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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys. Thanks for the add. Not new to woodwork done a bit of structural stuff but new to routing. Got some embryonic ideas of a new workshop and laundry with raised panel doors. Yet to buy the gear to do it. Keen to hear any decent advice on routers and tables and how to. Lots to learn but hey - everyone started somewhere! Cheers Torps. Sydney Australia
 

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Steve
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Sydneysider! Welcome aboard.
I'm based up in Lake Macquarie, just a router's throw away.
Do you have any router experience? I have 2. A Ryobi RRt-1600 plunge router from Bunnings, and a Makita model I can't remember in my table.
Both serve their purpose well. It depends on what you want to actually do with them.
I built my own table, nothing fancy but works for me so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sydneysider! Welcome aboard.
I'm based up in Lake Macquarie, just a router's throw away.
Do you have any router experience? I have 2. A Ryobi RRt-1600 plunge router from Bunnings, and a Makita model I can't remember in my table.
Both serve their purpose well. It depends on what you want to actually do with them.
I built my own table, nothing fancy but works for me so far.
Thanks for the warm welcome Steve!

Lovely lake Mac. Lucky man.

Router experience ?! A few decades ago I borrowed my brother-in-laws router to put a profile edge on a single piece douglas fir chopping block for my Mum. Does that count?! LOL I remember it well because I got some dust in my eye and had to go to the docs! Fun times. But the board is still going strong even though it's softwood.

About to buy a Makita trim router for doing the same thing. But need a bigger router and simple table to do the raised panels.
 

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Steve
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Thanks for the warm welcome Steve!

Lovely lake Mac. Lucky man.

Router experience ?! A few decades ago I borrowed my brother-in-laws router to put a profile edge on a single piece douglas fir chopping block for my Mum. Does that count?! LOL I remember it well because I got some dust in my eye and had to go to the docs! Fun times. But the board is still going strong even though it's softwood.

About to buy a Makita trim router for doing the same thing. But need a bigger router and simple table to do the raised panels.
Lol. The trim router will do some work okay, but sounds like you could do with a 1/2" router. Both of mine are, and because they come with the 1/4" collet will use the smaller bits as well.

Safety first - get those glasses to protect your eyes ;)

I can recommend the Ryobi, it's been a great plunge router, with soft start and speed control. Won't easily go on a table though, so if you want maximum flexibility in one router, that's not the best option. That's why I bought the bigger Makita, to mount in the table. It's a plunge router also (the one I bought) but great in the table. It didn't have soft start or speed control though.
It's similar to this model although my trigger is different: MAKITA 2100W Plunge Router RP2301FC
Oh, you want to make sure the trigger can be locked on if you're going to use it in a table. Highly important.
When I built my table I also used an aluminium universal plate I bought off eBay (ended up coming from Sydney) which the Makita lined up to the pre-drilled holes nicely. That was a few years ago now.

I think some of the other Aussies on the forum like Harrysin and James will second Makita as a brand, possibly Bosch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lol. The trim router will do some work okay, but sounds like you could do with a 1/2" router. Both of mine are, and because they come with the 1/4" collet will use the smaller bits as well.

Safety first - get those glasses to protect your eyes ;)

I can recommend the Ryobi, it's been a great plunge router, with soft start and speed control. Won't easily go on a table though, so if you want maximum flexibility in one router, that's not the best option. That's why I bought the bigger Makita, to mount in the table. It's a plunge router also (the one I bought) but great in the table. It didn't have soft start or speed control though.
It's similar to this model although my trigger is different: MAKITA 2100W Plunge Router RP2301FC
Oh, you want to make sure the trigger can be locked on if you're going to use it in a table. Highly important.
When I built my table I also used an aluminium universal plate I bought off eBay (ended up coming from Sydney) which the Makita lined up to the pre-drilled holes nicely. That was a few years ago now.

I think some of the other Aussies on the forum like Harrysin and James will second Makita as a brand, possibly Bosch.
Thanks for the guidance Steve. Much appreciated. Im a Makita guy so will lean that way especially if it's battery powered but a non firm preference if not. Tell me, being a newbie, what's soft start?
 

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Steve
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Thanks for the guidance Steve. Much appreciated. Im a Makita guy so will lean that way especially if it's battery powered but a non firm preference if not. Tell me, being a newbie, what's soft start?

Soft start, basically means that once you hit the switch, it spins up from zero to full (or whatever speed is set) over a few seconds, rather than hitting the switch and it goes full noise straight away, which can lead to it "kicking" and ruining your work.
Nifty feature, has helped me while learning to control the router at all times. Not so big a deal in a table mounted router, but for handheld, essential in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Soft start, basically means that once you hit the switch, it spins up from zero to full (or whatever speed is set) over a few seconds, rather than hitting the switch and it goes full noise straight away, which can lead to it "kicking" and ruining your work.
Nifty feature, has helped me while learning to control the router at all times. Not so big a deal in a table mounted router, but for handheld, essential in my opinion.
Awesome. Thanks Steve. Makes perfect sense in a hand held router, particularly a big one! Get the point about less of an issue in a table too. At the risk of sticking my neck out, it seems there's a strong marketing drive for complex tables when all you really need is a lift and a simple fence most of the time. I'm sure I've under estimated the more rocket science applications but don't see many being rocket scientists either! Simple is good I think.
 

