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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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While doing a little shop drawer organizing I came across this delight that was left over from my father’s stuff. For those of us who remember the Gillette double-edged razor blades it is a trip down memory lane showing how many shaves you could get from those thin, scary-sharp pieces of steel. The stone brags you’ll get 100 shaves.
 

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Oliver they were not that great but I didn't know any better. 100 shaves that is false advertising or would we say fake advertising. :smile:
 

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Oliver they were not that great but I didn't know any better. 100 shaves that is false advertising or would we say fake advertising. :smile:
and here I thought he was gonna say skid marks...
 

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Weren't nothing wrong with those Gillette double edged razors. My father in law (80+) still uses his from when he was in the military back in the 50's.

I started with the injector single edged blades.
 
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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Oliver they were not that great but I didn't know any better. 100 shaves that is false advertising or would we say fake advertising. :smile:
They didn't say 100 "good shaves", Don. They only promised 100. Okay, maybe the last 50 or so were a little painful and tended to pull rather than cut, but, hey, we're talkin' about the time when men were MEN and razors weren't disposable. The house I grew up in (built in the 1950s) had a medicine cabinet in the bathroom that had a little slot in back where you could dispose of your used razor blade. You just slipped it into the slot and it dropped down into the wall between the studs. Very high tech.
 

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I tried my dad's double edged with blue blades and the problem with them was that they were so thin that they could flex. And when they did they had a tendency to dig in. He also had a styptic pencil for anyone who also remembers them. Burned like hell but they would stop the bleeding almost instantly. I forgot to mention that I didn't tell him that I had used his razor and when he used it next it was badly dull. Who knew peach fuzz would do that? In a day or two I got my very own Schick injector and was told in no short order not to touch his again.
 

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My dad kept a drinking glass in the bathroom. Every morning he would wet the inside of the glass and then place his razor blade in it and with one finger holding the blade against the inside of the glass, he would rotate the glass. A couple of revolutions and then he would flip the blade over and do the other side. Then put it in the razor and shave with it. I didn't watch him shave every day, so I have no idea how many shaves he got out of a blade, but the honing treatment inside the glass seems to have worked quite well.

Thanks for bringing back some memories from 1944-1945.

Charley
 

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WoW... I remember starting shaving with razors like these.... thankfully we've moved on to bigger and better things since then. I also remember seeing the slot in the back of the medicine cabinet.

Charles, I still use a styptic pencil... couldn't survive without it.
 

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@CharleyL: Charley I was think about how my dad used to sharpen his blades in a water glass as I was reading these posts. Yes, it does take me back to the mid 40's also. Life was a lot simpler then.
 
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I still have mine somewhere. I remember going from the blue blades to the Stainless steel blade, they seemed sharper and stayed that way longer. Also used the brush in the mug with the bars of shaving soap. Of course the styptic pencil, still use that.
One reason the slot in the back of the medicine cabinet was to keep from getting cut by tossing in the garbage,and also kept the kids safe.
Herb.
 

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They didn't say 100 "good shaves", Don. They only promised 100. Okay, maybe the last 50 or so were a little painful and tended to pull rather than cut, but, hey, we're talkin' about the time when men were MEN and razors weren't disposable. The house I grew up in (built in the 1950s) had a medicine cabinet in the bathroom that had a little slot in back where you could dispose of your used razor blade. You just slipped it into the slot and it dropped down into the wall between the studs. Very high tech.
Hi Oliver,my father used a cut-throat razor & apart from his sharpening stones he had a strop which was leather on one side & a coarse looking webbing material on the other.This strop was about 18/20 inches long & 3 or so inches wide & caused many a sore backside on us kids.Jamesjj
 

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Hi Oliver,my father used a cut-throat razor & apart from his sharpening stones he had a strop which was leather on one side & a coarse looking webbing material on the other.This strop was about 18/20 inches long & 3 or so inches wide & caused many a sore backside on us kids.Jamesjj
My dad used the "V" belt off the lathe to keep us on the straight and narrow.
Herb
 

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Stainless steel was very expensive in the early 40's, so was never used for razor blades. Now, we use sheets of stainless on the outside walls of buildings. I doubt you can even find any of those old blued steel razor blades now. Even the throw away one tine razors have stainless blades now. Stainless steel is much harder than regular steel because of it's chromium content, so it holds an edge much better . Yes, I still have my styptic pencil and use it frequently too.

Charley
 

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Oliver ~ OMG. Your thread has taken me down memory lane. I just now spotted the identical stone in my Dad's tool cabinet that I inherited when he passed. I never really knew what it was used for until now. He never threw anything away and must have moved this stone to the rest of his drawers of chisels and honing stones. Thanks for sharing.

Bob
 

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My Dad used to swear by the technique of plucking the blade with his fingers and thumb after he washed and dried the blade. He felt that the natural grease on your hands preserved the edge on the blade. He was a Scot and pretty canny with his money so he was determined to make a blade last however much it hurt.

Interestingly in the last year I have gone back to wet shaving after about 50 years of electric. I find that shaving has become quite enjoyable and that the time is quite useful for planning the day ahead. One disturbing fact is of course is that the reflection I look at these days is an old man who looks uncannily like my father !
 

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Having worn a beard for about 50 years, actual full face shaving is a vague memory.
It's not a full beard so a blade is necessary....occasionally. Over a year ago, I bought a bag full of those Bic disposable razors. Just about 6 swipes each time and, I'm done. I think there's still 4 or 5 of them left. My beard is kept fairly short and, the trimming is what's time consuming. But, that chore is timed with haircuts. Once a month. Retirement is great!
 
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I started with the double edge razor, but at one point Gilette came out with their disposable "Good News" blade. They've fancied it up a little since then, adding a second blade, and I buy them in bulk. After chemo, my beard has become thicker and wirey, so they only last 5-8 shaves and then start pulling. But then, I only shave daily when on the road. Neat find. I know my dad used his double edged razor until he passed. And yes, the stiptic was a must have shaving accessory. I think part of rinsing off those old blades was to get the dried on lather removed, I think the dried on stuff kept the blade from shaving right.
 

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When I started shaving (over 50 years ago now), I used a Wilkinson straight razor with replaceable blades, just like Dad's - there was an outer part with curved combs that had keyhole slots that installed on pins with the blade underneath. To replace the blade, you just moved the outer part with the combs until it came off the pins, replaced the blade and slid the outer cover back on, the blades looked like a smaller version of the blades that carpet installers use, long, rectangular and with a slot along the center. Still remember the first time using one of those "new fangled" Gillette razors, think I've given more blood to the Red Cross during a donation. Guess they were a little sharper than the Wilkinson - the blades were certainly a lot thinner - and definitely didn't need as much pressure.
 
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