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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anybody here have the dimensions for the Router Workshop router table? I would like to make one for my cabin’s pole barn. I could probably guesstimate from pictures but numbers would be better? I looked through their website but things are getting thin there since they stop airing their shows. Thanks.
 

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@VintageMike

I've got the plans for the router table, but unfortunately, my shop is in a state of confusion so I can't get to them immediately - I'll try later today and I'll get back to you.
 

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Looking at the design above it doesn't look like the best set up. You should make the table long, mine is 4 feet. A short table makes it harder to control long boards like when you're making molding. Also, don't put the router at one end you need support on both ends. You should have feather boards on the table and fence and a miter slot in the table. Check out the link that Chuck mentioned and look at youtube. Above all don't buy one!!!
 

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Looking at the design above it doesn't look like the best set up. You should make the table long, mine is 4 feet. A short table makes it harder to control long boards like when you're making molding. Also, don't put the router at one end you need support on both ends. You should have feather boards on the table and fence and a miter slot in the table. Check out the link that Chuck mentioned and look at youtube. Above all don't buy one!!!
Art - the Router Workshop boys used this table for years and had no issues. When I made mine, I moved the plate closer to the center of the table. I don't have a miter slot in the table as I've never needed one. If you use a slot, then you have to make sure your guide is perpendicular to the cutter. That's not necessary. When I set my fence I'm not concerned that it is exactly square - I just set it where I need it. Since the bit is spinning, it doesn't matter if the fence is square. My fence has adjustable faces, with a groove for feather boards.

I've used my table to make a rail and stile doors and never had a problem with the size of the table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you much!! I appreciate it. Like I said, this us for my cabin. I don’t believe I would need anything bigger for a few small projects.
 

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Art - the Router Workshop boys used this table for years and had no issues. When I made mine, I moved the plate closer to the center of the table. I don't have a miter slot in the table as I've never needed one. If you use a slot, then you have to make sure your guide is perpendicular to the cutter. That's not necessary. When I set my fence I'm not concerned that it is exactly square - I just set it where I need it. Since the bit is spinning, it doesn't matter if the fence is square. My fence has adjustable faces, with a groove for feather boards.

I've used my table to make a rail and stile doors and never had a problem with the size of the table.
I understand but over the years I have come to appreciate my 4 x 2 foot table every time I am doing something even slightly large. I seldom use a router freehand and a table this size does it all for me. When I'm doing a 9 foot piece of molding is never drops or twists. To me, it's the same as trying to use a planer on a long board without supporting the outfeed. It doesn't take any more effort to build it longer so why not do it. As for the miter slot I use it all the time for feather boards as well a miter gauge when doing rail and stiles to keep the cut square. There is no way I would build a router table that couldn't hold feather boards on the fence and table.
 

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I understand but over the years I have come to appreciate my 4 x 2 foot table every time I am doing something even slightly large. I seldom use a router freehand and a table this size does it all for me. When I'm doing a 9 foot piece of molding is never drops or twists. To me, it's the same as trying to use a planer on a long board without supporting the outfeed. It doesn't take any more effort to build it longer so why not do it. As for the miter slot I use it all the time for feather boards as well a miter gauge when doing rail and stiles to keep the cut square. There is no way I would build a router table that couldn't hold feather boards on the fence and table.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VixjZ75IKiI
Art - I get what you're saying and that works for you. I just never found the need for a miter slot on the table. I use a push block when doing rail and style.
Check out this video at the 5:00 minute mark - that's the method I use. There are different ways of doing things, so we each pick the method that works FOR US.

 

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The push block is also the way I do it. For things like rail and stile ends or rabbeting I made a right angle arm that slides along the edge of my table. If you want blow out protection you add a narrow strip behind the piece.
 

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Art - I get what you're saying and that works for you. I just never found the need for a miter slot on the table. I use a push block when doing rail and style.
Check out this video at the 5:00 minute mark - that's the method I use. There are different ways of doing things, so we each pick the method that works FOR US.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHnLvps8968
Vince, I get your point regarding the type of work shown in the Sommerfeld video, but how do you deal with longish thin stock? That is where I have been using horizontal (table T-slot) and vertical ( fence T-slot) mounted feather boards, but I am interested in better ways to do it. Thanks.
 

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Biagio - for long thin stock, I use two feather boards with each mounted on either side of the bit on the fence, to hold the work down. I have a miter slot milled into my fence. This keeps the work from tipping at either end. If needed I use a push block to push the work against the fence to keep it from creeping away from the fence. I posted pictures of my fence on this forum some time ago, but that was before I milled a slot, and I don't have an up-to-date picture to post at this time.
 

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The push block is also the way I do it. For things like rail and stile ends or rabbeting I made a right angle arm that slides along the edge of my table. If you want blow out protection you add a narrow strip behind the piece.
Charles, pardon my ignorance. What is the advantage of the right angle arm over the push block for cope and stick, and when would you choose it over the push block? I made a T-slot coping sled years ago, but found it more trouble than it was worth.
Anything that requires setting the fence parallel to the table T-slot, takes me an inordinate amount of time, so am always keen to find a better way.
 

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Biagio - for long thin stock, I use two feather boards with each mounted on either side of the bit on the fence, to hold the work down. I have a miter slot milled into my fence. This keeps the work from tipping at either end. If needed I use a push block to push the work against the fence to keep it from creeping away from the fence. I posted pictures of my fence on this forum some time ago, but that was before I milled a slot, and I don't have an up-to-date picture to post at this time.
Thanks, Vince. Do you use more than one push block on a longish piece,I.e. near the front and at the back? That is when I find the horizontal feather boards useful.
 

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Biagio - no, generally one push block near the bit on the infeed side and push with my other hand or a push block with the rubber backing
 

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Vince, I get your point regarding the type of work shown in the Sommerfeld video, but how do you deal with longish thin stock? That is where I have been using horizontal (table T-slot) and vertical ( fence T-slot) mounted feather boards, but I am interested in better ways to do it. Thanks.
That's the whole point of having miter and t slots. Without feather boards you're making your life a lot more complicated and dangerous. It's so simple to adjust the feather board to keep the wood snug against the fence. It also allows you to keep both hands on the stock as you feed it through. The ability to use a miter gauge is a bonus but not the most important thing. I learned the importance of feather boards over 50 years ago when I ruined a piece of antique wood that was essential. The project couldn't be completed for the lack of one stinking piece of molding. I too am always interested in new and better ways of doing things. But the keyword is better. If someone wants to spend a few bucks to eliminate the featherboards then there is always the JessEm clear cut guides. But for those of you out there just starting out at least use featherboards . Or not it's up to you.

https://www.infinitytools.com/jesse...erm=4580221845584562&utm_content=All Products
 
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