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Awesome. Thanks Steve. Makes perfect sense in a hand held router, particularly a big one! Get the point about less of an issue in a table too. At the risk of sticking my neck out, it seems there's a strong marketing drive for complex tables when all you really need is a lift and a simple fence most of the time. I'm sure I've under estimated the more rocket science applications but don't see many being rocket scientists either! Simple is good I think.
Yep, I have a very simple table, and actually use the router's height adjustment as I don't have a complicated lift. And a very simple fence I clamp in place.
The router plate I got has some simple measurements on it I use to align where I want, and I'm good.

Simple is just fine
 

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@Torps,
Welcome. I second Steve's advice. Note that with the current model of Makita RP2301FC, there is an above-table height-adjust feature, so no lift is required. The height adjust is a bit slow, but you can always speed it up by using a suitable drive key in a cordless drill to make large changes, then use an allen wrench or similar to sneak up to the exact height.
Another well-esteemed large router, which also dose not need a lift, is the Antipodean-origin Triton 3 1/2 HP beast, but I understand that with multiple changes of ownership, support is not what it used to be. I missed out on one last Black Friday, but got a very good deal on the Makita, so not complaining. The Triton has some very nifty features, some of which are redundant in table-mounted mode. Others are great (self-locking shaft when changing bits in-table), but their absence is not life-altering.
BTW, none of these is cordless, only some trim routers are commonly cordless, although a member recently mentioned a 2 HP 1/2 collet model. Have not come across it yet.
Apart from safety glasses, remember ear protectors and respiration protection.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Do read up on speed/feed , or this, of woods to prevent burning and safe cutting. There are charts online you can print that have suggested speeds for size of bit. Depth is also something you want to be concerned with as too much at one time will stress the cutter. And that goes for raised panel bit sets. On my router able I make 3 passes to create the raised panel by 1st getting the bit to its proper height and then adjusting the fence for each pass. As both these bits have bearings you'll need to use a straight edge to ensure you fence is even with the bearing. At that point I mark the table for the final position of the fence. Then I move the fence back so the cut is made in 3-4 passes with none being too large. This is where scrap is really good but make sure the scrap is the exact same thickness to be truly useful and so it matches the cuts for the slots on the other bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
@Torps,
Welcome. I second Steve's advice. Note that with the current model of Makita RP2301FC, there is an above-table height-adjust feature, so no lift is required. The height adjust is a bit slow, but you can always speed it up by using a suitable drive key in a cordless drill to make large changes, then use an allen wrench or similar to sneak up to the exact height.
Another well-esteemed large router, which also dose not need a lift, is the Antipodean-origin Triton 3 1/2 HP beast, but I understand that with multiple changes of ownership, support is not what it used to be. I missed out on one last Black Friday, but got a very good deal on the Makita, so not complaining. The Triton has some very nifty features, some of which are redundant in table-mounted mode. Others are great (self-locking shaft when changing bits in-table), but their absence is not life-altering.
BTW, none of these is cordless, only some trim routers are commonly cordless, although a member recently mentioned a 2 HP 1/2 collet model. Have not come across it yet.
Apart from safety glasses, remember ear protectors and respiration protection.
G'day Biogio and thanks! Thinking of other tools just about anything can be lived with evening though the temptation is always there to spend way too much! I've been watching the Triton TRA001 for a long time and whilst it universally gets good feedback I can't believe they've dropped the ball so much in aftersales. Not sure what it's like Stateside but here I see it's done a magic disappearing act. Sad.
 

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Hey Torps and welcome! The Steve's are right on the mark in advice given. In the U.S. I am receiving very good support from Triton tho be it through their warranty team at Tool Stream! Sent the TRA001 off today. I believe the idiot that owns mine forgot to have the router off and safety door closed when trying to engage the spindle lock and broke the gear shaft. He said he did it right but I have my doubts :sneaky: . I concur with the others that you don't have to break the bank on a router table set up. Good luck and BE SAFE!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hey Torps and welcome! The Steve's are right on the mark in advice given. In the U.S. I am receiving very good support from Triton tho be it through their warranty team at Tool Stream! Sent the TRA001 off today. I believe the idiot that owns mine forgot to have the router off and safety door closed when trying to engage the spindle lock and broke the gear shaft. He said he did it right but I have my doubts :sneaky: . I concur with the others that you don't have to break the bank on a router table set up. Good luck and BE SAFE!!!!
Hey thanks Marco! Glad to see Tool Stream are looking after you and the Triton. You need to sack that guy although you will pay for it ;).

You guys are so lucky to have so many tool shops and such good pricing on tools. Us little 'ole Aussies get a raw deal in comparison!

Take it easy!

Torps
 

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Ross
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Welcome to the forum.
 

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G'day @Torps Sorry I missed your entrance.... Welcome to the forum.

No matter what anyone says, I consider the Triton best router hands down.

I have a TRA001 and TRC001. The makita comes third....LOL
 
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