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Can anyone recommend a book that shows, step-by-step, what each bit does?? I have a set of (probably crummy) bits I bought when I got my DeWalt router.

Now don't laugh here. I decided to take a few moments the other day to see just what each one did. Well, that didn't go well. My routing concepts have been further debilitated by that exercise.

I have listened to so many different DVD's I don't if I should use a router table, hand-held router or a table saw. I am afraid to start any more projects.

Please help an old man (laughing) get it, please?

Ronster...
 

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Ron, many web sites offer an image of the bit and the profile it cuts. By way of example check out this link to MLCS, it makes clear what the end results are:

Molding Router Bits 3

If there is a woodworking store in your area like Rockler or Woodcraft the staff will be happy to assist you. If you need help finding a specific profile just post a question in the router bits section of the forums.
 

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Can anyone recommend a book that shows, step-by-step, what each bit does?? I have a set of (probably crummy) bits I bought when I got my DeWalt router.

Now don't laugh here. I decided to take a few moments the other day to see just what each one did. Well, that didn't go well. My routing concepts have been further debilitated by that exercise.

I have listened to so many different DVD's I don't if I should use a router table, hand-held router or a table saw. I am afraid to start any more projects.

Please help an old man (laughing) get it, please?

Ronster...
If you are working with small pieces it is usually advisable to work on a router table. If the pieces are large, they probably won't fit on a table and are worked on with a handheld. Most bits either make a groove or a profile. If the bit has a bearing it is meant to follow an edge or a pattern. Bits without a bearing have to be guided by a straight edge which can be as simple as something straight clamped to your work, or they can be used on a router table with fence.
As you and the router are facing into the work, feed from left to right. Pay attention to the router. If the rpm drops way down or you are pushing hard you are feeding too fast and/or cutting too much wood in one pass.
Don't get discouraged. Keep trying, it should get easier as you get the feel of the of things.
 

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MLCS is a good site to see router profiles (what shapes they make), but personally, I would rather see you start out at the library, going over books by Bill Hylton (personal one I would start with is Woodworking with the router), or Pat Warner (googling him can find his site). This site seems to be based at some point around a tv show the Router Workshop, but I don't have access to it, and while they have some video's on thewoodworkingchannel.com, the last time I tried it on my computer, it wasn't Linux compatible. (can't view or recommend since I don't know where to start with them).


Now, not knowing if one should use a router table, free hand router, tablesaw, guided saw system, etc, is all really a matter of choice on what your trying to do, and do you feel safe doing it, and do you have the tool. An example is tenon's; they can be done with any of the above methods, just different ways (how you hold the workpiece, and feel safe doing it).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for helping. Cherryville Chuck, you gave me a good tip. I wasn't working with the router and wood in front of me. I was routing down the length of the wood and somes the router would try to zip ahead of me when using a rounding bit.

I am also getting the book intro book by Bill Hylton. It looks like a great book. I am starting another ramp project and look forward to getting some practical tips. I really am needing most all the tools for my shop. I mean all of them.

It's that one part of a project needs one tool, then later on you need another.

Perseverance seems to be the key here. (that and deep pockets, haha)
 

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Thanks for helping. Cherryville Chuck, you gave me a good tip. I wasn't working with the router and wood in front of me. I was routing down the length of the wood and somes the router would try to zip ahead of me when using a rounding bit.

I am also getting the book intro book by Bill Hylton. It looks like a great book. I am starting another ramp project and look forward to getting some practical tips. I really am needing most all the tools for my shop. I mean all of them.

It's that one part of a project needs one tool, then later on you need another.

Perseverance seems to be the key here. (that and deep pockets, haha)
If the router was trying to get ahead of you that means you were doing what is called a climb cut. Cutting the wrong way, when cutting you should be pushing agianst the force of the router. Climb cutting is a way to prevent tear out in open grain wood like oak or mohagany but can be dangerous.
 

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Thanks for helping. Cherryville Chuck, you gave me a good tip. I wasn't working with the router and wood in front of me. I was routing down the length of the wood and somes the router would try to zip ahead of me when using a rounding bit.

I am also getting the book intro book by Bill Hylton. It looks like a great book. I am starting another ramp project and look forward to getting some practical tips. I really am needing most all the tools for my shop. I mean all of them.

It's that one part of a project needs one tool, then later on you need another.

Perseverance seems to be the key here. (that and deep pockets, haha)
Glad I could help. Perseverance will eventually get you to the finish line - if the money holds out.
 
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