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I'm beginning a project of relative complexity that will involve a large number of tenons on the same board(s).

I've done a few google searches for trimming tenons with a router but I was wondering if you all had specific suggestions of your favorite ways in which to clean up a tenon? I don't mind rough sawing to a line but I want to leave it fat by at least 1/16" because I'm not that confident in my sawing just yet. I'd like to use a router to clean up the cheeks and shoulders of the tenons.

Any one have favorite links? Quick jigs, etc? Precision is needed but bonus points if it doesn't require a complex jig!

Thanks in advance for the suggestions.
 

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I use a sharp Shoulder Plane - old fashioned but it works for me.


Rog
 

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Hi I built the pantorouter by Mattias Wandel woodgears.ca. This jig works incredibly well and is very durable, I have cut at least 700 tennons of various sizes on this and it still works great.. I took about 20 hours to build this but it is worth it. It will do many other joints besides mortise and tennon.

Regards Bob
 

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Well the jig/fixture is a platform that supports the router.
To that platform is attached a panel to hold and index the work.
It is essentially a T-section with surfaces ~12 x 16 x 3/4 MDF.
A window in the top panel exposes the end of the stock, (held on end).
The criticalites are the squareness of the construction and parallelism of the support panel. If parallel, edge guides can be used off of all 4 sides to make tenons of any section independent of the work's section or condition.
The router hardware references directly off of the jig. If the jig is well made & the work well prepared, the tenons will be parallel to the surfaces of the sample. The working concept is referencing, secondary, tertiary etc. If the surfaces of the jig are well situated to each other, square and flat, then the work will be well referenced to the work edges of the jig. And in turn, the router, cutter, and edge guides will find the work & rout its tenon faces & shoulders as if directly referenced from its surfaces. (Like a rabbet cutter bearing works directly off the edges of a panel.)
I did have some long (4") arbors, bearings and rabbet bits made so I can also work right from the surfaces of the of the work. (Samples).

So bottomline; it's a platform jig, the work is situated vertically, presented to the router through a window in the jig, and the tenons are routed referencing the work, the jig or both. Any section possible using edge guides or bearings. Plans in an out of print book of mine, "Fast, Easy, Accurate, Router Jigs", a phoney title the editors thought might sell!
 

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Just a note. Pat's book is available at Amazon. I just bought it.
 
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I'm beginning a project of relative complexity that will involve a large number of tenons on the same board(s).

I've done a few google searches for trimming tenons with a router but I was wondering if you all had specific suggestions of your favorite ways in which to clean up a tenon? I don't mind rough sawing to a line but I want to leave it fat by at least 1/16" because I'm not that confident in my sawing just yet. I'd like to use a router to clean up the cheeks and shoulders of the tenons.

Any one have favorite links? Quick jigs, etc? Precision is needed but bonus points if it doesn't require a complex jig!

Thanks in advance for the suggestions.
I recently posted my "Shop Built Mortise Machine" here. I'm new and don't know how to post the link but you can find it in my profile or search under the above title. It also cuts tenons. Very fast. Didn't cost much to build.

If you have a lot to cut you might try the floating tenon like I did for six dining chairs. Also in the thread.

Al
 

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I have a jig. For the table saw but now I tend to use my coping sled for tendons now a days.
 

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I have two favorite ways-
1) On my router table with a router sled. Sled keeps the workpiece perpendicular to the direction of travel.

2) On my panel saw-- slidng table with the crosscut fence set at 0º (which is 90º from the travel) and a dado blade. (See note ++)

Note ++: You might think that #2 is out of reach for you ... But I use the same technique on my American styled table saws with a dado blade and a crosscut sled.

Both techniques, using stop blocks, you can do a production run of quality tenons that are cut all the same.

I can do them on my band saw, a jig & hand-held router, or by hand... but why when there are much easier, faster methods.
 
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