholeheartedly. That has always been my philosophy especially when it came / comes to audio gear.

Estate Sales great idea except that could take a while and I would like to get started.

And like any other hobby, one could get carried away and end up spending a boat load of $$$ on items that you either don't need or will never / hardly use. Slippery slope!

As far as Montreal Dan's offer. I welcome the opportunity.

Thank you so much. Have a safe and wonderful day! Peter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,002 Posts
Hi Peter, I don't know if I posted this for you before, but it sounds like you're nearer the beginning of the woodworking journey than the end. So here's a pdf of the 17 plus things that helped me accelerate the learning curve going from home improvement to woodworking. Hope it saves you some mistakes and missteps. Lots of pictures and some suggestions and recommendations on tools. For example, if I were getting my first budget table saw, it would be a Bosch 4100 10 inch job site saw, which is on sale at Lowes in U.S. for $100 off now. Having a table saw pretty much marks the transition from home improvement to woodworking. At any rate, here's the pdf. It's long and fairly detailed.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
Hello all. I hope that I am posting in the appropriate section. I was very impressed by the warm welcome that I received recently and was encouraged to ask questions if necessary. Well, I am here to ask.

I posted a photo in the "New Member Introductions" sub-forum of an acoustic panel that I wish to construct. I also mentioned that I purchased a Craftsman router thinking that it would be the right tool for the job.

For the most part the panels will measure 48" x 24" x 3" or 6" deep.

Now this is my thinking:

I thought that I would perhaps create a template based on the oval cutout seen on the 24" panel (top + bottom of panel) I could then use said template to make the slats on the side planks which are 48" in length.

I do not know how I am going to create this template (wood / plexiglass). And. if I did, how would I fasten it to the individual panels so that I might use my router to make the clean / straight cutouts. Would I clamp it down flat against the planks to be cut? I could also choose to go with the other option where circular holes were made in the planks but then I suppose that I would need a drill press to do this properly. Which I do not possess. I am also not that fond of the look. In the event that I keep the wood exposed.

I would also like to know what bit I would use if the router is what I end up using. I will attach a photo here as well.

I hope that I am making some sense! I really appreciate all the help that I can get. Peter
Clamps or double faced tape to hold the template to the panels to be cut. MDF makes nice templates but the MDF dust is not a lot of fun to work with. What wood will you use for the final project? Maybe use that for the template too? Poplar is a nice wood to use for templates.....easy to work with. Can you use the piece in your picture to make your template?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,954 Posts
Peter, I use 1/4" plywood for templates. It is easy to work with and san be used many times. "sureply" from Lowes/Home depot works good.
I would stay away from MDF for anything unless you have good dust collection. Double back tape is good for attaching the template as mentioned above.
Herb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Hi Peter, I don't know if I posted this for you before, but it sounds like you're nearer the beginning of the woodworking journey than the end. So here's a pdf of the 17 plus things that helped me accelerate the learning curve going from home improvement to woodworking. Hope it saves you some mistakes and missteps. Lots of pictures and some suggestions and recommendations on tools. For example, if I were getting my first budget table saw, it would be a Bosch 4100 10 inch job site saw, which is on sale at Lowes in U.S. for $100 off now. Having a table saw pretty much marks the transition from home improvement to woodworking. At any rate, here's the pdf. It's long and fairly detailed.
Thank you so much for taking the time to write me and provide me with that very valuable PDF. I look forward to reading it. I can use all the help that I can get at the moment. Have a great evening Peter.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Some of the old Rockwell's were very good saws with the possible flaw that the distance from the back of the blade to the back of the table was a bit short , but that can be fixed with an outfeed table. A friend of mine wanted to upgrade from his Rockwell and sold me his old one for $100. It was already wired for 220 which was great with me. This is a back up saw to my Unisaw and to be honest, it will do most of what my Unisaw will do and was about $2300 cheaper. By the way, some of the old Craftsman saws were probably Rockwells. If they are all cast iron tops they might be a good deal. Steer away from any of the newer ones. You'd be looking for earlier than late 70s, early 80s models.

Mdf works fine for templates but will wear fairly quickly so if you plan to keep it and use it often you should harden the edges with thin CA glue.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Danman1957

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
@Cherryville Chuck Thank you for chiming in. I don't see many Rockwell machines on the used market in the area that I live in. I did come across one (I will attach a pic $100 negotiable). The owner says it functions well but needs a little love) I take that to mean A Little Love = Many hours of repair. I do NOT possess that level of expertise by any stretch of the imagination. What I find strange is that in many cases where I ask for the age of the unit many sellers come back with a response that they don't know. I think that they DO know but just don't want to say!

Sounds to me like you scored a pretty sweet deal on your Rockwell.

Could I not use a 3/8" piece of plywood instead. I can always glue the MDF edges as you stated. Great suggestion by the way.

Note: The last pic is a Delta. But, you already knew that, right! Have a safe and wonderful evening wherever you may be. Peter
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,698 Posts
Peter do you have any handsaws? I'm trying to figure out how you plan on cutting the panels to size. If that is what you have you could use a handsaw to get rid of most of the waste material buy doing a plunge cut with the tip of the saw to get it started. Even a keyhole saw would help.

The big problem I see is the lack of tools available right now. To make the template I would say you will need a saw of some kind to help get rid of waste material, then you can use your router and flush trim bit to cut the straight sides for the hole of the template. If the radius of the flush trim bit is large enough for you for the inner corners of the hole, then you can flush the straight edges up at the corners and rout completely around the inside to finish the template. If the radius is too small and you want a larger radius then you need to layout the corner radii and trim up to them with the router and stop. You can then use a rasp or a dowel wrapped in corse sandpaper to finish up the corners.

With the template finished you can rough cut the waste out of your project panel and use the template to trim the hole with your router.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
If that is what you have you could use a handsaw to get rid of most of the waste material buy doing a plunge cut with the tip of the saw to get it started. Even a keyhole saw would help.

The big problem I see is the lack of tools available right now. To make the template I would say you will need a saw of some kind to help get rid of waste material, then you can use your router and flush trim bit to cut the straight sides for the hole of the template. If the radius of the flush trim bit is large enough for you for the inner corners of the hole, then you can flush the straight edges up at the corners and rout completely around the inside to finish the template. If the radius is too small and you want a larger radius then you need to layout the corner radii and trim up to them with the router and stop. You can then use a rasp or a dowel wrapped in corse sandpaper to finish up the corners.

With the template finished you can rough cut the waste out of your project panel and use the template to trim the hole with your router.
Hello @MEBCWD Thank you for your input

Peter do you have any handsaws? I'm trying to figure out how you plan on cutting the panels to size.

I am not sure if you referring to how I plan on reducing the 4'x8' MDF sheet down to size. If so, I am going to have the folks at Home Depot cut down the sheet into lengths of 8' and widths of both 3" and 6"

The only tools that I have access to at the moment are: My Craftsman 200 router, small Craftsman router table, circular saw, Jigsaw and electric miter saw (the last two I would borrow from a friend)

As someone had suggested in an earlier post I could use a jigsaw to cutout most of the material then finish it off with a trim bit. I think that I am going to give that a go. I believe that a 24" x 6" template is still something that I will have to figure out in order to make the remaining slats. That seems to be the first logical step but of course I could be wrong.
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top