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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A friend is making wooden salad servers, you know the ones like a giant pair of tweezers. He has been trying to figure a way to make a gig to round off the top end of the arms.
The arms are about 2 or3ml thick.28ml wide 250ml long.

Anyone know how this could be done using a router table?

He's making a lot of them hence the need for an easy way to do it.
 

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If he is making a hole why not use a drill bit? I would drill the hole first then make the shape of the tong and cut it out.
 

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Don't use a router for this. Set up a vertical JIG in front of a sanding belt or round sanding disk.

Drill a hole to establish the inside of the curve at the crotch of the server tongs. Now slide the wooden piece over the vertical jig.

The jig should rotate to bring the tongs into contact with the sanding surface. Rotate the tongs clockwise and counterclockwise on the vertical jig pin as you carefully rotate the jig's vertical pin closer to the sanding surface. At some point the jig should STOP rotating, presumably when the vertical pin is the correct distance from the sanding surface, and the sanding surface will only remove the wood that occupies the space in EXCESS of the desired thickness. The jig could have stops to force all of the tongs to rotate only so far in each direction. In that way, all of them will be sanded to the same thickness, and at the same extreme angles both left and right.

Joe


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Not sure I know what he's making. Given that, I would cut and finish the shape in thick, quarter sawn hardwood, then I'd slice off pieces for the tongs. This is assuming the tongs won't be connected.

If they are to be connected, I'd use a pattern on a quarter sawn, thick piece. It would be the full length of each tong, plus an extra inch for the curve in the middle. Then I'd steam the wood and bend it in a jig. The long grain would help with strength.

How about posting a picture of a commercial set so we can see what your friend is trying to make. This post is a shot in t he dark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies gentlemen. Yes a photo or three would have made a world of difference I agree. It was a long shot to solving someone else's problem. I personally think marking each arm out and then just doing it on the linisher. However he was adamant the router table and a jig were the go .......

Thanks one and all
 
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Here is jig that could be modified, although I don't see why a jig would be required to put a radius on a part that's only 3 mm thick (assuming that the 3 ml was a typo). A picture of the part may help with giving suggestions. The same concept would work on a belt sander.
 

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Here is jig that could be modified, although I don't see why a jig would be required to put a radius on a part that's only 3 mm thick (assuming that the 3 ml was a typo). A picture of the part may help with giving suggestions. The same concept would work on a belt sander.
I like that jig, Tom, thanks for posting.
Herb
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree myself I'd simply do it by hand and sight......job done.

Thanks I'll pass this onto him tomorrow when we catch up. Thanks Tom
 
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